Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Walks on the Wild Side
Big Squid
G-Tunes with a Message
Behavior
A Global Warming Flap
Fighting fat with fat
Brain cells take a break
Birds
Woodpecker
Parakeets
Lovebirds
Chemistry and Materials
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Revving Up Green Machines
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Middle school science adventures
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Springing forward
Environment
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Settling the Americas
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Bull Sharks
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Healing Honey
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Germ Zapper
Foul Play?
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Dragonflies
Centipedes
Beetles
Mammals
Pugs
Humpback Whales
Spectacled Bear
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Invisibility Ring
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
A Change in Leaf Color
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Crocodiles
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Saturn's New Moons
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Troubles with Hubble
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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The memory of a material The memory of a material - The memory of a material

The memory of a material

Nafion is a useful material that has been around since the 1960s, but don’t be surprised if you’ve never heard of it. It was first made by a chemist at DuPont, a company that makes chemicals, and it is a common ingredient in fuel cells. (Fuel cells, which Read More



Fingerprint Evidence

In May 2004, agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation showed up at Brandon Mayfield's law office and arrested him in connection with the March 2004 bombing of a train station in Madrid, Spain. The Oregon lawyer was a suspect because several experts Read More

Packing Fat

In developed parts of the world, from Australia to Europe to the United States, waistlines are bulging. People weigh more than ever before. Even children are joining the ranks of the obese in record numbers, and scientists are concerned. Read More

Scottish Folds

The Scottish Fold is a breed of cat with a natural mutation to its ears. The ear cartilage contains a fold so the ears bend forward and down toward the front of their head. The original Scottish Fold was a long-haired white-haired barn cat. Read More

Seeds of the Future

On an unusual old farm in New York City, workers are stashing away the seeds of the future. In this unlikely place, researchers are putting the seeds from flowering plants and trees in a sleeplike state called suspended animation. Many years from now, ot Read More

Coral Gardens

On their first visit to Davidson Seamount in 2002, scientists realized that they had discovered a very unusual place. What was once an underwater volcano has become home to an unexpectedly diverse community of enormous and colorful sea creatures. Read More

Crows

True crows are large passerine birds in the genus Corvus. All temperate continents (except South America) and several offshore and oceanic islands (including Hawaii) have 40 or so members of this genus. Read More

Earth-Friendly Fabrics

Shopping for clothes involves tricky decisions about fit, color, style, and price. And if a growing number of companies have their way, you'll soon start checking labels for another key detail: environmental impact Read More

Hot Pepper, Hot Spider

Hot peppers and painful spider bites don't seem to have much in common. Both, however, can cause a similar burning sensation. New research now suggests a reason why. A chemical in hot peppers and different ones in spider venom happen to activate the same Read More

Rabbits

The European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a species of rabbit native to southern Europe. Because of its extreme abundance in the Iberian Peninsula, Phoenicians chose the name Spain after it. Read More

Atomic Drive

Trucks, tractors, and bulldozers are impressive machines. They can rip into the earth or carry tons of gear. Large vans line the streets of many neighborhoods in the United States. Meanwhile, everyday automobiles seem to be getting bigger and bigger. A n Read More

Underwater Jungles

Thick forests of brown algae, called kelp, cling to the seafloor in cold waters throughout the world. There are about 100 kinds, including giant kelp, which stretch as high as 30 meters (100 feet). Read More

Sleepless at Sea

Wouldn't it be great to stay up all night without feeling tired the next day? Orca-whale and dolphin babies and moms are champions of sleeplessness. They stay awake for a month after the babies are born—without showing any ill effects. And they don't eve Read More

Fossil Forests

Fossil trees have a story to tell. Earth has been around for about 4.5 billion years. The first traces of life appeared roughly 3.7 billion years ago. Land plants finally emerged more than 3 billion years later. Our immediate human ancestors showed up ju Read More

African Hyenas

Hyenas are carnivores native to Africa and the Indian Subcontinent. They are members of the family Hyaenidae. Read More

Beagles

A Beagle is a medium-sized dog breed and a member of the hound group, similar in appearance to a Foxhound but smaller with shorter legs, and longer, softer ears. Beagles are scent hounds and were used for hunting rabbits to larger hares. Read More

Zooming In on the Wild Sun

When you watch the sun set, it looks like a smooth, orange circle sinking below the horizon. But the sun turns out to be a much wilder place when you take a closer look. Read More

Pronouns

Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. Imagine telling a story about Peter. Your essay may be full of sentences beginning with Peter. In every sentence there will be a Peter. For this purpose, pronouns come very handy. Read More

