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A Whale's Amazing Tooth
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Brain cells take a break
Baby Talk
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Flightless Birds
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Atom Hauler
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Two monkeys see a more colorful world
The Shape of the Internet
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Quick Quake Alerts
Earth's Lowly Rumble
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Improving the Camel
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Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
The Taming of the Cat
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Pygmy Sharks
Barracudas
Basking Sharks
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Making good, brown fat
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
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GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Subject and Verb Agreement
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Prime Time for Cicadas
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Remembering Facts and Feelings
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From Stem Cell to Any Cell
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Mosquitos
Daddy Long Legs
Mammals
Walrus
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Rhinoceros
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Speedy stars
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Farms sprout in cities
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
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Garter Snakes
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
A Change in Climate
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Invisibility Ring

Scientists can't yet make an invisibility cloak like the one that Harry Potter uses. But, for the first time, they've constructed a simple cloaking device that makes itself and something placed inside it invisible to microwaves. When a person "sees" an object, his or her eye senses many different waves of visible light as they bounce off the object. The eye and brain then work together to organize these sensations and reconstruct the object's original shape. So, to make an object invisible, scientists have to keep waves from bouncing off it. And they have to make sure the object casts no shadow. Otherwise, the absence of reflected light on one side would give the object away. Invisibility isn't possible yet with waves of light that the human eye can see. But it is now possible with microwaves. Like visible light, microwaves are a form of radiant energy. They are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, which also includes radio waves, infrared light, ultraviolet rays, X rays, and gamma rays. The wavelengths of microwaves are shorter than those of radio waves but longer than those of visible light. The scientists' new "invisibility device" is the size of a drink coaster and shaped like a ring. The ring is made of a special material with unusual abilities. When microwaves strike the ring, very few bounce off it. Instead, they pass through the ring, which bends the waves all the way around until they reach the opposite side. The waves then return to their original paths. To a detector set up to receive microwaves on the other side of the ring, it looks as if the waves never changed their paths—as if there were no object in the way! So, the ring is effectively invisible. When the researchers put a small copper loop inside the ring, it, too, is nearly invisible. However, the cloaking device and anything inside it do cast a pale shadow. And the device works only for microwaves, not for visible light or any other kind of electromagnetic radiation. So, Harry Potter's invisibility cloak doesn't have any real competition yet.—C. Gramling

Invisibility Ring
Invisibility Ring








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