Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Making the most of a meal
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Toads
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
From Chimps to People
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Behavior
Babies Prove Sound Learners
Seeing red means danger ahead
Homework blues
Birds
Kookaburras
Ospreys
Owls
Chemistry and Materials
Lighting goes digital
Music of the Future
The science of disappearing
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Play for Science
Troubles with Hubble
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Deep Drilling at Sea
Bugs with Gas
Shrinking Glaciers
Environment
Indoor ozone stopper
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Blooming Jellies
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Swordfish
Saltwater Fish
Tilapia
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
The mercury in that tuna
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Losing with Heads or Tails
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Bees
Grasshoppers
Daddy Long Legs
Mammals
Capybaras
Sun Bear
Quolls
Parents
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Black Hole Journey
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
A Giant Flower's New Family
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Alligators
Komodo Dragons
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Chaos Among the Planets
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Crime Lab
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Revving Up Green Machines
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
A Dire Shortage of Water
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™