Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Watching out for vultures
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Toads
Salamanders
Animals
Clone Wars
Walktopus
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Listen and Learn
Supersonic Splash
Birds
Blue Jays
Falcons
Ospreys
Chemistry and Materials
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Makeup Science
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Computers
Look into My Eyes
Galaxies on the go
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Mini T. rex
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Rocking the House
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
A Volcano Wakes Up
Environment
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Untangling Human Origins
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Great White Shark
Tiger Sharks
Mako Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Healing Honey
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
A Better Flu Shot
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Invertebrates
Sea Anemones
Lice
Mollusks
Mammals
Great Danes
Manatees
Raccoons
Parents
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Dreams of Floating in Space
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Getting the dirt on carbon
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Pythons
Geckos
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Slip-sliding away
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Planets on the Edge
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Riding Sunlight
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Watering the Air
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Insects

The largest and most diverse animals on earth, insects encompass over 925,000 different species. Found worldwide, in almost any climent and habitat, they share the common characteristics of a having an invertebrate (spineless) body divided into three parts (head, thorax and abdomen), with six legs, and a hard outer covering called an exoskeleton. They range in size from less than a millimeter to over 18 centimeters, and come in an endless variety of shapes and colors. Some insects include beetles, bees and wasps, flies, butterflies and moths. Insects are invertebrates in a class referred to Insecta. They are the most numerous and most widespread arthropods. Insects are the most diverse group of animals on the earth, with around 925,000 species described—more than all other animal groups combined: Insects may be found in nearly all environments on the planet, although only a small number of species have adapted to life in the oceans, where crustaceans tend to predominate. There are approximately 5,000 dragonfly species, 2,000 praying mantis, 20,000 grasshopper, 170,000 butterfly and moth, 120,000 fly, 82,000 true bug, 350,000 beetle, and 110,000 bee and ant species described to date. Estimates of the total number of current species, including those not yet known to science, range from two to thirty million, with most authorities favoring a figure midway between these extremes. The study of insects is called entomology.

Insects
Insects








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™