Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Middle school science adventures
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Missing Moose
Odor-Chasing Penguins
Eyes on the Depths
Behavior
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Girls are cool for school
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Birds
Rheas
Chicken
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
The hottest soup in New York
Pencil Thin
Boosting Fuel Cells
Computers
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Earth from the inside out
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet your mysterious relative
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
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Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Environment
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Out in the Cold
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Words of the Distant Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Skates
Catfish
Pygmy Sharks
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The Color of Health
Making good, brown fat
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
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Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Invertebrates
Fleas
Wasps
Black Widow spiders
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St. Bernards
African Jackal
Sun Bear
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Black Hole Journey
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Stalking Plants by Scent
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Reptiles
Iguanas
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
World of Three Suns
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Dark Galaxy
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Shape Shifting
A Clean Getaway
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Reach for the Sky
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Watering the Air
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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A Tongue and a Half A Tongue and a Half - A Tongue and a Half

A Tongue and a Half

If there were a prize for animal rudeness, a small South American bat would surely be in the running. The creature doesn't just stick out its tongue. It shoots it way, way out. In fact, its tongue is longer than its body. At 1.5 times the animal's body l Read More



Making light of sleep

Maybe this has happened to you: In the middle of class, while you pretended to be paying attention to the teacher’s lecture, your eyelids started to droop. You began having second thoughts about staying up late on Facebook the night before. Don’t be too Read More

Hey batter, wake up!

Just as travelers often experience jet lag when they fly long distances, a new study shows professional baseball players don't always play well when they travel from one time zone to the next. Read More

The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence

Snowy states like Wyoming have long used wooden snow fences to stop blowing snow from covering highways. Wide drifts form behind the fences instead of on the roads. Read More

Feeding School for Meerkats

Your teachers help you to learn math, spelling, and lots of other things. When you're done with all that, you might want to study your teachers, too. Scientists are interested in what makes teachers teach, and they're looking for clues throughout the Read More

Raccoons

Raccoons are mammals in the genus Procyon of the Procyonidae family. Raccoons are unusual for their thumbs, which (though not opposable) enable them to open many closed containers and doors. Read More

Aquatic Animals

When you think of aquatic mammals, do you think of a whale or an otter? In truth, there are a number of mammals who rely on water for hunting and fishing, as well as those who spend their entire lives in the sea. Read More

African Zebra

Zebras (members of the horse family), are native to central and southern Africa. They are black with white stripes. These stripes are typically vertical on the head, neck, forequarters, and main body, with horizontal stripes at the rear. Read More

These gems make their own way

Tom Chatham’s desk is littered with gemstones. Rubies, sapphires, and emeralds are scattered like pieces of candy. Some of them are as big as golf balls. We’re sitting on the seventh floor of a building in downtown San Francisco, upstairs from the famous Read More

Sticky Silky Feet

Comic book superhero Spider-Man uses tiny hairs on his fingertips to climb up walls. But he could have had another secret weapon to help him stick. Scientists have now found that some spiders can also make silk in their feet, which may sometimes help the Read More

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

In English grammar, words that refer to people, places, or things are called nouns. They can be classified in many ways. One way to classify nouns is according to whether they can be counted or not. Many English mistakes are related to this point. Read More

Growing Healthier Tomato Plants

If you've ever tried to grow your own flowers or vegetables, you know that gardening is an art as much as it is a science. The science part just took a step forward, at least for tomatoes. Read More

Microbes at the Gas Pump

Scientists searching for an Earth-friendly alternative to gasoline are looking in some of the weirdest places—termite guts, cow stomachs, and rotting logs. These researchers are hunting for bacteria and fungi that can help turn plant waste into a liquid f Read More

The Taming of the Cat

There are black cats, spotted cats, fat cats, and scaredy cats. Now, scientists have found what may be one of the first pet cats ever. Read More

City Trees Beat Country Trees

There are city people, and there are country people. Now, the same may be true for trees. A common type of tree grows twice as well in New York City as it does in rural places around the state, researchers report. Read More

An Earthlike Planet

Astronomers don't know whether life exists on other planets. But if it does, it's most likely to be found on a planet that has liquid water. Water, after all, is essential to life on Earth. Read More

Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider By Danielle Wood

While most schools offer some amount of circle time and fingerpaint, they are not all the same. Here's how to sort through the preschool mumbo jumbo, and pick the right place for your child. Read More

What is groundwater

Groundwater is water that comes from the ground. Sounds easy, doesn't it? Amazingly, many people use groundwater but don't even know it. In fact, half of everyone in the United States drinks groundwater everyday! Groundwater is even used to irrigate Read More

