Agriculture
Watering the Air
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
Monkey Math
How to Silence a Cricket
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Behavior
Bringing fish back up to size
Brainy bees know two from three
The Snappy Lingo of Instant Messages
Birds
Robins
Owls
Ospreys
Chemistry and Materials
The newest superheavy in town
Hair Detectives
Watching out for vultures
Computers
Music of the Future
New eyes to scan the skies
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Dinosaur Dig
Digging Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Surf Watch
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
A Change in Leaf Color
Ready, unplug, drive
A Change in Time
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Your inner Neandertal
A Long Haul
Fish
Catfish
Lungfish
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
The Color of Health
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exam Preparation
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Monkeys Count
Math Naturals
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
Disease Detectives
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Crustaceans
Scorpions
Spiders
Mammals
Donkeys
Killer Whales
Koalas
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Making the most of a meal
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Alligators
Box Turtles
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
A Moon's Icy Spray
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Killers from Outer Space
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Smart Windows
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Flying the Hyper Skies
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Add your Article

Kookaburras

Kookaburras are very large, terrestrial kingfishers native to Australia and New Guinea. Some were introduced into New Zealand between 1866 and 1880, but only those saved on Kawau Island by Sir George Grey survived. Descendants are still to be found there today. Plumage: The male Laughing Kookaburra can be easily distinguished from the female by the blue hues on his wing feathers and darker blue on his tail feathers. The female on the other hand has a small amount of aqua on her wing feathers, but no blue on her tail feathers. Kooky Kookaburras: Kookaburras are best known for their unmistakable call which is uncannily like loud, echoing human laughter good-natured if rather hysterical merriment in the case of the well-known Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae), maniacial, almost insane cackling in the case of the slightly smaller Blue-winged Kookaburra (Dacelo leachii). Kookaburra Communication: Kookaburras occupy woodland territories in loose family groups, and their laughter serves the same purpose as a great many other bird calls: to demarcate territorial borders. The Laughing Kookaburra also "laughs" to greet its mate after periods of absences. It can be heard at any time of day but most frequently shortly after dawn, and especially when the colour drains from the forest after sunset. Laughing in the Trees: One bird starts with a low, hiccupping chuckle, then throws its head back in raucous laughter: often several others join in. If a rival tribe is within earshot and replies, the whole family soon gathers to fill the bush with ringing laughter. Hearing kookaburras in full voice is one of the more extraordinary experiences of the Australian bush; something even locals cannot ignore, and that visitors, unless forewarned, can be quite terrified by. Hunting: Kookaburras hunt much as other kingfishers (or indeed robins) do: by perching on a convenient branch or wire and waiting patiently for prey to pass by: mice and similar-sized small mammals, large insects, lizards, small birds and nestlings, and most famously, snakes. Small prey are preferred, but kookaburras not infrequently take surprisingly large creatures, including venomous snakes a good deal longer than the bird itself. All in the Family: Most species of Kookaburra tend to live in family units, with offspring helping the parents hunt and care for the next generation of offspring. Kookaburras in the Backyard: The Laughing Kookaburra frequently inhabits suburban gardens and are so accustomed to humans that they will quite often eat out of your hand. It is not recommended to feed them however as it interferes with their basic dietary requirements and can lead to disease. Woo Her With Food: During mating season, the Laughing Kookaburra indulges in behaviour similar to that of a Wattle Bird. The female adopts a begging posture and vocalises like a young bird. The male then offers her his current catch accompanied with an "oo oo oo" sound. They start breeding around October/November. If the first clutch fails, they will continue breeding into the summer months. Nest and Nestlings: They generally lay three eggs at about 2 day intervals. If the food supply is not adequate the third egg will be smaller and the third chick will also be smaller and at a disadvantage to its larger siblings. Chicks have a hook on the upper mandible, which disappears by the time of fledging. If the food supply to the chicks is not adequate the chicks will quarrel and the hook can be used as a weapon and the smallest chick can be killed by its larger siblings. If food is plentiful the parent birds spend more time brooding the chicks and so the chicks are not able to fight. Species Rivalry: Unusually for close relatives, the Laughing and Blue-winged species are direct competitors in the area where their ranges overlap. This suggests that the two species, though having common stock, evolved in isolation (possibly during a period when Australia and New Guinea were more distant see Australia-New Guinea) and were only brought back into contact in relatively recent geological times.

Kookaburras
Kookaburras








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™