Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Making the most of a meal
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Gliders in the Family
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
Cool Penguins
Behavior
Brainy bees know two from three
Homework blues
Storing Memories before Bedtime
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Kingfishers
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Flytrap Machine
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Music of the Future
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Galaxies far, far, far away
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Mini T. rex
Digging for Ancient DNA
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Coral Gardens
A Volcano Wakes Up
Unnatural Disasters
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Bald Eagles Forever
What is groundwater
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Flashlight Fishes
Megamouth Sharks
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Recipe for Health
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Invertebrates
Caterpillars
Scorpions
Krill
Mammals
Grizzly Bear
Chihuahuas
Whales
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
A Change in Leaf Color
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Anacondas
Pythons
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Asteroid Lost and Found
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Dancing with Robots
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Earth's Poles in Peril
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.—E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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