Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Springing forward
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Eyes on the Depths
Cacophony Acoustics
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Behavior
How Much Babies Know
Seeing red means danger ahead
Internet Generation
Birds
Penguins
Lovebirds
Peafowl
Chemistry and Materials
Sugary Survival Skill
Revving Up Green Machines
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Computers
Play for Science
Graphene's superstrength
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Earth's Poles in Peril
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Flower family knows its roots
Environment
Shrimpy Invaders
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Alien Invasions
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Megamouth Sharks
Basking Sharks
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Symbols from the Stone Age
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Dreaming makes perfect
Invertebrates
Giant Squid
Octopuses
Clams
Mammals
Labradors
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Cows
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
IceCube Science
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Fungus Hunt
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Crocodiles
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Robots on a Rocky Road
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Where rivers run uphill
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Life under Ice

Deep below a thick slab of floating ice off Antarctica, an astounding community of creatures has surprised scientists who had expected to find nothing there. In December 2003, researchers drilled a hole through the Amery ice shelf in Antarctica. They picked a spot that was 100 kilometers (62 miles) from open ocean. And they had to dig through 480 meters (1,575 feet) of ice just to get to Once the drill broke through, a camera took pictures of a patch of seafloor that spanned 2 square meters (22 square feet). No one expected to see much that far from open ocean. Scientists didn't think that currents under the ice were strong enough to deliver food and nutrients to support life in such an environment. Creatures that live in the ocean's depths often filter food out of the water or pick food off the seafloor. In the photographs, however, the team identified more than two dozen species of sponges, mollusks, sea urchins, and other invertebrates, including a sea snail. "These creatures are no different from those that live in open water at that depth," says Martin J. Riddle, a marine biologist at the Australian Government Antarctic Division in Kingston, Tasmania. the ocean underneath. A probe measured the currents under the shelf, which were strong enough to deliver tiny creatures called microplankton to the area. Microplankton are at the bottom of the food chain. In the future, the scientists say, paleontologists shouldn't rule out the possibility that ancient communities of sea life were once covered with ice, too. It's a cold but bustling world down there.E. Sohn

Life under Ice
Life under Ice








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™