Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Salamanders
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Cacophony Acoustics
Putting a Mouse on Pause
Behavior
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Swine flu goes global
Between a rock and a wet place
Birds
Swans
Doves
Turkeys
Chemistry and Materials
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Atom Hauler
The science of disappearing
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Galaxies on the go
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Middle school science adventures
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Riding to Earth's Core
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Environment
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Improving the Camel
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Finding the Past
A Big Discovery about Little People
The Taming of the Cat
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Electric Catfish
Electric Eel
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Healing Honey
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Setting a Prime Number Record
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Hear, Hear
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Tapeworms
Scallops
Crawfish
Mammals
Golden Retrievers
Pomeranians
Scottish Folds
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Speedy stars
Dreams of Floating in Space
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Turtles
Lizards
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
A Moon's Icy Spray
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Revving Up Green Machines
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Kiwis

A kiwi is any of the species of small flightless birds endemic to New Zealand of the genus Apteryx (the only genus in family Apterygidae). At around the size of a domestic chicken, kiwi are by far the smallest living ratites. Several kiwi species are endangered. The kiwi is also a national symbol for New Zealand. Honorary Mammal: Prior to the arrival of humans in the 13th century or earlier, New Zealand's only endemic mammals were three species of bat, and the ecological niches that in other parts of the world were filled by creatures as diverse as horses, wolves and mice were taken up by birds (and, to a lesser extent, reptiles). Swiss Army Beak: Kiwi are shy nocturnal creatures with a highly developed sense of smell and, most unusual in a bird, nostrils at the end of their long bill. They feed by thrusting the bill into the ground in search of worms, insects, and other invertebrates; they also take fruit and, if the opportunity arises, small crayfish, amphibians and eels. Flightless and Loving it: Their adaptation to a terrestrial life is extensive: like all ratites they have no keel on the breastbone to anchor wing muscles, and barely any wings either: the vestiges are so small that they are invisible under the kiwi's bristly, hair-like, two-branched feathers. While birds generally have hollow bones to save weight and make flight practicable, kiwi have marrow, in the style of mammals. With no constraints on weight from flight requirements, some Brown Kiwi females carry and lay a single 450 g egg. Family Ties: It was long presumed that the kiwi's closest relatives were the other New Zealand ratites, the moa. However recent DNA studies indicate that the Ostrich is more closely related to the moa and the kiwi's closest relatives are the Emu and the cassowaries. This theory suggests that the kiwi's ancestors arrived in New Zealand from elsewhere in Australasia well after the moa. According to British scientists, the kiwi may be an ancient import from Australia. Researchers of Oxford University have found DNA evidence connected to Australia's Emu and the Ostrich of Africa. Upon examining DNA from New Zealand's native moa, they believe that the kiwi is more closely related to its Australian cousins. Kiwi Couples: After an initial meeting during mating season (June to March), kiwi usually live as monogamous couples. The pair will meet in the nesting burrow every few days and call to each other at night. These relationships have been known to last for up to 20 years. Impressive Eggs: Kiwi eggs can weigh up to one quarter the size of the female. Usually only one egg is laid. Although the Kiwi is about the size of a domestic chicken, it is able to lay eggs that are up to ten times larger than a chicken's egg. Currently there are three accepted species, one of which has two sub-species: The largest species is the Great Spotted Kiwi, Apteryx haastii, which stands about 450 mm high and weighs about 3.3 kg. (Males about 2.4 kg) It has grey-brown plumage with lighter bands. The female lays just one egg, with both sexes incubating. Population is estimated to be over 20,000, distributed through the more mountainous parts of northwest Nelson, the northern West Coast, and the Southern Alps. The very small Little Spotted Kiwi, Apteryx owenii is unable to survive predation by imported pigs, stoats and cats and is extinct on the mainland and the most threatened of all kiwi. About 1350 remain on Kapiti Island and it has been introduced to other predator-free islands and appears to be becoming established with about 50 'Little Spots' on each island. A docile bird the size of a bantam, it stands 250 mm high and the female weighs 1.3 kg. She lays one egg which is incubated by the male. The Brown Kiwi, Apteryx mantelli is widespread in the northern two-thirds of the North Island and with about 35,000 remaining is the most common kiwi. Females stand about 400 mm high and weigh about 2.8 kg, the males about 2.2 kg. The North Island Brown has demonstrated a remarkable resilience: it adapts to a wide range of habitats, even non-native forests and some farmland. The plumage is streaky red-brown and spiky. The female usually lays two eggs, which are incubated by the male. The Okarito Brown Kiwi or Rowi, Apteryx rowi, is a recently identified species, slightly smaller, with a greyish tinge to the plumage and sometimes white facial feathers. Females lay as many as three eggs in a season, each one in a different nest. Male and female both incubate. These Kiwi are distributed in the South Island of New Zealand. The Southern Tokoeka, Apteryx australis australis, relatively common species of kiwi known from southwest South Island (Fiordland) that occurs at most elevations. It is approximately the size of the Great Spotted Kiwi and is similar in appearance to the Brown Kiwi but its plumage is lighter in colour. The Stewart Island Tokoeka, Apteryx australis lawryi, is a subspecies of Southern Tokoeka known from Stewart Island. The Haast Tokoeka, Apteryx n. sp. (?fusca), is the rarest species of kiwi with only about 300 individuals. It was identified as a distinct form in 1993. It only occurs in a restricted area in South Island's Haast Range at an altitude of 1,500 m. This form is distinguished by a more strongly downcurved bill and more rufous plumage.

Kiwis
Kiwis








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™