Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Watching out for vultures
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Toads
Animals
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Fishing for Giant Squid
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Behavior
Mind-reading Machine
Monkeys in the Mirror
The Science Fair Circuit
Birds
Condors
Hummingbirds
Backyard Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Lighting goes digital
Small but WISE
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
The Book of Life
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
A Big, Weird Dino
Mini T. rex
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Coral Gardens
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Environment
Blooming Jellies
Indoor ozone stopper
Food Web Woes
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Sharks
Carp
Swordfish
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Mosquitos
Octopuses
Centipedes
Mammals
Asian Elephants
Quolls
Polar Bear
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Dreams of Floating in Space
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Tortoises
Turtles
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Saturn's Spongy Moon
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Shape Shifting
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Middle school science adventures
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Insect Stowaways

To make this discovery, the scientists had to trudge through a wet salt marsh to dry places where the birds roost. They then had to pick up piles of bird droppings. Thousands of water birds called black-tailed godwits stop at the marsh in Spain every year as they trek from their northern breeding grounds to their winter homes in Africa. As they rest, they eat. After they eat, they poop. Scientists have long known that seeds can survive the strong digestive juices of an animal's stomach. Birds, rodents, and even people eat seeds in one place and plop them out in another. If conditions are just right, the seeds can then take root and grow into new plants. Scientists have also observed snails that hitchhike by sticking to ducks' feet and eggs of tiny brine shrimp and other water animals that survive in bird guts. In the godwit droppings, the researchers were amazed to find bright red larvae called bloodworms. These larvae grow up to be mosquito-like insects called midges. It was the first time that anyone had found living larvae hitchhiking inside the body of an animal. The researchers studied six sets of godwit droppings and found living larvae in three of the sets. In total, they came up with 95 larvae that were still in one piece. Of these, 12 were alive. They hadn't been harmed at all by the digestive systems of the birds. Bugs, guts, and poop are gross on their own. Add them together, and you've got what may be the ickiest news story of the year. Researchers in Spain have found a species of insect larvae that pass through the guts of migrating birds and emerge in the birds' droppings, unharmed. The larvae were probably able to survive the trip because birds don't fully digest their food when they eat a lot. And, when the birds migrate, they tend to gorge themselves frequently. Bloodworms take advantage of this to travel much farther than they could ever get on their own. Poop, it seems, can take you places.E. Sohn

Insect Stowaways
Insect Stowaways








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™