Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Salamanders
Animals
Cool Penguins
Monkey Math
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
Behavior
Calculating crime
The nerve of one animal
The Electric Brain
Birds
Kiwis
Kookaburras
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Batteries built by Viruses
A Spider's Silky Strength
The hottest soup in New York
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Earth from the inside out
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
The man who rocked biology to its core
A Dino King's Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Earth's Poles in Peril
Plastic-munching microbes
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Environment
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
An Ocean View's Downside
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Writing on eggshells
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Tilapia
Hammerhead Sharks
Megamouth Sharks
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Food for Life
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Scholarship
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
Foul Play?
Dreaming makes perfect
Invertebrates
Centipedes
Daddy Long Legs
Bedbugs
Mammals
Miniature Schnauzers
Beagles
Platypus
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Speedy stars
One ring around them all
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Farms sprout in cities
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
Melting Snow on Mars
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Killers from Outer Space
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Troubles with Hubble
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
A Change in Climate
Warmest Year on Record
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

Welcome to the articles page!

TarantulaTarantula - Tarantula

Tarantula

True tarantulas are spiders belonging to the family Theraphosidae (Greek for thera "wild animal, beast" + phos "light"). These spiders may also be known as bird spiders, monkey spiders, baboon spiders or rain spiders. Read More



Boa Constrictors

Boas are a type of snake that are members of the Boidae family. Boas are basal snakes that are "primitive" in evolutionary terms (i.e. less derived). They are constrictors and give birth to live young. Read More

When frog gender flips

Several months ago, a California college student working at a university laboratory checked up on a group of frogs and saw some unusual behavior. Some of the frogs were acting like females — which was unusual, since at the beginning of the experiment all Read More

Dodos

The Mauritius Dodo (Raphus cucullatus, called Didus ineptus by Linnaeus), more commonly just Dodo, was a metre-high flightless bird of the island of Mauritius. The Dodo, which is currently extinct, lived on fruit and nested on the ground. Read More

African Hippopotamus

The Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius also known as river-horse) is a large, plant-eating African mammal, one of only two extant, and three or four recently extinct, species in the family Hippopotamidae. Read More

Stonehenge Settlement

Stonehenge has mystified visitors for thousands of years. Somehow, about 4,600 years ago, people managed to haul humongous stones across southern England to a site on the Salisbury Plain. Read More

Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays

Every day, boats full of tourists arrive at Shark Ray Alley, where tour guides feed chunks of fish guts to the animals. Read More

African Ostrich

The ostrich (Struthio camelus) is a flightless bird native to Africa. It is the only living species of its family, Struthionidae, and its genus, Struthio. Read More

A Great Quake Coming?

Everyone who lives in San Francisco knows that earthquakes are common in the Bay Area—and they can be devastating. One hundred years ago this month, for example, a major quake destroyed about 28,000 buildings and killed hundreds, perhaps thousands of peop Read More

A brain-boosting video game

In the video game Tetris, players try to pack as many shapes as possible into a small space. According to a new study, that’s not all they’re doing: Scientists found a connection between playing Tetris and the size of part of the brain. Read More

Basking Sharks

The Basking Shark (Cetorhinus maximus), also known as the Bone Shark, is the second largest fish alive, after the Whale Shark. A cosmopolitan species, Basking Sharks are found in all the world's temperate oceans. Read More

Coral Gardens

On their first visit to Davidson Seamount in 2002, scientists realized that they had discovered a very unusual place. What was once an underwater volcano has become home to an unexpectedly diverse community of enormous and colorful sea creatures. Read More

Insects Take a Breather

Without oxygen, we'd be in big trouble. The gas, which makes up 21 percent of Earth's atmosphere, keeps alive the cells that make up our bodies. But there's such a thing as too much oxygen. Extra oxygen can damage tissues. Insects need oxygen to live, to Read More

Caimans

Although the Caiman has not been studied in-depth, it has been discovered that their mating cycles are linked to the rainfall cycles and the river levels in order to increase their offspring's chances of survival. Read More

Wasps

Wasp is the common name applied to most species of hymenopteran insects, except bees and ants. Insects known as wasps include the sawflies, the parasitic wasps, and the stinging wasps, which are the best known. Read More

Lhasa Apsos

The Lhasa Apso is a small breed of dog originally from Tibet. They were used as watchdogs inside Tibetan monasteries for over 1200 years, for which they are uniquely suited with keen intelligence, acute hearing, and instincts for identifying friends. Read More

