Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
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Monkeys Count
From Chimps to People
Eyes on the Depths
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Newly named fish crawls and hops
How Much Babies Know
Puberty gone wild
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Blue Jays
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Batteries built by Viruses
When frog gender flips
Makeup Science
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Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Graphene's superstrength
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Warmest Year on Record
A Great Quake Coming?
Environment
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Ready, unplug, drive
Indoor ozone stopper
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Mahi-Mahi
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Sturgeons
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
The mercury in that tuna
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Corals
Scorpions
Ticks
Mammals
Weasels and Kin
Orangutans
Rabbits
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
IceCube Science
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
The algae invasion
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Turtles
Box Turtles
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
World of Three Suns
The two faces of Mars
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
Riding Sunlight
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Middle school science adventures
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
A Dire Shortage of Water
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Krill

Krill are small, shrimp-like ocean crustaceans. These pink, translucent animals congregate in large, dense masses called "swarms" or "clouds," that turn areas of the ocean's surface pink. Krill are very important in the food web since many animals eat them. Krill have a hard exoskeleton, many legs (used for swimming and gathering food), and a segmented body. Females produce almost 1,000 eggs each summer; the eggs are laid at the surface, but fall to great depths. The hatchlings swim back to the surface to feed. Like all crustaceans, krill molt their exoskeleton as they grow. Species: There are about 85 species of krill, ranging in size from less than 0.5 inch (1 cm) up to 5.5 inches (14 cm) long. The dominant krill in the southern polar oceans is the Antarctic krill, which is up to 2.3 inches (6 cm) long and weighs about 0.035 ounces (1 g). Antarctic krill have a life span of about 5 to 10 years. Antarctic Krill is considered to be a keystone species, an organism upon which very many Antarctic predators depend. Krill eat phytoplankton, single-celled plants that float in the seas near the surface. Krill spend their days in the dark depths of the ocean (about 320 feet = 100 m deep), safe from their major predators (like whales and sea birds). They swim to the surface each night to eat, but can fast for up to 200 days, shrinking in size during that time.

Krill
Krill








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