Agriculture
Springing forward
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Newts
Bullfrogs
Toads
Animals
Vampire Bats on the Run
Who's Knocking?
Insects Take a Breather
Behavior
How Much Babies Know
Internet Generation
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Birds
Albatrosses
Quails
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Computers
Play for Science
Look into My Eyes
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Battling Mastodons
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Bugs with Gas
Deep History
Life under Ice
Environment
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Sounds and Silence
Blooming Jellies
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Digging Up Stone Age Art
If Only Bones Could Speak
Fish
Barracudas
Hagfish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Chocolate Rules
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Surviving Olympic Heat
Running with Sneaker Science
Invertebrates
Clams
Leeches
Butterflies
Mammals
Raccoons
Manatees
Mule
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Road Bumps
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Getting the dirt on carbon
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Alligators
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Icy Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Watering the Air
Catching Some Rays
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Life on the Down Low

There are few places that scientists haven't explored. In their searches for exotic life on Earth, researchers have ventured into even the driest deserts and the steamiest jungles. But conditions in the deep ocean are so extreme that very little is known about life at the bottom of the sea. The deep sea is one of Earth's last frontiers. Now, a team of scientists from eight countries has completed the first survey of life in the deep waters off Antarctica. The team worked aboard a German icebreaker called Polarstern. An icebreaker is a special ship that can withstand strong storms and push through ice on the water's surface. To catch deep-sea creatures, the team lowered a scoop to the ocean floor. It took 6 to 8 hours to lower and raise the scoop just once. The sampling sites were up to 4 miles below the ocean's surface. The effort was worthwhile. Before this expedition, researchers had thought that few creatures would be able to live in the harsh Antarctic ocean conditions. They thought deep-sea life would be less diverse than life in warmer waters. But the scientists were in for a surprise. They found unexpected diversity among deep-sea creatures. What's more, many of these creatures had never before been seen. For example, of the 674 species of isopods picked up by the team, 585 were new to science. (Isopods are a type of crustacean that includes pill bugs, little grey bugs found in many gardens.) That's more new isopod species than have been found in shallower Antarctic waters in the entire past century. Researchers also found other surprises, including carnivorous (meat-eating) sponges. The sponges and most of the other bottom dwellers that the researchers found were largely white. No light reaches such depths, so most are blind. How do these organisms survive in the frigid, inky-black waters? First of all, their bodies are specially adapted to the cold. And when it comes to food, many are scavengers. Their diets consist mainly of debris (little pieces of carcasses and food excreted by other animals) that drifts down from above. Scientists call this debris "marine snow." By the time some of this debris gets to these deep-water creatures, it's already made its way through the bodies of two or three other sea creatures, the researchers say. Many questions remain about how the creatures can survive in such harsh conditions. The deep-sea dwellers collected by the team may provide answers. The data will also help scientists figure out how ocean species migrate and how their ecosystems develop. There's a lot of ocean left to explore!—J.L. Pegg

Life on the Down Low
Life on the Down Low








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™