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Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
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Cacophony Acoustics
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
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The Incredible Shrunken Kids
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It's a Small E-mail World After All
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South America's sticky tar pits
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Meet your mysterious relative
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
The Rise of Yellowstone
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Flu river
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Catching Some Rays
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Sahara Cemetery
Stone Age Sole Survivors
The Taming of the Cat
Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Sharks
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Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Losing with Heads or Tails
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Dreaming makes perfect
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
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Leeches
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Bobcats
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Powering Ball Lightning
One ring around them all
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Surprise Visitor
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Asp
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Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Pluto's New Moons
Unveiling Titan
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Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
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Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Robots on the Road, Again
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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Life on the Down Low

There are few places that scientists haven't explored. In their searches for exotic life on Earth, researchers have ventured into even the driest deserts and the steamiest jungles. But conditions in the deep ocean are so extreme that very little is known about life at the bottom of the sea. The deep sea is one of Earth's last frontiers. Now, a team of scientists from eight countries has completed the first survey of life in the deep waters off Antarctica. The team worked aboard a German icebreaker called Polarstern. An icebreaker is a special ship that can withstand strong storms and push through ice on the water's surface. To catch deep-sea creatures, the team lowered a scoop to the ocean floor. It took 6 to 8 hours to lower and raise the scoop just once. The sampling sites were up to 4 miles below the ocean's surface. The effort was worthwhile. Before this expedition, researchers had thought that few creatures would be able to live in the harsh Antarctic ocean conditions. They thought deep-sea life would be less diverse than life in warmer waters. But the scientists were in for a surprise. They found unexpected diversity among deep-sea creatures. What's more, many of these creatures had never before been seen. For example, of the 674 species of isopods picked up by the team, 585 were new to science. (Isopods are a type of crustacean that includes pill bugs, little grey bugs found in many gardens.) That's more new isopod species than have been found in shallower Antarctic waters in the entire past century. Researchers also found other surprises, including carnivorous (meat-eating) sponges. The sponges and most of the other bottom dwellers that the researchers found were largely white. No light reaches such depths, so most are blind. How do these organisms survive in the frigid, inky-black waters? First of all, their bodies are specially adapted to the cold. And when it comes to food, many are scavengers. Their diets consist mainly of debris (little pieces of carcasses and food excreted by other animals) that drifts down from above. Scientists call this debris "marine snow." By the time some of this debris gets to these deep-water creatures, it's already made its way through the bodies of two or three other sea creatures, the researchers say. Many questions remain about how the creatures can survive in such harsh conditions. The deep-sea dwellers collected by the team may provide answers. The data will also help scientists figure out how ocean species migrate and how their ecosystems develop. There's a lot of ocean left to explore!óJ.L. Pegg

Life on the Down Low
Life on the Down Low








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