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Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
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Getting the dirt on carbon
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New twists for phantom limbs
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
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A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
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Stonehenge Settlement
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How Super Are Superfruits?
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Detecting True Art
It's a Math World for Animals
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
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Attacking Asthma
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
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Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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Black Hole Journey
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Invisibility Ring
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Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Fastest Plant on Earth
City Trees Beat Country Trees
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Copperhead Snakes
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Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Killers from Outer Space
Sounds of Titan
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Where rivers run uphill
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Invisibility Ring

Scientists can't yet make an invisibility cloak like the one that Harry Potter uses. But, for the first time, they've constructed a simple cloaking device that makes itself and something placed inside it invisible to microwaves. When a person "sees" an object, his or her eye senses many different waves of visible light as they bounce off the object. The eye and brain then work together to organize these sensations and reconstruct the object's original shape. So, to make an object invisible, scientists have to keep waves from bouncing off it. And they have to make sure the object casts no shadow. Otherwise, the absence of reflected light on one side would give the object away. Invisibility isn't possible yet with waves of light that the human eye can see. But it is now possible with microwaves. Like visible light, microwaves are a form of radiant energy. They are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, which also includes radio waves, infrared light, ultraviolet rays, X rays, and gamma rays. The wavelengths of microwaves are shorter than those of radio waves but longer than those of visible light. The scientists' new "invisibility device" is the size of a drink coaster and shaped like a ring. The ring is made of a special material with unusual abilities. When microwaves strike the ring, very few bounce off it. Instead, they pass through the ring, which bends the waves all the way around until they reach the opposite side. The waves then return to their original paths. To a detector set up to receive microwaves on the other side of the ring, it looks as if the waves never changed their paths—as if there were no object in the way! So, the ring is effectively invisible. When the researchers put a small copper loop inside the ring, it, too, is nearly invisible. However, the cloaking device and anything inside it do cast a pale shadow. And the device works only for microwaves, not for visible light or any other kind of electromagnetic radiation. So, Harry Potter's invisibility cloak doesn't have any real competition yet.—C. Gramling

Invisibility Ring
Invisibility Ring








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