Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Seeds of the Future
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Odor-Chasing Penguins
Roboroach and Company
Behavior
Nice Chimps
Video Game Violence
Primate Memory Showdown
Birds
Storks
Kiwis
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Bandages that could bite back
Watching out for vultures
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Computers
New eyes to scan the skies
Lighting goes digital
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Deep Drilling at Sea
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Environment
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
The Wolf and the Cow
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
Fakes in the museum
Settling the Americas
Fish
Skates
Marlin
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
The mercury in that tuna
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Play for Science
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
A Long Haul
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Grasshoppers
Scorpions
Mammals
Shih Tzus
Otters
Gerbils
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
The algae invasion
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Snakes
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
World of Three Suns
Burst Busters
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Young Scientists Take Flight
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Charged cars that would charge
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Dire Shortage of Water
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OwlsOwls - Owls

Owls

An owl is a member of any of 222 currently known species of solitary, mainly nocturnal birds of prey in the order Strigiformes. Owls mostly hunt small mammals, insects, and other birds, though a few species specialize in hunting fish. Read More



Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery

Hidden inside every shiny green emerald is a geographical mystery. Once an emerald is plucked from a mine in its home country and turned into a piece of jewelry, it can be nearly impossible to figure out where the gem came from in the first place. Now, r Read More

Between a rock and a wet place

Life is anything but a vacation for a climbing goby, a small fish that lives in Hawaii. Usually shorter than your thumb, this fish hatches in freshwater high in the hills and mountains. But soon afterward it’s swept out to the salty sea by strong currents Read More

Raccoons

Raccoons are mammals in the genus Procyon of the Procyonidae family. Raccoons are unusual for their thumbs, which (though not opposable) enable them to open many closed containers and doors. Read More

Prime Time for Broken Bones

Kids will be kids. They climb trees. They ride skateboards down steps. They jump off swing-sets. No matter how often adults warn them to be careful, accidents occur and bones break. That's happened generation after generation. Read More

Catching Some Rays

Harnessing the power of the sun is nothing new. People have had solar-powered calculators and buildings with solar panels for decades. But plants are the real experts: They've been using sunlight as an energy source for billions of years. Read More

Watering the Air

The average temperature around the world is rising. People living in the U.S. Midwest might find this fact hard to believe, though. Two new studies show that in America’s heartland, summers are now cooler and wetter than they were in years past. The scien Read More

Brain cells take a break

Scientists have long wanted to know what happens inside the human brain when deep asleep. You may be unconscious, but your brain cells are busy with activity. Neurons, brain cells that conduct electricity, keep your mind humming even while your body is re Read More

Eels

True eels are fish of the order Anguilliformes, which consists of 4 suborders, 19 families, 110 genera and 400 species. Most eels are predators. Depending on their species, eels can reach from 10 cm to 3 m, and weigh up to 65 kg. Read More

Games with a Purpose

There's a new kind of game on the Internet. When you play it, you do more than simply rack up points or have fun. As you play, you help computers develop new skills. Computer scientist Luis von Ahn created the games as a way to solve problems that are di Read More

No Fat Stars

There's a limit to how big most things can get. Some people are really tall, but no one is as tall as a house. Cats can get really fat, but there's never been a tabby as heavy as a truck. And so on. Read More

Riding Sunlight

Hundreds of years ago, sailing ships carried explorers across the ocean from Europe to America and beyond. A future generation of explorers might set sail, too—not across water, but across outer space. Read More

Inspired by Nature

People do a lot of things that plants and animals can't do. We can talk and read. We can play computer games and go snowboarding—stuff that no worm or fern could ever do. Read More

Hermit Crabs

Hermit crabs are crustaceans but, despite the name, distinct from true crab species. Most hermit crabs salvage empty seashells to shelter and protect their soft abdomens. There are about five hundred known species of hermit crabs in the world. Read More

The Secret Lives of Grizzlies

The first time Lynne Nelson entered a den of hibernating grizzly bears, she felt a little nervous. The captive bears had known her since they were babies, but they hadn't eaten in weeks. And each young-adult animal weighed more than 150 pounds. They weren Read More

Siamese Cats

The Siamese is one of the first distinctly recognized breeds of Oriental cat. The exact origins of the breed are unknown, but it is believed to be from Southeast Asia, and is said to be descended from the sacred temple cats of Siam (now Thailand). Read More

Bass

Bass is a name shared by many different species of popular game fish. The term encompasses both freshwater and marine species, many of which are native to North America and surrounding waters. Read More

