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Silk’s superpowers
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The Electric Brain
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Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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Fungus Hunt
Missing Tigers in India
An Ocean View's Downside
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The Essence of Celery
Strong Bones for Life
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The Annual GSAT Scholarships
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March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
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GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
It's a Math World for Animals
Math of the World
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A Long Trek to Asia
What the appendix is good for
A Fix for Injured Knees
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African Jackal
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Lion
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
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Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
The Particle Zoo
Plants
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Stalking Plants by Scent
Farms sprout in cities
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Asp
Black Mamba
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Asteroid Moons
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
A Whole Lot of Nothing
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Shape Shifting
Toy Challenge
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
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Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
How to Fly Like a Bat
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Invisibility Ring

Scientists can't yet make an invisibility cloak like the one that Harry Potter uses. But, for the first time, they've constructed a simple cloaking device that makes itself and something placed inside it invisible to microwaves. When a person "sees" an object, his or her eye senses many different waves of visible light as they bounce off the object. The eye and brain then work together to organize these sensations and reconstruct the object's original shape. So, to make an object invisible, scientists have to keep waves from bouncing off it. And they have to make sure the object casts no shadow. Otherwise, the absence of reflected light on one side would give the object away. Invisibility isn't possible yet with waves of light that the human eye can see. But it is now possible with microwaves. Like visible light, microwaves are a form of radiant energy. They are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, which also includes radio waves, infrared light, ultraviolet rays, X rays, and gamma rays. The wavelengths of microwaves are shorter than those of radio waves but longer than those of visible light. The scientists' new "invisibility device" is the size of a drink coaster and shaped like a ring. The ring is made of a special material with unusual abilities. When microwaves strike the ring, very few bounce off it. Instead, they pass through the ring, which bends the waves all the way around until they reach the opposite side. The waves then return to their original paths. To a detector set up to receive microwaves on the other side of the ring, it looks as if the waves never changed their paths—as if there were no object in the way! So, the ring is effectively invisible. When the researchers put a small copper loop inside the ring, it, too, is nearly invisible. However, the cloaking device and anything inside it do cast a pale shadow. And the device works only for microwaves, not for visible light or any other kind of electromagnetic radiation. So, Harry Potter's invisibility cloak doesn't have any real competition yet.—C. Gramling

Invisibility Ring
Invisibility Ring








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