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Armadillo
A Wild Ferret Rise
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Swine flu goes global
Island of Hope
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It's a Small E-mail World After All
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Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
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South America's sticky tar pits
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Earth
Deep History
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Springing forward
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Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
The Wolf and the Cow
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Big Woman of the Distant Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Fish
Hagfish
Nurse Sharks
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Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Recipe for Health
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
Pronouns
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
It's a Math World for Animals
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Disease Detectives
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Butterflies
Flies
Mammals
Weasels
Cape Buffalo
African Elephants
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Black Hole Journey
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Plants Travel Wind Highways
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Anacondas
Cobras
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
Holes in Martian moon mystery
A Family in Space
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Shape Shifting
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Robots on the Road, Again
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Change in Climate
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Lice

Lice (singular: louse) (order: Phthiraptera) are an order of over 3,000 species of wingless parasitic insects. They are obligate ectoparasites of every mammalian and avian order, with the notable exception of Monotremata (the duck-billed platypus and the echidna or spiny anteater) and Chiroptera (bats). A New Hairdo: A louse egg is commonly called a nit. Lice attach their eggs to their host's hair with specialized saliva which results in a bond that is very difficult to separate without specialized products. A nit comb is a comb with very fine close teeth that is used to scrape nits off the hair. Lice Specialization: Lice are highly specialized based on the host species and many species specifically only feed on certain areas of their host's body. As lice spend their whole life on the host they have developed adaptations which enable them to maintain a close contact with the host. These adaptations are reflected in their size (0.5 mm to 8 mm), stout legs, and claws which are adapted to cling tightly to hair, fur and feathers, wingless and dorsoventrally flattened. Lice feed on skin (epidermal) debris, feather parts, sebaceous secretions and blood. A louse's color varies from pale beige to dark gray; however, if feeding on blood, it may become considerably darker.

Lice
Lice








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