Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Clone Wars
Fishing for Giant Squid
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
How Much Babies Know
The Snappy Lingo of Instant Messages
Birds
Tropical Birds
Parakeets
Cassowaries
Chemistry and Materials
Sticky Silky Feet
Sugary Survival Skill
Diamond Glow
Computers
New eyes to scan the skies
Play for Science
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Supersight for a Dino King
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Quick Quake Alerts
A Great Quake Coming?
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Environment
Giant snakes invading North America
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Saving Wetlands
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Parrotfish
Hagfish
Tiger Sharks
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
The Essence of Celery
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Taste Messenger
Disease Detectives
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Arachnids
Flatworms
Insects
Mammals
Humpback Whales
St. Bernards
Rhinoceros
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Nature's Alphabet
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Anacondas
Snakes
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
Return to Space
Sounds of Titan
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
How to Fly Like a Bat
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Recipe for a Hurricane
A Change in Climate
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Arctic Melt Arctic Melt - Arctic Melt

Arctic Melt

Earth's North and South Poles are famous for being cold and icy. Normally, ice builds in Arctic waters around the North Pole each winter and shrinks during the summer. But for many years, the amount of ice left by the end of summer has been declining Read More



From dipping to fishing

Chimpanzees not only share our ability to use tools. They also share our ability to create tools for a specific purpose. A group of Japanese scientists recently witnessed this inventiveness in action. The researchers watched a 5-year-old chimp named JJ u Read More

Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago

Being eaten alive would be awful, especially if you were gulped down by a weird beast with an extremely long neck. Recently discovered fossils suggest that a prehistoric sea creature with such a snakelike neck could have sucked in prey. It's the first ex Read More

Quokkas

The Quokka (Setonix brachyurus) is a small macropod, about the size of a large domestic cat. Like other marsupials in the macropod family (such as the kangaroos and wallabies), the Quokka is herbivorous and mainly nocturnal. Read More

Revving Up Green Machines

People love their "zoom, zoom." In the United States alone, 17 million new cars hit the road in 2004. But the freedom to travel anywhere, anytime in a car or truck comes at a price. And it's not just the cost of gasoline, insurance, and repairs. Automobi Read More

Power of the Wind

On a breezy day, you can feel the wind in your hair, on your face, against your body. It tickles, pushes, or slams into you, depending on how hard it's blowing. When it's windy, you can fly a kite or go sailing. Read More

Catfish

Catfish (order Siluriformes) are a diverse group of fish. Named for their prominent "barbels", which give the image of cat-like whiskers, they are found in freshwater environments of all kinds, with species on every continent except Antarctica. Read More

Hints of Life in Ancient Lava

When you hear the word "lava," your first thought might be of volcanoes violently spewing molten rock. Lava is full of surprises, though. Scientists now say they have found old lava that contains some of the earliest traces of life on Earth. Read More

Nurse Sharks

Nurse sharks are cosmopolitan carpet sharks belonging to the family Ginglymostomatidae. Common in shallow, tropical and subtropical waters of the western Atlantic and eastern Pacific, the family comprises three genera each with one species. Read More

Galaxies far, far, far away

How old are the objects you can see in the sky? The brightest star in the night sky, Sirius, is believed to be about 200-300 million years old. The Sun and Moon are much older—about 4.5 billion years old. New pictures taken by a telescope in space show a Read More

Gliders in the Family

Watching monkeys at the zoo can be fascinating because the animals' actions are so similar to those of people. Along with gorillas, orangutans, lemurs, and others, monkeys belong to a group of mammals called primates. People are primates, too. Now, scien Read More

The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming

On October 7, 2008, an asteroid the size of a car blazed through the atmosphere and crashed into the Nubian Desert in the African nation of Sudan. Eyewitnesses who were looking up at the sky at the time reported seeing a fireball over the desert when the Read More

Fungus Hunt

There are lots of ways to enjoy mushrooms. You can put portabellas on pizzas. You can sauté shitakes with butter and garlic. You can hunt for morels in the woods. Or you can study porcinis under a microscope. Scientists do all of these things. Read More

Inspired by Nature

People do a lot of things that plants and animals can't do. We can talk and read. We can play computer games and go snowboarding—stuff that no worm or fern could ever do. Read More

Bull Sharks

Bull sharks are common in warm, shallow waters along coasts throughout the world. They are known for their particularly unpredictable behavior, as they often travel up rivers and can pose a large threat to those who venture in to the water there. Read More

Songbirds

Listen outside in any season, at almost any time of day, and you'll hear them: songbirds. Although most birds make some kind of noise, songbirds put on a particularly brilliant show, using their voices to produce pleasing whistles, and chirps. Read More

Bears

Bears are among the largest carnivores, characterized by stocky bodies, short tails, long, square snouts, and round ears. North American bears are common to wooded areas, where streams can provide an opportunity to fish year round. Read More

