Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Cannibal Crickets
Insect Stowaways
Roach Love Songs
Behavior
Fear Matters
Brain cells take a break
Eating Troubles
Birds
Backyard Birds
Kookaburras
Waterfowl
Chemistry and Materials
Boosting Fuel Cells
Hair Detectives
The memory of a material
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Battling Mastodons
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Riding to Earth's Core
Life under Ice
Environment
The Oily Gulf
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
Nurse Sharks
Sturgeons
Freshwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
A Taste for Cheese
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Spiders
Fleas
Hermit Crabs
Mammals
Cheetah
Miscellaneous Mammals
Minks
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Road Bumps
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Chameleons
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Cousin Earth
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
A Clean Getaway
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Revving Up Green Machines
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Earth's Poles in Peril
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Groundwater and the  Water Cycle

Groundwater and the Water Cycle By http://www.groundwater.org/kc/gwwatercycle.html

Now that you have learned about the exciting world of groundwater, it is time to see how it fits into that endless watery process called the water cycle, also known as thehydrologic cycle. Read More



One ring around them all

Astronomers recently found another ring around the planet Saturn ó and itís the biggest one yet. This newly discovered ring stretches about 15 million miles across, which makes a loop big enough to fit a billion Earths inside. Read More

Sun Bear

The Sun bear (Ursus malayanus) is a bear found primarily in the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia. The Sun bear stands approximately four feet (1.2 m) in length, making it the smallest member in the bear family. Read More

10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test

Taking the GSAT math test is never an easy venture because math can be a difficult and complex subject. But most students do poorly on the GSAT math tests not so much because the material is too difficult to understand as much as the student's study habit Read More

Quokkas

The Quokka (Setonix brachyurus) is a small macropod, about the size of a large domestic cat. Like other marsupials in the macropod family (such as the kangaroos and wallabies), the Quokka is herbivorous and mainly nocturnal. Read More

Springing forward

It's not just Daylight Savings Time that came early this year. All around the world, spring seems to be coming sooner than it used to. It hasn't moved up on the calendar ó but many cycles in nature are telling us that spring just can't wait to be sprung. Read More

Preparing for the GSAT Exam

To do well on the GSAT exam you must first learn the material, and then review it before the test. These are techniques to better understand your material: Learning 1. Take good notes in your class lectures and textbooks. Read More

Whoever vs. Whomever

To determine whether to use whoever or whomever, here is the rule: him + he = whoever him + him = whomever Read More

The algae invasion

Algae: You know it when you see it. Itís the slimy green carpet that blankets the top of ponds or neglected swimming pools. It may be long strands of seaweed, sometimes used for fertilizer or food, that sway with the ocean tide. Read More

Mercury's magnetic twisters

If you look at pictures of Mercury taken with a high-powered telescope, the planet looks peaceful and calm. Itís tiny, barely bigger than our moon, and covered by craters. Read More

Revving Up Green Machines

People love their "zoom, zoom." In the United States alone, 17 million new cars hit the road in 2004. But the freedom to travel anywhere, anytime in a car or truck comes at a price. And it's not just the cost of gasoline, insurance, and repairs. Automobi Read More

Feathered Fossils

As dinosaurs go, Velociraptor mongoliensis is fairly famous. Three starred in the 1993 film Jurassic Park. Despite the creature's fame, scientists have found remains from only about 20 velociraptors. Most of those discoveries turned up in the last 15 yea Read More

Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs spent 170 million years on Earth before they suddenly died out about 65 million years ago. After dinosaurs disappeared, mammals took over. It turns out that small mammals lived during the reign of dinosaurs, too. And over the last few years, a Read More

Gazelle

A gazelle is an antelope of the genus Gazella. Gazelles are known as swift animals; they are able to reach high speeds for long periods of time. Gazelles are mostly found in the grasslands and savannas of Africa, but they are also found Asia (SW). Read More

Plastic Meals for Seals

What happens after you dump your soda bottles, milk jugs, and yogurt containers into the ocean? Bite-size pieces of the discarded plastic can end up in the stomachs of seals and other animals in distant places. Read More

The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot

In at least one place, the land at the bottom of the ocean is nearly naked, scientists have discovered. The rocks that form Earth's surface beneath the oceans are usually covered with a thick layer made up of sand or dirt and the skeletons of tiny ocean c Read More

Flush-Free Fertilizer

Most urine ends up in the toilet, as it should. But the garden may be another appropriate place to send human pee, according to scientists in Finland. The yellow liquid appears to help cabbages grow. Researchers from the University of Kuopio grew... Read More

