Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Springing forward
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
Deep Krill
Ants on Stilts
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Behavior
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Wired for Math
Birds
Chicken
Rheas
Cassowaries
Chemistry and Materials
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
The newest superheavy in town
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Computers
Look into My Eyes
Lighting goes digital
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Earth
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Shrinking Glaciers
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
Acid Snails
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Fakes in the museum
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Catfish
Carp
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Leeches
Sea Anemones
Spiders
Mammals
Cornish Rex
Great Danes
Orangutans
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
Surprise Visitor
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Lizards
Anacondas
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Dark Galaxy
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
A Clean Getaway
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Robots on the Road, Again
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Watering the Air
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.—E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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