Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Polar Bears in Trouble
Fishy Cleaners
Insects Take a Breather
Behavior
The nerve of one animal
Bringing fish back up to size
Body clocks
Birds
Finches
Flamingos
Songbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Graphene's superstrength
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Supersonic Splash
Computers
Programming with Alice
Batteries built by Viruses
Troubles with Hubble
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
A Big, Weird Dino
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Global Warming Flap
A Volcano Wakes Up
Deep History
Environment
What is groundwater
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Flu river
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Settling the Americas
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Swordfish
Megamouth Sharks
Tilapia
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Packing Fat
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Heart Revival
Invertebrates
Dragonflies
Grasshoppers
Shrimps
Mammals
Wolverines
Hamsters
Cocker Spaniels
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Project Music
Speedy stars
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Assembling the Tree of Life
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Caimans
Iguanas
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Planets on the Edge
Cool as a Jupiter
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Algae Motors
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Flying the Hyper Skies
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Earth's Poles in Peril
A Change in Climate
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Tropical BirdsTropical Birds - Tropical Birds

Tropical Birds

While local wild birds offer their own uniqe birdwatching experience, tropical climates and rainforest environments seem to attract the most vibrantly colored and exotic of bird species; from rainbow lorikeets to vibrant macaws. Read More



The Other Side of the Zoo Fence

Architects often have to deal with difficult clients, but Lee Ehmke's customers are especially hard to work for. They sleep through meetings. They never pay. They don't even use bathrooms when they have to go. Read More

Got Milk? How?

We put it in cereal. We drink it with cookies. And we eat tons of foods that are made from it, including yogurt, cheese and even some crackers, breads and granola bars. For most of us, milk is a staple that would be hard to live without. Thousands of yea Read More

Quolls

Quolls or native cats (genus Dasyurus) are carnivorous marsupials, native to Australia and Papua New Guinea. Adults are between 25 and 75 cm long, with hairy tails about 20-35 cm long. Read More

Songbirds

Listen outside in any season, at almost any time of day, and you'll hear them: songbirds. Although most birds make some kind of noise, songbirds put on a particularly brilliant show, using their voices to produce pleasing whistles, and chirps. Read More

Sea Giants and Island Pygmies

The natural world is full of extremes. Elephants and whales are huge. Minnows and mice are small. But it's also possible to find pygmy elephants, enormous rodents, and giant squid. Such surprising size variations have sent scientists scrambling to unders Read More

Blue Whales

Blue whales were abundant in most oceans around the world until the beginning of the twentieth century. For the first 40 years of that century they were hunted by whalers almost to extinction. Read More

Dolphins

Dolphins are aquatic mammals related to whales and porpoises, famous for their intelligence, apparent compassion, and joy. The name is from Ancient Greek δελφίς (delphis) meaning "with a womb", viz. "a 'fish' with a womb". Read More

Fossil Fly from Antarctica

Even if you hate winter, there is at least one nice thing about cold weather and snow: no bugs. Or so you thought. A tiny fly fossil has turned up in Antarctica, about 500 kilometers from the South Pole. Scientists previously thought that the icy contine Read More

Centipedes

Centipedes (Class Chilopoda) are fast-moving venomous, predatory terrestrial arthropods that have long bodies and many jointed legs. Chiefly nocturnal, centipedes are found primarily in tropical climates. Read More

A Moon's Icy Spray

At Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, geysers such as the famous Old Faithful regularly spout water hundreds of feet into the air. The jets are impressive, but they're nothing compared to geysers on one of Saturn's moons. Read More

Wave of Destruction

It was a nightmare come true. On Dec. 26, 2004, a huge wall of water rose from the Indian Ocean and slammed into the coasts of countries in Asia and Africa. The giant wave, called a tsunami, washed people out of their homes and swept them off beaches. F Read More

Gazelle

A gazelle is an antelope of the genus Gazella. Gazelles are known as swift animals; they are able to reach high speeds for long periods of time. Gazelles are mostly found in the grasslands and savannas of Africa, but they are also found Asia (SW). Read More

Giving Sharks Safe Homes

Being surrounded by sharks may sound like a bad thing, but scientists say sharks are actually a good sign of ocean health. Even knowing that, Enric Sala, a marine ecologist and National Geographic Fellow, was a little nervous when he first dived at Kingma Read More

A Change in Leaf Color

Every autumn, traffic creeps along New England's roads as visitors look everywhere but at the road. These tourists flock to the region as soon as leaves begin to change color from a summery green to spectacular shades of red, orange, yellow... Read More

Scallops

Scallops are the family Pectinidae of bivalve molluscs. Like the true oysters, they have a central adductor muscle, and thus their shells have a characteristic central scar marking its point of attachment. Read More