Between a rock and a wet place

Life is anything but a vacation for a climbing goby, a small fish that lives in Hawaii. Usually shorter than your thumb, this fish hatches in freshwater high in the hills and mountains. But soon afterward itís swept out to the salty sea by strong currents Read More

A Family in Space

In a distant region of our solar system, scientists have found a group of related objects that have similar surfaces and orbits. It's the first "family" of objects ever discovered in the Kuiper belt, which is a vast ring of rocky and icy bodies. Read More

Worms

Worms are among the most common of a all invertebrates! Despite their sometimes slimy nature, worms are a vital part of our ecology. Read More

Llamas

The Llama skull generally resembles that of Camelus, the relatively larger brain-cavity and orbits and less developed cranial ridges being due to its smaller size. The nasal bones are shorter and broader, and are joined by the premaxilla. Read More

Bandicoot

A bandicoot is any of about 20 species of small to medium-sized, terrestrial marsupial omnivores in the order Peramelemorphia. The word bandicoot is an anglicised form of the Telugu word pandhi-kokku. Read More

Boosting Fuel Cells

Some people are happy to learn simply for the sake of learning. Megan Burger would rather use her education to create cutting-edge inventions with important uses. That's exactly what the 18-year-old has done. At this year's Intel International Science an Read More

Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around

The tiny bugs that can cause disease often have ingenious ways of spreading themselves around. Now, scientists have figured out how one particular parasite does itóby forcing its host sand fly to spit up. Read More

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Falcons

Falcons

A Falcon is any of several species of bird of the genus Falco, such as the Peregrine Falcon which are raptors or birds of prey. These birds have thin, pointed wings, which allow them to dive at extrem... Read More

Listen and Learn

Listen and Learn

f you want to learn anything at school, you need to listen to your teachers. Unfortunately, millions of kids can't hear what their teachers are saying. And it's not because these students are goofing ... Read More

Message in a dinosaur's teeth

Message in a dinosaur's teeth

Spinosaurs were large, meat-eating dinosaurs whose fossilized remains are often found in the same areas as the bones of tyrannosaurs (such as Tyrannosaurus rex). Fans of the movie Jurassic Park III ma... Read More

Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison

Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison

Five years ago, marine biologist Raphael Ritson-Williams was collecting flatworms in the waters around the Pacific island of Guam, when he found a new species. He put the oval, filmy, yellow flatworm ... Read More

The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs

The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs

A new twist in an old story about dinosaur bones sounds like a fairy tale for fossil fans: Once upon a time, scientists discovered three different dinosaur skulls in the northern United States. The fi... Read More

Drilling Deep for Fuel

Drilling Deep for Fuel

Digging in dirt and rock is a big business. Oil and gas lie beneath Earth's surface in certain places, and these reservoirs are the planet's main sources of fuel. Until now, all the digging has happe... Read More

Return of the Lost Limbs

Return of the Lost Limbs

When people lose legs after accidents or illnesses, emergency care and artificial limbs often allow them to walk again. But salamanders and newts in the same situation don't need doctors or artificial... Read More

Dino Takeout for Mammals

Dino Takeout for Mammals

Dinosaurs were big. Mammals, on the other hand, were puny when the dinosaurs were around. Right? New discoveries in China are challenging the idea that dinos ruled the land before they became extinct... Read More

Hoofed Mammals

Hoofed Mammals

Not all mammals walk on paws. Hooves have evolved as a modified toenail for many herbivorous (plant-eating) animals, both common and exotic, providing special protection on rocky, mountainous, or unev... Read More

Algae Motors

Algae Motors

Dogs fetch. Pigeons deliver messages. Yaks and oxen haul heavy loads. Now, scientists at Harvard University have found that even tiny algae can be used to do work.... Read More

Cougars

Cougars

The Puma, also known as the Cougar or Mountain Lion, is a large, solitary cat found in the Americas. There is a considerable variation in color and size of these animals across their large range of ha... Read More

Hitting the redo button on evolution

Hitting the redo button on evolution

People have always wondered why plants and animals are built the way they are. Charles Darwin, an Englishman who lived in the 1800s, was very curious about the shape of life forms, and did lots of exp... Read More

Figuring Out What Makes Dogs Tick

Figuring Out What Makes Dogs Tick

You may know a lot about your dog: what she likes to eat, where she likes to walk, how she likes to be petted. But do you know anything about the genes that make her that way? For the first time, a t... Read More

Petrified Lightning

Petrified Lightning

Lightning has amazing powers. One bolt heats the air to 30,000 degrees C. That's five times as hot as the surface of the sun. Lightning can frighten pets and kids, start fires, destroy trees, and kill... Read More

Crawfish

Crawfish

Crayfish, sometimes called crawfish, or crawdads are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. They are found in bodies of fresh water that do not freeze to ... Read More









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