Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Getting the dirt on carbon
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
How to Fly Like a Bat
How to Silence a Cricket
Jay Watch
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
Mosquito duets
The Electric Brain
Birds
Birds We Eat
Ducks
Peafowl
Chemistry and Materials
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Hair Detectives
A Framework for Growing Bone
Computers
Hubble trouble doubled
Music of the Future
Games with a Purpose
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
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Earth
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Unnatural Disasters
Getting the dirt on carbon
Environment
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Sahara Cemetery
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Lungfish
Swordfish
Angler Fish
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Eat Out, Eat Smart
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
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GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Taste Messenger
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
A Fix for Injured Knees
Invertebrates
Horseshoe Crabs
Corals
Flies
Mammals
Beagles
Aquatic Animals
Golden Retrievers
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Road Bumps
Dreams of Floating in Space
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Seeds of the Future
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Iguanas
Boa Constrictors
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
World of Three Suns
A Smashing Display
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Slip Sliming Away
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Reach for the Sky
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Arctic Melt
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A Butterfly's New Green Glow A Butterfly's New Green Glow - A Butterfly's New Green Glow

A Butterfly's New Green Glow

The colorful patterns on a butterfly's wings can be mysterious and beautiful. Add a jellyfish gene to a butterfly's genetic makeup, and the result might be even more awe-inspiring. The jellyfish gene directs production of a chemical compound that glows g Read More



Swifts

Swifts are the most aerial of birds and some, like the Common Swift, even sleep and mate on the wing. Larger species, such as white-throated needletail, are amongst the fastest flyers in animal kingdom. Read More

World of Three Suns

Astronomers have discovered a planet in the Milky Way galaxy that has three suns. It's weird enough trying to imagine three suns in the sky at once. Scientists are having a hard time explaining how such a planet could exist in the first place. Read More

Snow Traps

Erica David was 11 years old when she discovered the scientific wonders of snow. Now, when even the biggest blizzards strike her area, she'd rather be out measuring wind gusts than sipping cocoa by a fire. Read More

These gems make their own way

Tom Chatham’s desk is littered with gemstones. Rubies, sapphires, and emeralds are scattered like pieces of candy. Some of them are as big as golf balls. We’re sitting on the seventh floor of a building in downtown San Francisco, upstairs from the famous Read More

Copycat Monkeys

Imitation can be annoying—like when your little brother or sister repeats everything you say. It can also be fun—like during a game of follow-the-leader. Imitation is also an important way for babies to learn about interacting with adults. Scientists hav Read More

Pythons

Python is the common name for a group of non-venomous constricting snakes, specifically the family Pythonidae. Other sources consider this group a subfamily of the Boas (Pythoninae). Pythons are more related to boas than to any other snake-family. Read More

Birds We Eat

Birds have always been an important food source for man. In addition to domestic species that provide us with eggs, there are still other species that are hunted in the wild for sport and for food. Some are quite common, like chicken and turkey. Read More

Horses

Horses first evolved in the Americas , but went extinct there until reintroduced by Europeans. While isolated domestication may have occurred as early as 10,000 years ago, the first clear evidence dates to c. 5000 BC. Read More

Bandicoot

A bandicoot is any of about 20 species of small to medium-sized, terrestrial marsupial omnivores in the order Peramelemorphia. The word bandicoot is an anglicised form of the Telugu word pandhi-kokku. Read More

Miscellaneous Mammals

Mammals are identified by a combination of warm blood, body fur or hair, and glands that produce milk to feed their young; beyond these few common traits, however, mammals are wildly diverse in shape, size, habitat and behavior. Read More

Ready, Set, Supernova

Stars explode all the time in outer space, but astronomers usually see the explosions only after they've happened. One type of stellar explosion, called a supernova, can glow for days or even months. Read More

Armadillo

Armadillos are small placental mammals of the family Dasypodidae, mostly known for having a bony armor shell. All species are native to the Americas, where they inhabit a variety of environments. Read More

Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab

Robbery, vandalism, murder: Crimes happen every day. But people aren't the only victims of illegal activity. Bad guys can also target animals. And since animals can't tell police officers what they've seen, these are some of the toughest cases. Read More

Boa Constrictors

Boas are a type of snake that are members of the Boidae family. Boas are basal snakes that are "primitive" in evolutionary terms (i.e. less derived). They are constrictors and give birth to live young. Read More

Thinner Air, Less Splatter

If you could slow down time, you'd be amazed at the things you could see. In slow motion, for example, you could watch individual drops of rain landing in puddles and making mini-splats. Read More

Tiger Sharks

The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) is one of nature's largest sharks. The tiger shark hunts alone, usually at night. Its name is derived from the dark stripes down its body, which fade as the shark matures. Read More

