Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Walks on the Wild Side
New Elephant-Shrew
Sea Lilies on the Run
Behavior
Copycat Monkeys
Memory by Hypnosis
The Science Fair Circuit
Birds
Parrots
Birds We Eat
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
These gems make their own way
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Computers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
A Classroom of the Mind
Music of the Future
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Middle school science adventures
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Quick Quake Alerts
Earth from the inside out
Surf Watch
Environment
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Bald Eagles Forever
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
A Long Haul
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
Lungfish
Codfish
Megamouth Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Chew for Health
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Detecting True Art
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Gut Microbes and Weight
Invertebrates
Clams
Termites
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Quolls
Pugs
Moles
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Project Music
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Nature's Alphabet
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Pythons
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
World of Three Suns
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Toy Challenge
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Flying the Hyper Skies
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Arctic Melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Life trapped under a glacier

It may not be a tourist hot spot, but Blood Falls is very interesting to scientists who study living creatures. A geomicrobiologist — someone who studies how tiny organisms affect or use minerals — recently studied the rusty water and came up with some surprising results. The water that feeds Blood Falls probably comes from a salty underground lake. It’s home to microbes that surprisingly don’t need oxygen to survive. Microbes are tiny organisms, usually invisible to the naked eye. The microbes found in Blood Falls are similar to other microbes that live in the ocean. “This briny pond is a unique sort of time capsule,” says Jill Mikucki, the Dartmouth University geomicrobiologist who led the study of the water seeping from Blood Falls. “I don’t know of any other environment quite like this on earth.” When she and her team studied the water, they found no oxygen but lots of dissolved iron. They suspect that the underwater reservoir formed when a giant glacier, now 1,300 feet thick, moved over the salty lake at least 1.5 million years ago. This trapped the water and everything in it in an oxygen-free, or anoxic, environment. Unlike human beings and most other forms of life, the microbes from Blood Falls don’t need oxygen to live. Instead, they are able to exist using the iron and sulfates, chemical salts also found in the water. The microbes transfer particles called electrons from the sulfates to the iron. The microbes at Blood Falls show that life can exist in even the harshest environments. In addition to giving us more information about our own planet, the study of these “extremophiles” may be useful in other scientific areas — like the search for life on other planets! If scientists find organisms on Earth that live on sulfur and iron, instead of oxygen, researchers might gain a better idea of where to look for life elsewhere in the universe. Power words: (Yahoo! Kids Dictionary and WordNet) microbe: A tiny life form; a microorganism, especially a bacterium that causes disease. iron: A silvery-white, magnetic, metallic element occurring abundantly in combined forms. Used in a wide range of important structural materials. sulfate: A chemical compound made from sulfur. anoxic: A severe lack of oxygen

Life trapped under a glacier
Life trapped under a glacier








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™