Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Assembling the Tree of Life
Life on the Down Low
Behavior
Mice sense each other's fear
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Birds
Mockingbirds
Backyard Birds
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
Watching out for vultures
Hair Detectives
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Look into My Eyes
Fingerprint Evidence
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Digging for Ancient DNA
Downsized Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
The Rise of Yellowstone
Environment
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Catching Some Rays
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Seahorses
Manta Rays
Carp
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Chocolate Rules
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math is a real brain bender
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Dust Mites
Roundworms
Caterpillars
Mammals
Dalmatians
Dolphins
Yorkshire Terriers
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Seeds of the Future
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Springing forward
Reptiles
Pythons
Turtles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
An Earthlike Planet
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Machine Copy
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on a Rocky Road
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Arctic Melt
Watering the Air
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.—E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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