Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Flush-Free Fertilizer
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Toads
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Putting a Mouse on Pause
A Wild Ferret Rise
Fishy Sounds
Behavior
Brain cells take a break
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Making light of sleep
Birds
Parakeets
Albatrosses
Hawks
Chemistry and Materials
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Screaming for Ice Cream
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Getting in Touch with Touch
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Living Fossil
Dinosaurs Grow Up
A Dino King's Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Quick Quake Alerts
Deep History
Environment
Island Extinctions
Bald Eagles Forever
Inspired by Nature
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
Writing on eggshells
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Hagfish
Freshwater Fish
Bull Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Math of the World
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
A Long Haul
Dreaming makes perfect
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Termites
Snails
Crabs
Mammals
African Camels
Tigers
African Hyenas
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Electric Backpack
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Seeds of the Future
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Crocodiles
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
Roving the Red Planet
A Planet from the Early Universe
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Revving Up Green Machines
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Warmest Year on Record
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Lhasa Apsos

The Lhasa Apso is a small breed of dog originally from Tibet. They were used as watchdogs inside Tibetan monasteries for over 1200 years, for which they are uniquely suited with keen intelligence, acute hearing, and instincts for identifying friends from strangers. They are generally 10 to 11 inches at the withers and weigh between 12 and 18 lbs. Lhasas should have dark brown eyes with black pigmentation on eye rims and a black nose. They have a hard straight outer coat with soft undercoat (depending upon weather conditions) which comes in a variety of different colors. The tail should curl up over the back. Having been bred to be sentinel or watch dogs, Lhasa Apsos tend to be alert and have a keen sense of hearing with a rich, sonorous bark that belies their size (some are known as "singers"). They are bright and outgoing, but some tend toward wariness of strangers. Wariness does not mean unwarranted aggressiveness but having a discerning attitude towards strangers; people approaching the dog simply need to show that they are a friend. However, many Lhasas are quite friendly from the first introduction. If not properly socialized, some may become aggressive or overly shy toward strangers. Lhasas also have a very good memory and will hold grudges and often show dislike to the same people throughout their life if treated wrongly by them at a young age. They are very affectionate but can also be very possessive, independent and bossy little dogs. With their intellect and sensitivity, Lhasas are not necessarily well suited to children. It is believed that the breed originated from Lhasa, the capital of Tibet (hence the name) around 800 BC. These dogs were raised by the aristocratic part of the Tibetan society and by Tibetan monks in the monasteries. They were very valuable both spiritually and materialistically. To be presented with a Lhasa Apso was to be blessed with good fortune. Lhasa Apsos have adopted an incentive to be wary of strangers from their owners, who, due to the geographical location of Tibet, were also cautious of outsiders. The heavy coat of Lhasas can also be explained by the geographical features of Tibet: the temperature frequently drops below freezing thus making it hard for a dog to survive without sufficient insulation. Lhasas were rarely groomed by their owners thus allowing the breed to adapt to the harsh weather. In 1901 Mrs. A. McLaren Morrison brought the Lhasa Apso to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland where it was registered as an official breed in The Kennel Club in 1902. World War I had a devastating effect on the breed. It has been reported that as few as 30 Lhasa Apsos may have existed in Tibet at that time. The original American pair was a gift from Thubten Gyatso, 13th Dalai Lama to C. Suydam Cutting, arriving in the United States in the early 1930s. The American Kennel Club officially accepted the breed in 1935 in the Terrier group, and in 1959 transferred the breed to the Non-Sporting group. Recently, DNA Analysis has identified the Lhasa Apso as one of the 14 most ancient dog breeds.

Lhasa Apsos
Lhasa Apsos








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™