Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Animals
Mating Slows Down Prairie Dogs
Chicken Talk
Polar Bears in Trouble
Behavior
Homework blues
A brain-boosting video game
Bringing fish back up to size
Birds
Robins
Backyard Birds
Flightless Birds
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
Screaming for Ice Cream
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Computers
A Light Delay
Computers with Attitude
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
An Ancient Spider's Web
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Plastic-munching microbes
Quick Quake Alerts
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Environment
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Snow Traps
Little Bits of Trouble
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
Settling the Americas
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Hammerhead Sharks
Freshwater Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
The Essence of Celery
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
A New Touch
Music in the Brain
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Walking Sticks
Mollusks
Insects
Mammals
Rhinoceros
Aquatic Animals
St. Bernards
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
IceCube Science
Powering Ball Lightning
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Crocodilians
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Cousin Earth
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Algae Motors
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Arctic Melt
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Welcome to the articles page!

Assembling the Tree of LifeAssembling the Tree of Life - Assembling the Tree of Life

Assembling the Tree of Life

It's easy to see how you're related to your parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters, and cousins. It's not so easy to see how you're related to apple trees, worms, or elephants. Read More



Anacondas

Anacondas are four species of aquatic boa inhabiting the swamps and rivers of the dense forests of tropical South America as well as the southern swamps of the island of Trinidad. The Yellow Anaconda can be found as far south as Argentina. Read More

Elk

The elk (Cervus elaphus) are the second largest species of deer in the world, after Alces alces (the moose or, in Europe, elk). Elk are found in nearly every country in Europe. Read More

Food for Life

A hamburger or a salad? A baked potato or French fries? A milkshake or orange juice? A candy bar or an apple? We have to make choices about what we eat every day. Read More

Shrimps

True shrimp are small, swimming crustaceans classified in the infraorder Caridea, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. A number of more or less unrelated crustaceans also have the word "shrimp" in their common names. Read More

Flying the Hyper Skies

A little airplane has given new meaning to the term "going hyper." The Hyper-X recently broke the record for air-breathing jet planes when it traveled at a hypersonic speed of seven times the speed of sound. That's about 5,000 miles per hour. Read More

Spin, Splat, and Scramble

Having fun? Take a break and give this some thought: Science can help you play better. Read More

Stunts for High-Diving Ants

Make way for a new kind of stunt-creature: ants. Some tree-dwelling ants that live in the tropics can twist themselves in the air to change the direction of their tumbles when they fall. They end up catching on to the trunk and climbing back home. It's l Read More

Numbats

The numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) is a small marsupial native to western and southern Australia with a number of unique features. The ecologically vulnerable numbat is the sole member of the genus Myrmecobius and the family Myrmecobiidae. Read More

Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children! By MATT H

Experts claim that reading to children is important for various reasons. While most parents realise this is true, how many actually understand why parent-and-child reading is so widely encouraged? What does the child gain for the experience and what Read More

Results of GSAT are in schools this week By Teach It To Kids GSAT Jamaica

Education Minister Ronald Thwaites said while the average scores in the various subjects written in this year sitting of the Grade Six Achievement Test – GSAT - have improved over the last six years, the levels were not satisfactory. Read More

Chameleons

Chameleons are known for their ability to change their color, their elongated, sticky tongue, and for their eyes which can be moved independently of each other. The name "chameleon" means "earth lion". Read More

Contemplating thought

Think back to the first time you rode a bike or the last time you had ice cream for dessert. Now, imagine a perfect summer day. What’s going on in your noggin’ that allows you to remember, dream and think? Lots. And some of the world’s brainiest scientis Read More

Ibises

Ibises are a group of long-legged wading birds in the family Threskiornithidae. They all have long down curved bills, and usually feed as a group, probing mud for food items, usually crustaceans. Read More

Toy Challenge

You probably have a favorite game that you just can't wait to play. Your friends might have their own ideas about what's fun and what's not. Have you ever thought about joining forces and creating a game that everyone would love? Read More

Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth

As the star of Jurassic Park III, the spinosaurus dominated the screen, displaying a huge sail on its back and baring distinctive teeth. Millions of years ago, this large, meat-eating dinosaur may have hunted fish. Its long snout and narrow jaws resemble Read More

The algae invasion

Algae: You know it when you see it. It’s the slimy green carpet that blankets the top of ponds or neglected swimming pools. It may be long strands of seaweed, sometimes used for fertilizer or food, that sway with the ocean tide. Read More

Flu Patrol

Each winter, the flu makes its rounds, jumping from victim to victim at schools and in offices. Miserable kids and adults stay at home in bed or go to the hospital with fevers, sniffles, sore throats, muscle aches, and coughs. Read More