Helping the Cause of Macaws

Deep in the steamy Peruvian jungle, a macaw spreads her brilliant scarlet feathers over her three squirming chicks. She pokes her great beak out the door of the wooden box where she has made her nest and waits for her mate to return with food. Fifty feet Read More

A Stormy History

In the past few years, hurricanes such as Charlie, Frances, and Katrina have brought destruction and heartache to the southeastern United States. A new analysis, however, suggests that the number of severe hurricanes we've seen recently is normal. Read More

In Search of the Perfect French Fry

The perfect French fry means different things to different people. You might like them McDonald's-style: straight, skinny, and golden brown. But you probably know people who like the spicy kind that twist around like corkscrews. Read More

Perches

Perch are a group of freshwater fish belonging to the family Percidae. Perch have "rough" or ctenoid scales. When looking through a microscope, the scales look like plates with growth rings and spikes on their top edges. Read More

Alien Invasions

Around the world, plants, animals, fungi, and other life forms are moving into places where they don't belong. These raids can mean major headaches for both wildlife and people. Read More

Fish needs see-through head

The fish in the picture is alive and you’re looking inside its head. Really. It’s not a medical freak. Just a kind of fish with a naturally see-through forehead. A new species, you might think. But no. The story is odder than that. Meet one of the fish Read More

Spin, Splat, and Scramble

Having fun? Take a break and give this some thought: Science can help you play better. Read More

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Dancing with Robots

Dancing with Robots

Sprague's Sprockets, a team of two boys and two girls, waited nervously for its turn at the search-and-rescue station as the RoboCup Junior competition got under way. ... Read More

An Ancient Feathered Biplane

An Ancient Feathered Biplane

When the Wright Brothers lifted off at Kitty Hawk in 1903, they flew a plane with two sets of wings, one below the other. Their feat went down in history as the first successful flight by a heavier-th... Read More

Taste Messenger

Taste Messenger

It can be hard to imagine life without a sense of taste. Ice cream would feel cold and smooth without the sweetness. Peanut butter would seem sticky and thick without the nuttiness. Apples would be cr... Read More

Roving the Red Planet

Roving the Red Planet

This little robot is a long way from home. Spirit, a remote-controlled rover with six chunky wheels, made its first outing on Mars last week. But Spirit has gotten into trouble. ... Read More

Prime Time for Cicadas

Prime Time for Cicadas

If it hasn't happened yet, it could occur any day now. The first signs are little holes in the ground in yards, orchards, and fields. Then, one warm evening, big, red-eyed bugs start crawling out of t... Read More

Growing Healthier Tomato Plants

Growing Healthier Tomato Plants

If you've ever tried to grow your own flowers or vegetables, you know that gardening is an art as much as it is a science. The science part just took a step forward, at least for tomatoes. ... Read More

Holes in Martian moon mystery

Holes in Martian moon mystery

The Martian moon Phobos is cratered, lumpy and about 16.8 miles long, or 3 miles longer than the island of Manhattan. According to a recent study, the moon is also unusually light.... Read More

Pondering the puzzling platypus

Pondering the puzzling platypus

The first European scientist who saw a platypus thought it was a fake. In the late 18th century, British scientist George Shaw received a package from the governor of Australia. Shaw found strange th... Read More

Chew for Health

Chew for Health

Most schools ban chewing gum, but in a few years they might consider changing that rule. Why? Scientists are finding evidence that gum chewing may be good for your health. It may even help boost your ... Read More

Primates

Primates

Primates make up a small but diverse number of species, including human beings. Primates have hands or paws that are able to grasp items, fingernails instead of claws, and eyes that face forward (inst... Read More

Workouts: Does Stretching Help?

Workouts: Does Stretching Help?

Touch your toes. Reach for the sky. Twist from side to side. If you've ever played on a sports team or gone to gym class, you probably know the drill. First, you do some warmups. Then you stretch. Exe... Read More

Winged Insects May Go Way Back

Winged Insects May Go Way Back

A bug may seem creepy, annoying, or cool, depending on its size and your mood. Now you might want to show these critters a little more respect, too. Bugs have been around on Earth for a long, long tim... Read More

Hermit Crabs

Hermit Crabs

Hermit crabs are crustaceans but, despite the name, distinct from true crab species. Most hermit crabs salvage empty seashells to shelter and protect their soft abdomens. There are about five hundred ... Read More

Sounds and Silence

Sounds and Silence

People often visit parks to find a sense of peace and solitude they can't get at home. Animals use sounds to communicate with one another. ... Read More

Digging for Ancient DNA

Digging for Ancient DNA

In the movie Jurassic Park, scientists discover fossilized insects that had eaten dinosaur blood just before they died. The dino blood is full of DNA—the instruction manual of life—and the scientists ... Read More









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