Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Silk’s superpowers
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Newts
Animals
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Walks on the Wild Side
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Making Sense of Scents
Supersonic Splash
Birds
Hawks
Penguins
Seagulls
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
Makeup Science
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Computers
Middle school science adventures
Games with a Purpose
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Downsized Dinosaurs
Feathered Fossils
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Environment
Shrinking Fish
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Saving Wetlands
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
A Big Discovery about Little People
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Hammerhead Sharks
Salmon
Carp
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Healing Honey
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Attacking Asthma
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Ants
Wasps
Mammals
African Mammals
Elephants
Koalas
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Speedy stars
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Farms sprout in cities
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Pythons
Crocodiles
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Catching a Comet's Tail
Cousin Earth
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Algae Motors
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Welcome to the articles page!

AlbatrossesAlbatrosses - Albatrosses

Albatrosses

Albatrosses, of the biological family Diomedeidae, are large seabirds allied to the procellariids, storm-petrels and diving-petrels in the order Procellariiformes (the tubenoses). They range widely in the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific. Read More



Copybees

Baby brothers and sisters aren't the only copycats in town. Bumblebees imitate each other, too. In one study, researchers at Queen Mary University of London put a "demonstrator" bee on a fake flower of a particular color while other bees watched. Afterwa Read More

Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth

As the star of Jurassic Park III, the spinosaurus dominated the screen, displaying a huge sail on its back and baring distinctive teeth. Millions of years ago, this large, meat-eating dinosaur may have hunted fish. Its long snout and narrow jaws resemble Read More

What the appendix is good for

It was a Saturday morning in 1991 when 12-year old Heather Smith woke up feeling nauseous. Spring break was just beginning, and her parents were planning to take her skiing the next day in Flagstaff, Ariz. — two hours from their home in Tempe. Read More

Little People Cause Big Surprise

There are little people, and then there are little people. Between 38,000 and 18,000 years ago, there lived an especially tiny group of people-like beings. Read More

Deep Krill

A little over a year ago, scientists lowered a camera to the bottom of the Southern Ocean off the coast of Antarctica. The video images from that camera surprised them. Three thousand meters (9,800 feet) below the surface of the sea, the researchers obse Read More

Assembling the Tree of Life

It's easy to see how you're related to your parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters, and cousins. It's not so easy to see how you're related to apple trees, worms, or elephants. Read More

Got Milk? How?

We put it in cereal. We drink it with cookies. And we eat tons of foods that are made from it, including yogurt, cheese and even some crackers, breads and granola bars. For most of us, milk is a staple that would be hard to live without. Thousands of yea Read More

Giant Panda

The Giant panda is a mammal classified in the bear family, Ursidae, native to central and southern China. The Giant panda has a very distinctive black-and-white coat, and adults measure around 1.5m long and around 75cm tall at the shoulder. Read More

The memory of a material

Nafion is a useful material that has been around since the 1960s, but don’t be surprised if you’ve never heard of it. It was first made by a chemist at DuPont, a company that makes chemicals, and it is a common ingredient in fuel cells. (Fuel cells, which Read More

A New Touch

Many people who have artificial arms or legs find these devices clumsy and difficult to operate. What's missing is the ability to think about making a movement, then having that movement happen. Read More

Charged cars that would charge

In the middle of February, Tom Gage drove his car right into a building in downtown San Diego. Gage didn’t crash his car; he was showing it off — to a crowd gathered at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Read More

Kodiak Bear

The Kodiak bear (U. arctos middendorffi) is the largest bear in the world and the largest land carnivore. They are a North American subspecies of the Brown Bear, along with the Grizzly and Mexican Brown Bear. Read More

Lightening Your Mood

Everyone gets the blues sometimes, but some people can feel so down that they need medical attention. More than just sadness, such serious depression is an illness that can make people feel hopeless and unable to get out of bed. Doctors often treat depres Read More

Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes

Cookies, soda, candy, chocolate: It can be hard to resist the temptation of sugary-sweet treats and drinks. But sugar is high in calories, and eating too much of it can cause weight gain and other health problems. That's why millions of people drink diet Read More

A Satellite of Your Own

A rocket soars into space. It releases a satellite, which goes into orbit around Earth. The satellite begins collecting data and sending signals. Read More

Digging for Ancient DNA

In the movie Jurassic Park, scientists discover fossilized insects that had eaten dinosaur blood just before they died. The dino blood is full of DNA—the instruction manual of life—and the scientists use some of those tiny molecules to bring dinosaurs bac Read More

Grasshoppers

Grasshoppers, crickets and katydids are in order Orthoptera. Their size ranges from 5mm to 100mm. Most of them have highly developed hind legs, much stronger and larger than the other four legs, used for jumping. Read More