Detecting True Art

Real or fake? In the world of art, that can be an expensive question. Famous paintings by classic artists can sell for millions of dollars. To make a quick buck, people sometimes try to sell paintings that are imitations of the real thing. Read More

Arctic Algae Show Climate Change

Tiny creatures in remote lakes are adding to the evidence for global warming. Most scientists agree that the climate is heating up. Studies of environments all over the world show that the warming has wide-ranging effects.A recent study focused on changes Read More

Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste

There's nothing scientific about the way I shop for toothpaste. One brand happens to have the same name as the street on which I grew up. So, that's the kind I buy. Quite a bit of science, however, goes into making toothpaste. Every year, toothpaste comp Read More

Cool Penguins

Raising a baby takes a lot of work, especially when that baby is a king penguin. Now, it looks like climate change will make life even harder for these birds. A new study suggests that warmer waters could shrink their numbers. Read More

Bulldogs

The Bulldog (often called the English Bulldog or British Bulldog) is a medium-sized dog breed that originated in England. The Bulldog is a relatively small but stocky breed, with a compact body and short, sturdy limbs. Read More

A Wild Ferret Rise

Black-footed ferrets used to be in big trouble. The furry long-necked creatures look like a cross between a raccoon and a weasel, and they are North America's only native ferret species. By the late 1970s, however, scientists thought black-footed ferrets Read More

Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison

Five years ago, marine biologist Raphael Ritson-Williams was collecting flatworms in the waters around the Pacific island of Guam, when he found a new species. He put the oval, filmy, yellow flatworm in a container for further study. Read More

Lighting goes digital

Computers have transformed our lives so completely that it’s difficult to remember what life was like before the digital age. But only a few decades ago, people used typewriters for writing, and calculators solved math and money issues. You couldn’t pull Read More

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Sea Urchin

Sea Urchin

Sea urchins are spiny sea creatures of the class Echinoidea found in oceans all over the world. (The name comes from their resemblance to hedgehogs, hedgehog being one meaning of the word "urchin... Read More

Wasps

Wasps

Wasp is the common name applied to most species of hymenopteran insects, except bees and ants. Insects known as wasps include the sawflies, the parasitic wasps, and the stinging wasps, which are the b... Read More

Nanomagnets Corral Oil

Nanomagnets Corral Oil

You’ve probably seen some of the cool things magnets can do. Place one near a paper clip, and the clip zooms across the table toward the magnet. Hold one magnet near another, and the second one myster... Read More

Weird, new ant

Weird, new ant

In the Amazon rainforests of Brazil, scientists have discovered a peculiar new species of ant. The insect has no eyes. Its body is pale. And its fanglike mouthparts are longer than the rest of its hea... Read More

A Family in Space

A Family in Space

In a distant region of our solar system, scientists have found a group of related objects that have similar surfaces and orbits. It's the first "family" of objects ever discovered in the Kui... Read More

Slip Sliming Away

Slip Sliming Away

Slugs and snails produce slime that looks a lot like the stuff that comes out of your nose. These creatures don't use tissues to wipe up their snot, though. Instead, they use the goo to help them stic... Read More

Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins

Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins

New evidence from satellites and weather stations suggests that way down south, Antarctica is feeling the heat. And that’s not good news for penguins. Scientists studying climate change knew some coas... Read More

Giant Clam

Giant Clam

The giant clam (Tridacna gigas) or traditionally, pa’ua, is the largest living bivalve mollusc. Stationary in adulthood, the creature's mantle tissues act as a habitat for the symbiotic single-celled ... Read More

Dust Mites

Dust Mites

The house dust mite (sometimes abbreviated by allergists to HDM), is a cosmopolitan guest in human habitation. Dust mites flourish in the controlled environment provided to them by buildings. ... Read More

Wrong-way planets do gymnastics

Wrong-way planets do gymnastics

Cartwheels aren’t just for gymnasts anymore — a gang of distant, unusual planets, a team of astronomers say, may have done giant, deep-space cartwheels to get into place.... Read More

African Jackal

African Jackal

A jackal is any of four small to medium-sized members of the family Canidae, found in Africa and Asia. ... Read More

African Ostrich

African Ostrich

The ostrich (Struthio camelus) is a flightless bird native to Africa. It is the only living species of its family, Struthionidae, and its genus, Struthio. ... Read More

Talking with Hands

Talking with Hands

Thumbs up. A friendly wave. A threatening fist. All these hand gestures are part of the body language that we use to communicate every day. ... Read More

Fingerprinting Fossils

Fingerprinting Fossils

A bone is a bone is a bone. Or so it seems. To an untrained eye, a fossilized bone doesn't tell much of a story. Scientists, on the other hand, can date a fossil with amazing precision. They can also... Read More

A Long Haul

A Long Haul

Long before the invention of cars, planes, or motorboats, people were exploring the globe. Some of these travelers undertook trips of thousands of miles across oceans. ... Read More









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