Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Deep Krill
Missing Moose
Behavior
Making Sense of Scents
Swedish Rhapsody
Honeybees do the wave
Birds
Falcons
Crows
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
Sticky Silky Feet
Hair Detectives
Picture the Smell
Computers
A Light Delay
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Meet your mysterious relative
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Watering the Air
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Pollution Detective
Island Extinctions
Finding the Past
A Big Discovery about Little People
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Piranha
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Chew for Health
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Cell Phone Tattlers
Invertebrates
Fleas
Nautiluses
Worms
Mammals
Baboons
Moles
Felines
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Rattlesnakes
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Unveiling Titan
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Searching for Alien Life
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Where rivers run uphill
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Insect Stowaways

To make this discovery, the scientists had to trudge through a wet salt marsh to dry places where the birds roost. They then had to pick up piles of bird droppings. Thousands of water birds called black-tailed godwits stop at the marsh in Spain every year as they trek from their northern breeding grounds to their winter homes in Africa. As they rest, they eat. After they eat, they poop. Scientists have long known that seeds can survive the strong digestive juices of an animal's stomach. Birds, rodents, and even people eat seeds in one place and plop them out in another. If conditions are just right, the seeds can then take root and grow into new plants. Scientists have also observed snails that hitchhike by sticking to ducks' feet and eggs of tiny brine shrimp and other water animals that survive in bird guts. In the godwit droppings, the researchers were amazed to find bright red larvae called bloodworms. These larvae grow up to be mosquito-like insects called midges. It was the first time that anyone had found living larvae hitchhiking inside the body of an animal. The researchers studied six sets of godwit droppings and found living larvae in three of the sets. In total, they came up with 95 larvae that were still in one piece. Of these, 12 were alive. They hadn't been harmed at all by the digestive systems of the birds. Bugs, guts, and poop are gross on their own. Add them together, and you've got what may be the ickiest news story of the year. Researchers in Spain have found a species of insect larvae that pass through the guts of migrating birds and emerge in the birds' droppings, unharmed. The larvae were probably able to survive the trip because birds don't fully digest their food when they eat a lot. And, when the birds migrate, they tend to gorge themselves frequently. Bloodworms take advantage of this to travel much farther than they could ever get on their own. Poop, it seems, can take you places.—E. Sohn

Insect Stowaways
Insect Stowaways








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™