Agriculture
Springing forward
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Toads
Newts
Animals
Cannibal Crickets
Baboons Listen for Who's Tops
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Behavior
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Video Game Violence
Sugar-pill medicine
Birds
Pelicans
Robins
Seagulls
Chemistry and Materials
A Light Delay
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Computers
Supersonic Splash
Look into My Eyes
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Feathered Fossils
Fossil Forests
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Spotty Survival
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Tilapia
Lungfish
Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Building a Food Pyramid
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Problems with Prepositions
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
It's a Math World for Animals
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Foul Play?
Invertebrates
Tarantula
Shrimps
Giant Clam
Mammals
Guinea Pigs
Ferrets
Sperm Whale
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Fungus Hunt
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Iguanas
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
A Clean Getaway
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Reach for the Sky
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Welcome to the articles page!

Killer WhalesKiller Whales - Killer Whales

Killer Whales

The Orca (Orcinus orca) is the largest member of the oceanic dolphin family Delphinidae. They are sometimes referred to as blackfish, a group including Pilot whales, Pigmy and False killer whales and Melon headed whales. Read More



The Taming of the Cat

There are black cats, spotted cats, fat cats, and scaredy cats. Now, scientists have found what may be one of the first pet cats ever. Read More

Hair Detectives

You can tell a lot about people by looking at their hair—and not just whether they brush, spray, or blow-dry. Scientists have found a way to use hair to figure out where a person is from and where that person has been. The finding could help solve crimes Read More

Math is a real brain bender

Don’t feel bad if it took forever to wrap your brain around math. Mastering arithmetic requires major reorganization in the way the brain works. As kids grow up, the parts of the brain used to do math problems change. In elementary school kids, a region Read More

Watering the Air

The average temperature around the world is rising. People living in the U.S. Midwest might find this fact hard to believe, though. Two new studies show that in America’s heartland, summers are now cooler and wetter than they were in years past. The scien Read More

Storks

Storks are large, long-legged, long-necked wading birds with long stout bills, belonging to the family Ciconiidae. They occur in most of the warmer regions of the world and tend to live in drier habitats than the related herons, spoonbills and ibises Read More

Challenging the Forces of Nature

A tsunami is approaching the beach. Time is running out. In just 20 minutes, it'll be all over. "We should start focusing on how to prevent the tsunami," says 14-year-old Anudeep Gosal of Orlando, Fla. His teammates, all 12-to-14-year-olds, are drawing o Read More

Swans

Swans are large water birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae. Adult swan diets are almost entirely vegetarian. Read More

Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker

An amazing sighting has thrilled birdwatchers, scientists, and environmentalists around the world: The ivory-billed woodpecker is alive. Long feared extinct, the legendary bird has recently been spotted by several people in the cypress and tupelo swamps o Read More

Fishy Sounds

Although coral reefs look peaceful, they're noisy places. Shrimp make popping noises that sound like bacon frying in a pan. Fish click their jaws or make rumbling sounds as they swim around. Such a loud, continuous racket may sound strange to snorkelers, Read More

Earth's Poles in Peril

The North and South poles are remote and frigid places that receive lots of animal visitors but few human tourists. But even if you never plan to visit the polar bears in the north or penguins in the south, now is a perfect time to start thinking about th Read More

Childhood's Long History

You're lucky. Compared to other animals, you get to be a kid for a long time before you have to strike off on your own. Recent studies suggest that people have been enjoying long childhoods for many thousands of years. Read More

Krill

Krill are small, shrimp-like ocean crustaceans. These pink, translucent animals congregate in large, dense masses called "swarms" or "clouds," that turn areas of the ocean's surface pink. Read More

Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head

Any time you go outside, you get pummeled by invisible storms of dust. Even on a perfectly sunny day, you inhale pieces of dead bugs. Floating specks of hair and pollen settle on your skin. Tiny chunks of comets might even fall on your head from outer spa Read More

Eating Troubles

We all have to eat, but choosing the right foods can be hard. Many people also have trouble controlling how much they eat. Instead of eating reasonable portions of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and other healthy foods, lots of people eat too many cook Read More

Screaming for Ice Cream

Summer, where I'm from, is a wonderful thing. When the weather warms up, people head outdoors. Days are long and hot—perfect conditions for canoeing, biking, and having picnics by the lake. Best of all, a sweaty brow is a great excuse to gather your frien Read More

Sugary Survival Skill

Dehydration dooms most animals. Humans, for example, die if their bodies lose about 12 percent of their water. But some tough little critters can get through long periods of drought. One bug survives dry times by entering a dehydrated state. Now, scientis Read More

The Other Side of the Zoo Fence

Architects often have to deal with difficult clients, but Lee Ehmke's customers are especially hard to work for. They sleep through meetings. They never pay. They don't even use bathrooms when they have to go. Read More

