Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Little Bee Brains That Could
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Behavior
Listen and Learn
Night of the living ants
Swine flu goes global
Birds
Kookaburras
Birds We Eat
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
When frog gender flips
Computers
Getting in Touch with Touch
Earth from the inside out
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Mini T. rex
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Warmest Year on Record
Surf Watch
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Environment
Food Web Woes
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Acid Snails
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
A Long Haul
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
Catfish
Electric Eel
Trout
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Making good, brown fat
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Math Naturals
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Dragonflies
Walking Sticks
Worms
Mammals
African Jackal
Narwhals
Baboons
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Road Bumps
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Springing forward
A Change in Leaf Color
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Snakes
Anacondas
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
An Earthlike Planet
Asteroid Lost and Found
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Arctic Melt
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.—E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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