Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Animals
From Chimps to People
Lives of a Mole Rat
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
Behavior
Flower family knows its roots
Fear Matters
Pain Expectations
Birds
Storks
Kingfishers
Seagulls
Chemistry and Materials
Fog Buster
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Flytrap Machine
Computers
Hubble trouble doubled
Batteries built by Viruses
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet the new dinos
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Greener Diet
Environment
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Seahorses
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Chocolate Rules
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
A Long Trek to Asia
Attacking Asthma
Invertebrates
Hermit Crabs
Praying Mantis
Lobsters
Mammals
Cows
Sun Bear
Moose
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Electric Backpack
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Springing forward
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Geckos
Gila Monsters
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Burst Busters
Killers from Outer Space
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Middle school science adventures
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Catching Some Rays
Watering the Air
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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