Pumping Up Poison Ivy

It itches and oozes. With its red bumps, a poison ivy rash can make you miserable. A new study suggests that rising levels of the gas carbon dioxide in the atmosphere could make poison ivy grow faster and become more toxic. Read More

GSAT Exam Tips for 2014

In multiple choice exercises, GSAT examiners have been known to use the same letter for the correct answer several times in succession (a, a, a, a, a, etc). This is unsettling and can make students worry that their answers must be wrong; it does not. Read More

Felines

Felines a family of carnivorous mammals, varying widely in size, coloration, and behavior, although a few physical similarities apply. Feline bodies are normally long and slender, with muscles suited to running, leaping and climbing. Read More

Unveiling Titan

There's no place like home. Except, maybe, for Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A recent mission to this moon has found that it looks a lot like our planet. Read More

Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders

Talk about winging it. The albatross is an amazing glider. In windy weather, these ocean birds can stay airborne for hours without flapping their enormous wings. They've been known to follow ships for days to feed on garbage. Today, there are about 17 sp Read More

A Classroom of the Mind

You're sitting at your desk. A teacher is writing on the chalkboard. A bus rumbles past the window. Kids are yelling in the playground outside. A paper airplane whizzes overhead. The school principal steps into the room, looks around, and walks out. A boo Read More

Featured Ads



Chicken

Chicken

A chicken is a type of domesticated bird which is often raised as a type of poultry. It is believed to be descended from the wild Indian and south-east Asian Red Junglefowl. They provide two sources o... Read More

A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?

A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?

Before the invention of central heating and hot cocoa, it would have been too cold for people to migrate to North America through the frigid tundra—without trees or firewood. Or so scientists thought.... Read More

No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't

No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't

You have to go to bed earlier than usual. Your friend gets more ice cream in her cone, even though you asked for the same size. The whole class is punished for one student's outburst. Every day, life... Read More

Seeing red means danger ahead

Seeing red means danger ahead

The color red often means danger — and by paying attention, accidents can be prevented. At railroad crossings, flashing red lights warn cars to stay back. A red light at a traffic intersection tells c... Read More

Fungus Hunt

Fungus Hunt

There are lots of ways to enjoy mushrooms. You can put portabellas on pizzas. You can sauté shitakes with butter and garlic. You can hunt for morels in the woods. Or you can study porcinis under a mic... Read More

Earth's Poles in Peril

Earth's Poles in Peril

The North and South poles are remote and frigid places that receive lots of animal visitors but few human tourists. But even if you never plan to visit the polar bears in the north or penguins in the ... Read More

A Jellyfish's Blurry View

A Jellyfish's Blurry View

When you see a jellyfish, you might think, "looks like a blob." But what would a jellyfish see if it could look at us? For certain types of jellyfish, the view would be decidedly fuzzy. Res... Read More

Manta Rays

Manta Rays

The manta ray, or giant manta (Manta birostris), is the largest of the rays, ranging up to 6.7 meters (22 ft) across its pectoral fins (or "wings") and weighing up to 1,350 kg (3,000 lb). ... Read More

Popping to Perfection

Popping to Perfection

You're at the movies. The feature's starting. You've got a soda in one hand and a bucket of popcorn in the other. Just as the opening scene begins to suck you in, you crunch down on a mouthful of popc... Read More

Octopuses

Octopuses

The octopus is a cephalopod of the order Octopoda that inhabits many diverse regions of the ocean, especially coral reefs. The term may also refer to only those creatures in the genus Octopus.... Read More

African Elephants

African Elephants By African Elephants

Loxodonta is a genus in Elephantidae, the family of elephants and is divided into two species: The African Bush Elephant (Loxodonta africana) and he African Forest Elephant.... Read More

Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery

Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery

For decades, "Site Q" has been a mystery city. Archaeologists suspected that this Maya settlement existed more than 1,400 years ago, but there was little evidence to link it with certainty t... Read More

Calculating crime

Calculating crime

When you think about math, you probably don’t think about breaking the law, solving mysteries or finding criminals. But a mathematician in Maryland does, and he has come up with mathematical tools to ... Read More

Flush-Free Fertilizer

Flush-Free Fertilizer

Most urine ends up in the toilet, as it should. But the garden may be another appropriate place to send human pee, according to scientists in Finland. The yellow liquid appears to help cabbages grow. ... Read More

Losing with Heads or Tails

Losing with Heads or Tails

Heads, you win. Tails, you lose. It turns out that coin tosses may be less fair than you might think. A new mathematical analysis even suggests a way to increase your chances of winning. ... Read More









Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™