Miniature Schnauzers

The Miniature Schnauzer is a breed of small dog of the Schnauzer type that originated in Germany in the mid-to-late 19th century. Read More

Slip Sliming Away

Slugs and snails produce slime that looks a lot like the stuff that comes out of your nose. These creatures don't use tissues to wipe up their snot, though. Instead, they use the goo to help them stick to surfaces and crawl over obstacles. Read More

Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze

At first, it may seem like a treat to stay up late—but the next day will be no picnic. There'll be yawning, heavy limbs, and a cranky disposition. At times like these, the desire to sleep can feel overwhelming. And it should. Growing kids need sleep, a Read More

Anacondas

Anacondas are four species of aquatic boa inhabiting the swamps and rivers of the dense forests of tropical South America as well as the southern swamps of the island of Trinidad. The Yellow Anaconda can be found as far south as Argentina. Read More

Songbirds

Listen outside in any season, at almost any time of day, and you'll hear them: songbirds. Although most birds make some kind of noise, songbirds put on a particularly brilliant show, using their voices to produce pleasing whistles, and chirps. Read More

White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks

When you think of things that are white and fuzzy, usually you think of something cute or nice. But a newly discovered fuzzy, white mold may be making bats in the Northeast U.S. sick. Read More

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A Seabird's Endless Summer

A Seabird's Endless Summer

It's that time of year again. Many of the birds that have filled our backyards, parks, and forests with song are packing up and heading south for the winter. For some songbirds, the trip may be as sh... Read More

Roach Love Songs

Roach Love Songs

It's hard to feel romantic around cockroaches, but some male roaches whistle soft music to entice their sweethearts. The whistled sounds are surprisingly complicated and even almost birdlike. The chir... Read More

City Trees Beat Country Trees

City Trees Beat Country Trees

There are city people, and there are country people. Now, the same may be true for trees. A common type of tree grows twice as well in New York City as it does in rural places around the state, resear... Read More

Sweet, Sticky Science

Sweet, Sticky Science

Real maple syrup sweetens even the dullest breakfast, and it's no mystery why. The sticky stuff you pour on your pancakes is at least two-thirds sugar. ... Read More

A Butterfly's Electric Glow

A Butterfly's Electric Glow

The blue-green streaks of a swallowtail butterfly's wings are more than just beautiful. They're also a lesson in physics. Swallowtails that belong to a group called Princeps nireus actually have fluor... Read More

Searching for Alien Life

Searching for Alien Life

On a clear night, go outside, lie on your back, and stare into the sky. As you gaze at the multitude of stars, you might wonder: Is there life on other planets out there? ... Read More

Galaxies far, far, far away

Galaxies far, far, far away

How old are the objects you can see in the sky? The brightest star in the night sky, Sirius, is believed to be about 200-300 million years old. The Sun and Moon are much older—about 4.5 billion years ... Read More

Chaos Among the Planets

Chaos Among the Planets

Once upon a time, many, many years ago, the giant planets in our solar system took different paths around the sun than they follow now. ... Read More

Babies Prove Sound Learners

Babies Prove Sound Learners

It can be hard to know what newborns want. They can't talk, walk, or even point at what they're thinking about. Yet babies begin to develop language skills long before they begin speaking, according ... Read More

Thinner Air, Less Splatter

Thinner Air, Less Splatter

If you could slow down time, you'd be amazed at the things you could see. In slow motion, for example, you could watch individual drops of rain landing in puddles and making mini-splats. ... Read More

Salt secrets

Salt secrets

When you look at your food, some ingredients are easy to see. For example, there is obviously milk in your cereal, cheese on your pizza and peanut butter on your toast. But your meals are also filled... Read More

Charged cars that would charge

Charged cars that would charge

In the middle of February, Tom Gage drove his car right into a building in downtown San Diego. Gage didn’t crash his car; he was showing it off — to a crowd gathered at the annual meeting of the Ameri... Read More

Asiatic Bears

Asiatic Bears

The Asiatic Black bear (Ursus thibetanus or Selenarctos thibetanus), also known as the Tibetan black bear, the Himalayan black bear, or the moon bear, is a medium sized, sharp-clawed, black-coloured b... Read More

Caimans

Caimans

Although the Caiman has not been studied in-depth, it has been discovered that their mating cycles are linked to the rainfall cycles and the river levels in order to increase their offspring's chances... Read More

The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes

The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes By Michael Sizer

Make time for nursery rhymes and read about the surprising benefits of rhyming.... Read More









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