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Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
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Nice Chimps
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Girls are cool for school
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Atom Hauler
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Graphene's superstrength
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Earth
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Earth from the inside out
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Power of the Wind
Giant snakes invading North America
Food Web Woes
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Traces of Ancient Campfires
Stonehenge Settlement
The Taming of the Cat
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Chew for Health
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Food for Life
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Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Taste Messenger
A New Touch
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Praying Mantis
Daddy Long Legs
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Seal
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Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
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Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
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Seeds of the Future
Nature's Alphabet
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Cobras
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Space and Astronomy
A Great Ball of Fire
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Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
A Satellite of Your Own
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Charged cars that would charge
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Watering the Air
Warmest Year on Record
Recipe for a Hurricane
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Lice

Lice (singular: louse) (order: Phthiraptera) are an order of over 3,000 species of wingless parasitic insects. They are obligate ectoparasites of every mammalian and avian order, with the notable exception of Monotremata (the duck-billed platypus and the echidna or spiny anteater) and Chiroptera (bats). A New Hairdo: A louse egg is commonly called a nit. Lice attach their eggs to their host's hair with specialized saliva which results in a bond that is very difficult to separate without specialized products. A nit comb is a comb with very fine close teeth that is used to scrape nits off the hair. Lice Specialization: Lice are highly specialized based on the host species and many species specifically only feed on certain areas of their host's body. As lice spend their whole life on the host they have developed adaptations which enable them to maintain a close contact with the host. These adaptations are reflected in their size (0.5 mm to 8 mm), stout legs, and claws which are adapted to cling tightly to hair, fur and feathers, wingless and dorsoventrally flattened. Lice feed on skin (epidermal) debris, feather parts, sebaceous secretions and blood. A louse's color varies from pale beige to dark gray; however, if feeding on blood, it may become considerably darker.

Lice
Lice








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