Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Fast-flying fungal spores
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Toads
Animals
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Deep Krill
Behavior
Listen and Learn
The Science Fair Circuit
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Birds
Quails
Woodpecker
Albatrosses
Chemistry and Materials
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Popping to Perfection
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Middle school science adventures
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Feathered Fossils
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Watering the Air
Flower family knows its roots
Surf Watch
Environment
The Birds are Falling
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Pollution Detective
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Untangling Human Origins
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Fish
Flounder
Marlin
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
The Essence of Celery
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Prime Time for Cicadas
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Spit Power
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Invertebrates
Butterflies
Insects
Moths
Mammals
Gerbils
Rabbits
Cats
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Einstein's Skateboard
Speedy stars
Plants
Seeds of the Future
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Sea Turtles
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Planning for Mars
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Reach for the Sky
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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An Ancient Spider's Web An Ancient Spider's Web - An Ancient Spider's Web

An Ancient Spider's Web

A spider's silk web is strong enough to snare insects, but usually too delicate to withstand harsh weather and the ravages of time. So, even though spiders have lived on Earth for millions of years, few of their webs have lasted that long. Now, scientist Read More



Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants

What could be worse than toxic sludge seeping into soil, poisoning animals and people? The headache of cleaning up all that muck. For years, engineers have struggled to get oil and tar out of the ground at hazardous-waste sites around the U. S. Read More

Copybees

Baby brothers and sisters aren't the only copycats in town. Bumblebees imitate each other, too. In one study, researchers at Queen Mary University of London put a "demonstrator" bee on a fake flower of a particular color while other bees watched. Afterwa Read More

From Chimps to People

It can be fascinating to watch chimpanzees at the zoo. Chimps are the closest, living animal relatives to people. Watching them can be like watching ourselves. Read More

Graphene's superstrength

Big technology comes in tiny packages. New cell phones, music players and personal computers get smaller every year, which means these electronics require even smaller components on the inside. Engineers are looking for creative ways to build these compon Read More

Chipmunks

Though chipmunks are commonly depicted with their paws up to the mouth, eating peanuts, or more famously their cheeks bulging out on either side, chipmunks eat a much more diverse range of foods than just nuts. Read More

Lampreys

A lamprey is a jawless fish with a toothed, funnel-like sucking mouth, with which most species bore into fish flesh to suck their blood. In zoology, lampreys are not considered to be true fish because of their different morphology and physiology. Read More

The Oily Gulf

On the night of April 20, an explosion rocked the Deepwater Horizon. The Deepwater Horizon was a huge building or platform in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico used to drill oil from deep below the ocean floor. Read More

If Only Bones Could Speak

Language is one trait that separates people from other animals. Words give us the power to communicate complicated ideas, and this skill has taken us far. Read More

How to Fly Like a Bat

It takes weeks, treats, and a lot of patience to train a bat to fly inside a wind tunnel. Bats already know how to fly, of course. The problem is to get them to do it inside a small tunnel with the wind rushing at them. So scientists at Brown University Read More

Math of the World

If you know where to look, you can find math anywhere you go. Math is not just in the numbers on a cash register or at a football game. Read More

Hungry bug seeks hot meal

Superman may have something in common with one kind of seed-eating bug. Both use special powers to zero in on a warm target. In the bug’s case, the target is dinner. For humans, finding some Oreos or popcorn can be a challenge in a crowded supermarket. N Read More

Sugar-pill medicine

Feeling sick? You wouldn’t want to take fake medicine for an earache or major illness. But in some cases, the fake stuff can help. Studies have long shown that fake medicines, or placebos, can produce the same healing effect as an active drug. This pheno Read More

Germ Zapper

You've probably experienced the power of antibiotics. These amazing medicines kill the bacteria that give you strep throat and other infections. Usually, you start feeling better after a day or two of treatment. Read More

Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories

Medicine comes in lots of different packages. Painkillers in a tablet can make your headache go away. Antibiotic cream from a tube can prevent your cuts from becoming infected. But can medicine come packaged in chicken eggs? A team of scientists from Sco Read More

Poor Devils

The real Tasmanian devil doesn't look much like the familiar snarling and whirling cartoon character known as Taz, but it's every bit as fierce. When European settlers arrived on the Australian island of Tasmania and met the small marsupial, they called Read More

Tortoises

A tortoise is a land-dwelling reptile of the order Testudines.Just the Facts: Like its aquatic cousins, the turtle and the terrapin, the tortoise is shielded from predators by a shell. Most land tortoises are herbivorous in the wild. Read More

Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays

Every day, boats full of tourists arrive at Shark Ray Alley, where tour guides feed chunks of fish guts to the animals. Read More

A Spider's Silky Strength

Legend has it that a Chinese princess discovered silk while drinking tea under a mulberry tree. A silkworm cocoon fell into her cup, and when she grabbed the bundle, it unwound into a single strand of silk. For thousands of years, the Chinese kept the pro Read More

Helping the Cause of Macaws

Deep in the steamy Peruvian jungle, a macaw spreads her brilliant scarlet feathers over her three squirming chicks. She pokes her great beak out the door of the wooden box where she has made her nest and waits for her mate to return with food. Fifty feet Read More

Wrong-way planets do gymnastics

Cartwheels aren’t just for gymnasts anymore — a gang of distant, unusual planets, a team of astronomers say, may have done giant, deep-space cartwheels to get into place. Read More

Dreaming makes perfect

Dreams can be familiar and strange, fantastical or boring. No one knows for certain why people dream, but some dreams might be connected to the mental processes that help us learn. Read More

Walks on the Wild Side

There are people who love zoos, and there are people who hate them. Apparently, the same goes for animals. After a 3-year review of studies of animal behavior at 40 zoos, two researchers from England have concluded that animals needing lots of space in t Read More

Sweet, Sticky Science

Real maple syrup sweetens even the dullest breakfast, and it's no mystery why. The sticky stuff you pour on your pancakes is at least two-thirds sugar. Read More

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Woolly Mammoths

Woolly Mammoths

A mammoth is any of a number of an extinct genus of elephant, often with long curved tusks and, in northern species, a covering of long hair. They lived during the Pleistocene epoch from 1.6 million y... Read More

Newly named fish crawls and hops

Newly named fish crawls and hops

n January 2008, divers swimming off an Indonesian island saw an unusual fish. To try to identify the strange-looking swimmer, they took pictures and sent them to fish expert Ted Pietsch of the Univers... Read More

Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins

Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins

New evidence from satellites and weather stations suggests that way down south, Antarctica is feeling the heat. And that’s not good news for penguins. Scientists studying climate change knew some coas... Read More

Internet Generation

Internet Generation

I sent my first e-mail message when I was 17. I discovered Google 5 years later. Today, I use the Internet all the time. But when I was a kid, I never imagined that I would one day send messages usin... Read More

The bug that may have killed a dinosaur

The bug that may have killed a dinosaur

Sue is a famous Tyrannosaurus rex whose skeleton lives in the Field Museum in Chicago. Small, smooth holes in Sue’s jawbones have been a scientific mystery for years, and scientists want to know how t... Read More

Primate Memory Showdown

Primate Memory Showdown

In a memory-based competition between you and a chimp, who do you think would win? If you put yourself on top, you might want to guess again. In a task that challenged test takers to remember numbers... Read More

Flies

Flies

As defined by entomologists (scientists who study insects), a fly is any species of insect of the order Diptera. These typically have one pair of true wings, with a set of modified hind wings. ... Read More

Birds We Eat

Birds We Eat

Birds have always been an important food source for man. In addition to domestic species that provide us with eggs, there are still other species that are hunted in the wild for sport and for food. So... Read More

Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone

Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone

The last dinosaurs on Earth died some 65 million years ago, but they left bits of themselves behind everywhere they lived. Around the world, dug-up bones have given scientists lots of clues about what... Read More

Walrus

Walrus

Walruses are members of the order Carnivora and suborder (or alternatively superfamily) Pinnipedia. They are the only members in the family Odobenidae. ... Read More

A Family in Space

A Family in Space

In a distant region of our solar system, scientists have found a group of related objects that have similar surfaces and orbits. It's the first "family" of objects ever discovered in the Kui... Read More

Chocolate Rules

Chocolate Rules

For a lot of people, there's no better taste combo than chocolate and nuts. For food scientists, though, this combination is a major headache. ... Read More

 A Fallout Feast for Crabs

A Fallout Feast for Crabs

Many people dream of living by the sea. There, they could relax or nod off to the soothing sounds of waves sweeping into shore. Some crabs endure tougher surroundings. In shallow waters off the coast ... Read More

Camel Spiders

Camel Spiders

Camel Spiders are also called wind scorpions and sun spiders. Most live in tropical or semitropical regions where they inhabit warm and arid habitats, but some species have been known to live in grass... Read More

How to Silence a Cricket

How to Silence a Cricket

Among the things that come to mind when thinking about night are darkness, the moon, bedtime, and, in many places, chirping crickets. The list may soon get shorter in the lowlands on the Hawaiian isla... Read More









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