Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Springing forward
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Salamanders
Animals
Armadillo
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Behavior
From dipping to fishing
Math is a real brain bender
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Birds
Dodos
Chicken
Woodpecker
Chemistry and Materials
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Popping to Perfection
Pencil Thin
Computers
A Light Delay
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Riding to Earth's Core
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Environment
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Indoor ozone stopper
To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
Of Lice and Old Clothes
A Long Haul
Fish
Skates
Catfish
Mako Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Subject and Verb Agreement
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Spit Power
A New Touch
Invertebrates
Crawfish
Lobsters
Flatworms
Mammals
Caribou
Grizzly Bear
Bonobos
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Surprise Visitor
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Gila Monsters
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Burst Busters
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Robots on a Rocky Road
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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