A Dead Star's Dusty Ring

In 5 billion years, the sun will swell into a huge ball that will fry Earth or even swallow it up. Our star's outer layers will then fly off, and its core will shrink into a dense, fading object called a white dwarf. Read More

Little Beetle, Big Horns

A dung beetle is squirming in my hand. It's only the size of my pinky fingernail, but I can feel its spiny legs poking my skin. I try not to think about where those legs have been. Why? Because I know that Armin Moczek, a biologist at Indiana University Read More

The Essence of Celery

Celery has a certain something, as most chefs will tell you. Even though the vegetable's flavor is mild, it's an ingredient in a variety of soup recipes. Read More

Programming with Alice

Shriveled, slithery, and wily, Gollum is one of the more memorable characters in the Lord of the Rings movies. But it took computers to bring Gollum to life, creating animated images of the character that smoothly blend with the actors on the screen. And Read More

Gut Microbes and Weight

Health experts have long worried about the increasing rate of obesity in kids. It's an important concern: Being very overweight or obese during childhood can lead to serious problems normally seen in adults, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Read More

Tapeworms and Drug Delivery

It's not easy living inside an intestine. But some creatures are happiest in the warm and juicy confines of other animals' digestive systems. A tapeworm called Hymenolepis diminuta, for instance, can live for years in a rat's intestine. Read More

Return to Space

Today's astronauts are willing to take risks, because they believe they're doing something important. Someday, you too could push the limits of human exploration into outer space. When you get there, send me a postcard. Read More

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Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen

Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen

A free flower is a happy flower. Or so it seems. In a recent study, snow buttercup flowers that were free to move with the sun were more likely to produce baby blooms than did flowers that were tied d... Read More

Crime Lab

Crime Lab

Suppose you've just been in a car accident. A sport utility vehicle slammed into your little sedan at high speed. After the impact, your vehicle spun around before crashing into a telephone pole. ... Read More

Catfish

Catfish

Catfish (order Siluriformes) are a diverse group of fish. Named for their prominent "barbels", which give the image of cat-like whiskers, they are found in freshwater environments of all kin... Read More

Rocking the House

Rocking the House

Imagine what it might be like if you were in your bedroom during an earthquake. Your bed shakes. Books and stuffed animals tumble from shelves. Your computer monitor skitters across your desk and cras... Read More

 Bringing fish back up to size

Bringing fish back up to size

Anyone who has ever gone fishing probably knows this general rule: Keep the big ones, throw the smaller ones back. The idea behind the rule is simple — the larger fish are assumed to be older. If you ... Read More

Robins

Robins

The American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. The American Robin is 25-28 cm (10-11 in) long. It has gray upperparts and head, and orange underparts, usually br... Read More

New Monkey Business

New Monkey Business

A new kind of monkey is giving scientists a lot to think about. Two groups of researchers independently discovered the rare creature in different forests in Tanzania last year (see "New Mammals&... Read More

Walking Sticks

Walking Sticks

Phasmids (or Walking Sticks as they are commonly called) are one of the most remarkable orders of insects. They are typically either stick-like or leaf-like; camouflage or mimicry being their defining... Read More

Cockroaches

Cockroaches

Among the most well-known species are the American cockroach, which is about 3 cm long, and the German cockroach, about 1.5 cm long. Tropical cockroaches are often much bigger. When infesting building... Read More

Odor-Chasing Penguins

Odor-Chasing Penguins

The smell of rotten eggs probably makes you cringe. But, for penguins, this smell might mean there's a meal nearby. New research shows that penguins are attracted to this rotten-egg smell and probabl... Read More

Vampire Bats on the Run

Vampire Bats on the Run

Vampire bats sound pretty scary. Even though they suck blood from large mammals, however, they're remarkable creatures. They're smart. They're agile, stealthy night fliers. They have heat sensors in t... Read More

A Living Fossil

A Living Fossil

Imagine going to the museum to see fossils of animals that scientists thought had become extinct millions of years ago. Then, imagine walking outside and seeing one of this family of animals scurrying... Read More

Flamingos

Flamingos

Flamingos are gregarious wading birds in the genus Phoenicopterus and family Phoenicopteridae. They are found in both the Western and Eastern Hemispheres, but are more numerous in the latter. ... Read More

Quokkas

Quokkas

The Quokka (Setonix brachyurus) is a small macropod, about the size of a large domestic cat. Like other marsupials in the macropod family (such as the kangaroos and wallabies), the Quokka is herbivoro... Read More

Eating Troubles

Eating Troubles

We all have to eat, but choosing the right foods can be hard. Many people also have trouble controlling how much they eat. Instead of eating reasonable portions of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, an... Read More









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