A Whale's Amazing Tooth

The narwhal looks as if it belongs in a fairy tale. Or maybe a myth. This unusual whale has a long, straight tooth, or tusk, that resembles the horn of a unicorn. Most male and some female narwhals have such a tusk. It sticks out from the left side of the Read More

Felines

Felines a family of carnivorous mammals, varying widely in size, coloration, and behavior, although a few physical similarities apply. Feline bodies are normally long and slender, with muscles suited to running, leaping and climbing. Read More

A Tongue and a Half

If there were a prize for animal rudeness, a small South American bat would surely be in the running. The creature doesn't just stick out its tongue. It shoots it way, way out. In fact, its tongue is longer than its body. At 1.5 times the animal's body l Read More

Narwhals

The Narwhal (Monodon monoceros) is an Arctic species of cetacean with a body similar to that of a Beluga whale and Irrawaddy dolphin. It is rare creature found south of latitude 70°N. It is one of two species of whale in the Monodontidae family. Read More

Iguanas

Iguanas tend to have tall, flat plates jutting from their back like spines, when adult. Several species of this genus are common as pets, especially the Green Iguana in the United States and Canada, which can easily grow to six feet long. Read More

Woodpecker

Woodpeckers are near passerine birds of the order Piciformes. They are found worldwide and include numerous species, usually numbered at 218 (including the Ivory-billed). The woodpecker first locates a tunnel by tapping on the trunk. Read More

A New Look at Saturn's rings

Many students know that to figure out the age of a tree, you count the number of rings that make up its trunk, one ring for each year. But what if you wanted to know the age of the rings that surround the planet Saturn? It's a tricky question that scient Read More

Clams

Clams are shelled marine or freshwater mollusks. The term "clam" is often used to refer to any bivalve (a mollusk whose body is protected by two symmetrical shells) that is not an oyster, mussel, or a scallop, and that has a more-or-less oval shape. Read More

Featured Ads



Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life

Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life

You've heard it before: If you know what's good for you, you'll go to bed on time. Now, scientists are saying something more about going to sleep. And you may lose more than just TV privileges if you ... Read More

Planning for Mars

Planning for Mars

Forget the moon: We’re headed to Mars. That’s one message President Obama delivered on April 15, during a speech about the future of the U.S. space program.... Read More

Toy Challenge

Toy Challenge

You probably have a favorite game that you just can't wait to play. Your friends might have their own ideas about what's fun and what's not. Have you ever thought about joining forces and creating a g... Read More

Model Plane Flies the Atlantic

Model Plane Flies the Atlantic

When Maynard Hill decided he wanted to fly a model airplane across the Atlantic Ocean, no one took him seriously.... Read More

Workouts: Does Stretching Help?

Workouts: Does Stretching Help?

Touch your toes. Reach for the sky. Twist from side to side. If you've ever played on a sports team or gone to gym class, you probably know the drill. First, you do some warmups. Then you stretch. Exe... Read More

Growing Healthier Tomato Plants

Growing Healthier Tomato Plants

If you've ever tried to grow your own flowers or vegetables, you know that gardening is an art as much as it is a science. The science part just took a step forward, at least for tomatoes. ... Read More

Flu river

Flu river

What if the solution to one problem causes other problems down the road? That may be the case in the ongoing struggle to fight the flu. Flu season is almost here, which means more and more people may ... Read More

The two faces of Mars

The two faces of Mars

When you look up at the night sky, it's hard to imagine the violent, chaotic place the solar system was billions of years ago. It looks quiet and peaceful now, but when the solar system first took sha... Read More

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to wa... Read More

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step... Read More

Pheasants

Pheasants

Pheasants are a group of large birds in the order Galliformes. In many countries they are hunted as game. Pheasant are characterised by strong sexual dimorphism, with males being highly ornate with br... Read More

Eating Troubles

Eating Troubles

We all have to eat, but choosing the right foods can be hard. Many people also have trouble controlling how much they eat. Instead of eating reasonable portions of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, an... Read More

An Earthlike Planet

An Earthlike Planet

Astronomers don't know whether life exists on other planets. But if it does, it's most likely to be found on a planet that has liquid water. Water, after all, is essential to life on Earth.... Read More

Healing Honey

Healing Honey

Coughs, sniffles, sneezes, runny noses: Colds and other nasty lung infections are especially common in winter. To fight the misery, many people swallow syrups and pills that claim to clear stuffy nose... Read More

Hair Detectives

Hair Detectives

You can tell a lot about people by looking at their hair—and not just whether they brush, spray, or blow-dry. Scientists have found a way to use hair to figure out where a person is from and where th... Read More









Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™