A Fix for Injured Knees

Being a professional athlete must be a lot of fun. But it's also risky. Just ask New England Patriots receiver Chad Jackson. He recently injured his knee during a game against the Superbowl-winning Indianapolis Colts. Read More

Jellyfish

Jellyfish are marine invertebrates belonging to the Scyphozoan class, and in turn the phylum Cnidaria. The body of an adult jellyfish is composed of a bell-shaped, jellylike substance enclosing its internal structure, from which the tentacles suspend Read More

Galaxies on the go

Scientists have a mystery of cosmic proportions on their hands. Recently astronomers noticed something strange. It seems that millions of stars are racing at high speeds toward a single spot in the sky. Huge collections of stars, gas and dust are called Read More

Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays

Every day, boats full of tourists arrive at Shark Ray Alley, where tour guides feed chunks of fish guts to the animals. Read More

Brain cells take a break

Scientists have long wanted to know what happens inside the human brain when deep asleep. You may be unconscious, but your brain cells are busy with activity. Neurons, brain cells that conduct electricity, keep your mind humming even while your body is re Read More

Sperm Whale

The Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is the largest of all toothed whales and is believed to be the largest toothed animal to ever inhabit Earth, measuring up to 18 m (60 ft) long. Read More

Featured Ads



Winged Insects May Go Way Back

Winged Insects May Go Way Back

A bug may seem creepy, annoying, or cool, depending on its size and your mood. Now you might want to show these critters a little more respect, too. Bugs have been around on Earth for a long, long tim... Read More

Atom Hauler

Atom Hauler

Atoms are everywhere, but you'd never know it. Even though these tiny building blocks of matter make up everything—from chairs to air—they're far too tiny to see with your own eyes. When scientists w... Read More

Pheasants

Pheasants

Pheasants are a group of large birds in the order Galliformes. In many countries they are hunted as game. Pheasant are characterised by strong sexual dimorphism, with males being highly ornate with br... Read More

Sheep

Sheep

The domestic sheep (Ovis aries), the most common species of the sheep genus (Ovis), is a woolly ruminant quadruped which probably descends from the wild mouflon of south-central and south-west Asia. I... Read More

Watching out for vultures

Watching out for vultures

What’s good for one may not be good for all, especially in the animal kingdom. Consider the case of ketoprofen. Ketoprofen is a drug that, like ibuprofen, provides pain relief and reduces swelling. In... Read More

Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats

Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats

Stores are full of high-tech gadgets and gizmos that get more complicated every day. But solutions to technological problems may already exist in the natural world around us. Case in point: Two groups... Read More

Saving Africa's Wild Dogs

Saving Africa's Wild Dogs

For Gregory Rasmussen, a typical workday starts just before sunrise. The wildlife conservation biologist studies African painted dogs in Zimbabwe, and that's when these endangered animals usually wake... Read More

Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections

Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections

Sports are fun, but they can also be dangerous. Broken bones, pulled muscles, and sprained joints are all common injuries among athletes. Now, researchers have identified another possible risk of play... Read More

Basking Sharks

Basking Sharks

The Basking Shark (Cetorhinus maximus), also known as the Bone Shark, is the second largest fish alive, after the Whale Shark. A cosmopolitan species, Basking Sharks are found in all the world's tempe... Read More

Supergoo to the rescue

Supergoo to the rescue

Inside a disposable diaper are tiny crystals of a material called sodium polyacrylate that can absorb hundreds of times their weight in water. Just a small amount of the stuff — sometimes called “Supe... Read More

Vent Worms Like It Hot

Vent Worms Like It Hot

Some worms that live on deep-sea vents can stand temperatures that most other animals on Earth won't tolerate. Now, scientists have tested these worms in the lab to find out exactly how hot the worms... Read More

Indoor ozone stopper

Indoor ozone stopper

Ozone is a chemical that can be both friend and foe to human beings — depending on where it is. In the atmosphere, high overhead, ozone protects Earth from harmful radiation that comes from the sun. ... Read More

Orangutans

Orangutans

The orangutans are two species of great apes with long arms and reddish, sometimes brown, hair native to Malaysia and Indonesia. They are the only extant species in the genus Pongo and the subfamily P... Read More

Flamingos

Flamingos

Flamingos are gregarious wading birds in the genus Phoenicopterus and family Phoenicopteridae. They are found in both the Western and Eastern Hemispheres, but are more numerous in the latter. ... Read More

Math Naturals

Math Naturals

t's probably an exaggeration to say that kids are natural math geniuses. But kindergartners can solve math problems with large numbers long before they officially learn how to add and subtract. By usi... Read More









Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™