Plants Travel Wind Highways

Gusts of wind can knock you over if they blow hard enough. If you were a plant, though, the wind could carry you or your spores for thousands of kilometers. Read More

Makeup Science

Looking your best may be as much a science as it is an art—especially in the makeup business. Take a look at the cosmetics and beauty products on display when you shop: hair gel, lipstick, nail polish, shimmer, lip gloss, mascara, eye shadow, face powder Read More

Stonehenge Settlement

Stonehenge has mystified visitors for thousands of years. Somehow, about 4,600 years ago, people managed to haul humongous stones across southern England to a site on the Salisbury Plain. Read More

Rottweilers

A Rottweiler is a medium large, robust and powerful dog breed, originating from Germany. The breed is black with clearly defined tan markings on the cheeks, muzzle, chest, legs, and eyebrows. Read More

Living in the Desert

When you're hot and thirsty, you're likely to drink a glass of cold water or head for a shady spot to cool down. What you surely don't do is shrink your liver to a fraction of its original size. But that's just what a type of gazelle does to beat the des Read More

Who's Knocking?

Is it, or isn't it? That's been the question on every bird-lover's lips since April, when scientists announced that the ivory-billed woodpecker is still alive (see "Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker"). For the past 60 years, many experts supposed that th Read More

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Cardinals

Cardinals

The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds living in North and South America. These are robust, seed-eating birds, with strong bills. They are typically associated with open woodlan... Read More

Llamas

Llamas

The Llama skull generally resembles that of Camelus, the relatively larger brain-cavity and orbits and less developed cranial ridges being due to its smaller size. The nasal bones are shorter and broa... Read More

Mussels

Mussels

The term mussel is used for several families of bivalve mollusks inhabiting lakes, rivers, and creeks, as well as intertidal areas along coastlines worldwide. ... Read More

Melting Snow on Mars

Melting Snow on Mars

The search for life on Mars often starts with a search for water. That's because life as we know it can't exist without the wet stuff. ... Read More

Iguanas

Iguanas

Iguanas tend to have tall, flat plates jutting from their back like spines, when adult. Several species of this genus are common as pets, especially the Green Iguana in the United States and Canada, w... Read More

Earthworms

Earthworms

Earthworm is the common name for the larger members of the Oligochaeta in the phylum Annelida. Folk names for earthworm include "dew-worm", "night crawler" and "angleworm"... Read More

In Search of the Perfect French Fry

In Search of the Perfect French Fry

The perfect French fry means different things to different people. You might like them McDonald's-style: straight, skinny, and golden brown. But you probably know people who like the spicy kind that t... Read More

Color-Changing Bugs

Color-Changing Bugs

A variety of animals can dramatically change the colors of their bodies to blend with the environment or to ward off predators, among other reasons. Such creatures, including chameleons and squid, us... Read More

Catching a Comet's Tail

Catching a Comet's Tail

It's been a bumpy ride for the spacecraft known as Stardust. On Jan. 2, the NASA craft got within 240 kilometers of the core of a comet known as Wild 2 (pronounced Vilt 2). The region around the comet... Read More

In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)

In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)

The tortures of Antarctica include not only cold, but also heat. I discovered it nearly every morning. As I woke in my tiny tent, in the middle of a million square miles of ice, I struggled to get my... Read More

Digging Dinos

Digging Dinos

Dinosaurs didn't just roam the Earth's surface during their reign on the planet tens of millions of years ago. New evidence suggests that some dinos also spent time underground. Paleontologists from ... Read More

Seagulls

Seagulls

Gulls are seabirds in the family Laridae. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae), and more distantly to the waders, auks and skimmers. Most gulls belong to the large genus Larus... Read More

Whale Watch

Whale Watch

It doesn't matter how seasick people may feel. When a whale appears, nothing else matters, says whale researcher Steve Palumbi. "Everyone—from 5 to 95 years old—rushes to the side of the boat.&qu... Read More

Staying Away from Sick Lobsters

Staying Away from Sick Lobsters

Lobsters may have a sick sense. New experiments show that certain kinds of lobsters avoid sick individuals even before the infected lobsters are contagious or show symptoms that people can see. It's ... Read More

Petrified Lightning

Petrified Lightning

Lightning has amazing powers. One bolt heats the air to 30,000 degrees C. That's five times as hot as the surface of the sun. Lightning can frighten pets and kids, start fires, destroy trees, and kill... Read More









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