Dancing with Robots

Sprague's Sprockets, a team of two boys and two girls, waited nervously for its turn at the search-and-rescue station as the RoboCup Junior competition got under way. Read More

Chihuahuas

The Chihuahua is the smallest breed of dog and is named for the Chihuahua region in Mexico. Chihuahuas are best known for their small size and large, erect ears. Read More

Salt and Early Civilization

Before salted fries came out of drive-through windows, before salty pretzels sat on the shelves of every grocery store, before there was a saltshaker on every dinner table, people had to go to a lot of trouble to get salt. Read More

The Disappearing Newspaper

What's black and white and read all over? Not newspapers, at least not anymore. In fact, if you're like most young people, you probably don't read the newspaper at all. In one recent survey, just 19 percent of 18-to-34-year-olds said they read a newspape Read More

Math is a real brain bender

Don’t feel bad if it took forever to wrap your brain around math. Mastering arithmetic requires major reorganization in the way the brain works. As kids grow up, the parts of the brain used to do math problems change. In elementary school kids, a region Read More

Graphene's superstrength

Big technology comes in tiny packages. New cell phones, music players and personal computers get smaller every year, which means these electronics require even smaller components on the inside. Engineers are looking for creative ways to build these compon Read More

Featured Ads



Attacking Asthma

Attacking Asthma

One minute, you're breathing normally. The next minute, you're coughing, wheezing, and gasping for air. Maybe the trouble started when you stroked a cat. Or maybe it happened when you raced for a socc... Read More

Falcons

Falcons

A Falcon is any of several species of bird of the genus Falco, such as the Peregrine Falcon which are raptors or birds of prey. These birds have thin, pointed wings, which allow them to dive at extrem... Read More

Ancient Cave Behavior

Ancient Cave Behavior

People have been acting like people—in other words, they've been making tools, creating rituals, and sharing food—for a long time. That's the conclusion of a recent study from South Africa's southern ... Read More

Galaxies far, far, far away

Galaxies far, far, far away

How old are the objects you can see in the sky? The brightest star in the night sky, Sirius, is believed to be about 200-300 million years old. The Sun and Moon are much older—about 4.5 billion years ... Read More

Decoding a Beverage Jar

Decoding a Beverage Jar

It's a good thing that people in one ancient Chinese town didn't always thoroughly rinse out their beverage jars. Now, the leftover liquid that soaked into the pottery more than 8,000 years ago is pro... Read More

Microbes at the Gas Pump

Microbes at the Gas Pump

Scientists searching for an Earth-friendly alternative to gasoline are looking in some of the weirdest places—termite guts, cow stomachs, and rotting logs. These researchers are hunting for bacteria a... Read More

New Monkey Business

New Monkey Business

A new kind of monkey is giving scientists a lot to think about. Two groups of researchers independently discovered the rare creature in different forests in Tanzania last year (see "New Mammals&... Read More

The Pressure of Scuba Diving

The Pressure of Scuba Diving

At 25 feet below the surface of the water, Alex Whitaker's tooth started to ache. When he tried to dive deeper, the pain grew worse. ... Read More

Giving Sharks Safe Homes

Giving Sharks Safe Homes

Being surrounded by sharks may sound like a bad thing, but scientists say sharks are actually a good sign of ocean health. Even knowing that, Enric Sala, a marine ecologist and National Geographic Fel... Read More

Armadillo

Armadillo

Armadillos are small placental mammals of the family Dasypodidae, mostly known for having a bony armor shell. All species are native to the Americas, where they inhabit a variety of environments. ... Read More

Shrimpy Invaders

Shrimpy Invaders

A new type of shrimplike crustacean has appeared in the Great Lakes, and that's not necessarily a good thing. These crustaceans, called mysid shrimp, normally live in rivers near the western coast of... Read More

Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater

Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater

Mermaids probably don't exist. But there are children of certain tribes in Asia who are distinctly fishlike. ... Read More

A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps

A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps

Most parents would never consider putting a baby in a crib full of bees. Some wasp moms, however, do just that. It may sound like child abuse to you. Strangely enough, for the wasps known as beewolves... Read More

Who's Knocking?

Who's Knocking?

Is it, or isn't it? That's been the question on every bird-lover's lips since April, when scientists announced that the ivory-billed woodpecker is still alive (see "Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpe... Read More

Rheas

Rheas

The Rhea, also known as ñandú in Spanish, or ema in Portuguese, is a large flightless bird native to South America. The name was given in 1752 by Paul Mohring; his reason for choosing this name, from ... Read More









Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™