Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Walktopus
Deep Krill
Behavior
Fish needs see-through head
A Recipe for Happiness
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Birds
Doves
Peafowl
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Watching out for vultures
When frog gender flips
Computers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Troubles with Hubble
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging Dinos
Feathered Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Riding to Earth's Core
Earth's Poles in Peril
Life trapped under a glacier
Environment
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Flu river
Improving the Camel
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Fish
Megamouth Sharks
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Sponges' secret weapon
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Mastering The GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Electricity's Spark of Life
Hear, Hear
Invertebrates
Spiders
Moths
Praying Mantis
Mammals
Killer Whales
Rhinoceros
Elk
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Einstein's Skateboard
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Sweet, Sticky Science
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Lizards
Snakes
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Weaving with Light
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Ready, unplug, drive
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

Invisibility Ring

Scientists can't yet make an invisibility cloak like the one that Harry Potter uses. But, for the first time, they've constructed a simple cloaking device that makes itself and something placed inside it invisible to microwaves. When a person "sees" an object, his or her eye senses many different waves of visible light as they bounce off the object. The eye and brain then work together to organize these sensations and reconstruct the object's original shape. So, to make an object invisible, scientists have to keep waves from bouncing off it. And they have to make sure the object casts no shadow. Otherwise, the absence of reflected light on one side would give the object away. Invisibility isn't possible yet with waves of light that the human eye can see. But it is now possible with microwaves. Like visible light, microwaves are a form of radiant energy. They are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, which also includes radio waves, infrared light, ultraviolet rays, X rays, and gamma rays. The wavelengths of microwaves are shorter than those of radio waves but longer than those of visible light. The scientists' new "invisibility device" is the size of a drink coaster and shaped like a ring. The ring is made of a special material with unusual abilities. When microwaves strike the ring, very few bounce off it. Instead, they pass through the ring, which bends the waves all the way around until they reach the opposite side. The waves then return to their original paths. To a detector set up to receive microwaves on the other side of the ring, it looks as if the waves never changed their paths—as if there were no object in the way! So, the ring is effectively invisible. When the researchers put a small copper loop inside the ring, it, too, is nearly invisible. However, the cloaking device and anything inside it do cast a pale shadow. And the device works only for microwaves, not for visible light or any other kind of electromagnetic radiation. So, Harry Potter's invisibility cloak doesn't have any real competition yet.—C. Gramling

Invisibility Ring
Invisibility Ring








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™