Ferocious Growth Spurts

Big dinosaurs were big eaters, especially in their teenage years. During adolescence, Tyrannosaurus rex and its relatives sometimes doubled their weight in just 4 years, according to new studies. Read More

Pygmy Sharks

The pygmy shark (Euprotomicrus bispinatus), the smallest of all the shark species, is a sleeper shark of the Dalatiinae subfamily. It is found in subtropical and warm temperate oceans worldwide, from the surface to depths of 1,800 metres. Read More

Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth

On a hot, clear day, an umbrella can provide cooling relief from the sun's scorching rays. The same concept might one day help protect Earth from the accumulating heat of global warming. Read More

The Birds are Falling

It's time to start paying close attention to birds. That's what a group of scientists and students from Stanford University in California says. Read More

Arachnids

Arachnids are invertebrate (spineless) animals that have an exoskeleton, a body divided into two parts, and eight jointed legs (whereas insects have only six.) Also unlike insects, arachnids have no antennae or wings. Read More

Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins

New evidence from satellites and weather stations suggests that way down south, Antarctica is feeling the heat. And that’s not good news for penguins. Scientists studying climate change knew some coastal areas of Antarctica were warming. Read More

Saving Africa's Wild Dogs

For Gregory Rasmussen, a typical workday starts just before sunrise. The wildlife conservation biologist studies African painted dogs in Zimbabwe, and that's when these endangered animals usually wake up. Read More

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Sun Screen

Sun Screen

When summer comes, I get sun crazy. I like to eat on the patio and lie on the beach. I walk and bike everywhere. I even bring my work outside. Soaking up the sun feels so good—as long as I'm wearing s... Read More

Early Maya Writing

Early Maya Writing

More than 2,000 years ago, a Maya scribe painted a pattern of thick black lines on a pyramid wall. Over centuries, these hieroglyphs disappeared from view as people took apart the wall and built bigge... Read More

Big Squid

Big Squid

Fishermen in Florida recently discovered the remains of a humongous squid unlike any creature ever seen in the Atlantic Ocean. The creature's Jell-O-like body wasn't completely intact, but the living ... Read More

Whales

Whales

Gentle giants of the open oceans, whales are among the earth's oldest and largest creatures. Living in a watery world so far removed from our own, our understanding of whales is still advancing, and m... Read More

Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery

Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery

Hidden inside every shiny green emerald is a geographical mystery. Once an emerald is plucked from a mine in its home country and turned into a piece of jewelry, it can be nearly impossible to figure... Read More

Crustaceans

Crustaceans

Picture your last seafood meal, and you're probably seeing a crustacean. Crustaceans are mostly water-dwelling invertebrates (no spine), characterized by a jointed body and limbs, and a hard outer she... Read More

Internet Generation

Internet Generation

I sent my first e-mail message when I was 17. I discovered Google 5 years later. Today, I use the Internet all the time. But when I was a kid, I never imagined that I would one day send messages usin... Read More

Asian Elephants

Asian Elephants

The Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), is one of the three living species of elephant, and the only living species of the genus Elephas. The species is found primarily in large parts of India, Sri Lank... Read More

Flush-Free Fertilizer

Flush-Free Fertilizer

Most urine ends up in the toilet, as it should. But the garden may be another appropriate place to send human pee, according to scientists in Finland. The yellow liquid appears to help cabbages grow. ... Read More

Numbats

Numbats

The numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) is a small marsupial native to western and southern Australia with a number of unique features. The ecologically vulnerable numbat is the sole member of the genus My... Read More

Weird, new ant

Weird, new ant

In the Amazon rainforests of Brazil, scientists have discovered a peculiar new species of ant. The insect has no eyes. Its body is pale. And its fanglike mouthparts are longer than the rest of its hea... Read More

Walking Sticks

Walking Sticks

Phasmids (or Walking Sticks as they are commonly called) are one of the most remarkable orders of insects. They are typically either stick-like or leaf-like; camouflage or mimicry being their defining... Read More

Manatees

Manatees

Manatees inhabit the shallow, marshy coastal areas of North, Central, and South America, and the Caribbean Sea. They spend half of their day sleeping in the water, surfacing for air every 20 minutes.... Read More

Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life

Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life

You've heard it before: If you know what's good for you, you'll go to bed on time. Now, scientists are saying something more about going to sleep. And you may lose more than just TV privileges if you ... Read More

Lives of a Mole Rat

Lives of a Mole Rat

Some animals are easy to love. Mole rats don't fit into this category. With their huge teeth, squinty eyes, piglike noses, and, in some cases, wrinkled, nearly hairless bodies, mole rats aren't exact... Read More









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