Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Watering the Air
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Crocodile Hearts
Sleepless at Sea
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Behavior
The Electric Brain
Internet Generation
Copycat Monkeys
Birds
Emus
Pelicans
Pheasants
Chemistry and Materials
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
The science of disappearing
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Middle school science adventures
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Supersight for a Dino King
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
A Great Quake Coming?
Earth's Poles in Peril
Environment
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Shrinking Fish
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
A Plankhouse Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Bass
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Chew for Health
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Mastering The GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Monkeys Count
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Attacking Asthma
Invertebrates
Moths
Dust Mites
Lobsters
Mammals
Coyotes
Spectacled Bear
Rabbits
Parents
How children learn
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Black Hole Journey
Speedy stars
Plants
Making the most of a meal
The algae invasion
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Turtles
Snakes
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Planning for Mars
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Riding Sunlight
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
How to Fly Like a Bat
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Arctic Melt
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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