Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
How to Fly Like a Bat
Behavior
Video Game Violence
Homework blues
Supersonic Splash
Birds
A Meal Plan for Birds
Pigeons
Woodpecker
Chemistry and Materials
Graphene's superstrength
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Supersonic Splash
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Hubble trouble doubled
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
A Dino King's Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Springing forward
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Environment
Where rivers run uphill
A Change in Leaf Color
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Chicken of the Sea
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Whale Sharks
Codfish
Piranha
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Chocolate Rules
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Invertebrates
Giant Squid
Crustaceans
Starfish
Mammals
Rats
Blue Whales
Elephants
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Einstein's Skateboard
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Getting the dirt on carbon
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Caimans
Anacondas
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Whole Lot of Nothing
No Fat Stars
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Recipe for a Hurricane
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Lice

Lice (singular: louse) (order: Phthiraptera) are an order of over 3,000 species of wingless parasitic insects. They are obligate ectoparasites of every mammalian and avian order, with the notable exception of Monotremata (the duck-billed platypus and the echidna or spiny anteater) and Chiroptera (bats). A New Hairdo: A louse egg is commonly called a nit. Lice attach their eggs to their host's hair with specialized saliva which results in a bond that is very difficult to separate without specialized products. A nit comb is a comb with very fine close teeth that is used to scrape nits off the hair. Lice Specialization: Lice are highly specialized based on the host species and many species specifically only feed on certain areas of their host's body. As lice spend their whole life on the host they have developed adaptations which enable them to maintain a close contact with the host. These adaptations are reflected in their size (0.5 mm to 8 mm), stout legs, and claws which are adapted to cling tightly to hair, fur and feathers, wingless and dorsoventrally flattened. Lice feed on skin (epidermal) debris, feather parts, sebaceous secretions and blood. A louse's color varies from pale beige to dark gray; however, if feeding on blood, it may become considerably darker.

Lice
Lice








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