Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Watering the Air
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
A Wild Ferret Rise
Missing Moose
Behavior
A brain-boosting video game
Dino-bite!
Double take
Birds
Pheasants
Seagulls
Albatrosses
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
Small but WISE
Revving Up Green Machines
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Troubles with Hubble
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Tiny Pterodactyl
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Life under Ice
Plastic-munching microbes
Environment
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Catching Some Rays
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Untangling Human Origins
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Tiger Sharks
Hammerhead Sharks
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Yummy bugs
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Heart Revival
What the appendix is good for
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Butterflies
Spiders
Scallops
Mammals
Echidnas
African Hippopotamus
Baboons
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Speedy stars
Project Music
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Gila Monsters
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Solving a Sedna Mystery
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Roving the Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Crime Lab
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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