Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Watching out for vultures
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Newts
Animals
A Sense of Danger
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Baboons Listen for Who's Tops
Behavior
Babies Prove Sound Learners
Brainy bees know two from three
When Darwin got sick of feathers
Birds
Flamingos
Cranes
Macaws
Chemistry and Materials
The metal detector in your mouth
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Sugary Survival Skill
Computers
The Book of Life
Lighting goes digital
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
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Earth
Rocking the House
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Weird, new ant
Environment
Food Web Woes
Ready, unplug, drive
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Flounder
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Chocolate Rules
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
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GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Deep-space dancers
Math Naturals
Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Heart Revival
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Corals
Bedbugs
Tapeworms
Mammals
Oxen
Elephants
Minks
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Surprise Visitor
The algae invasion
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Anacondas
Gila Monsters
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Mercury's magnetic twisters
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Flying the Hyper Skies
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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CoyotesCoyotes - Coyotes

Coyotes

The coyote (Canis latrans, meaning "barking dog", also prairie wolf) is a member of the Canidae (dog) family and a relative of the domestic dog. Coyotes are native to North America and are only found in North America south to Costa Rica. Read More



Acid Snails

Factories, cars, and other machines spit out lots of a gas called carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is known as a greenhouse gas because it traps heat in the atmosphere. More and more of the gas has been accumulating in the air in recent years. Read More

Hints of Life in Ancient Lava

When you hear the word "lava," your first thought might be of volcanoes violently spewing molten rock. Lava is full of surprises, though. Scientists now say they have found old lava that contains some of the earliest traces of life on Earth. Read More

Bison

Perhaps no other animal symbolizes the West as dramatically as the American bison. In prehistoric times millions of these animals roamed the North American Continent from the Great Slave Lake in northern Canada, south into Mexico. Read More

Surviving Olympic Heat

It's going to be hot over there. At this summer's Olympic Games in Athens, temperatures will soar into the 90s. The air will be humid, sticky, and laden with pollution. It'll be hard to breathe, hard to stay cool, hard to keep hydrated. Read More

Catching a Comet's Tail

It's been a bumpy ride for the spacecraft known as Stardust. On Jan. 2, the NASA craft got within 240 kilometers of the core of a comet known as Wild 2 (pronounced Vilt 2). The region around the comet's core is a blizzard of dust and debris. Read More

Weaving with Light

In the rugged Sierra Madre mountain range of west central Mexico, the native Huichol people live much the way their ancestors did—without electricity. Read More

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

In English grammar, words that refer to people, places, or things are called nouns. They can be classified in many ways. One way to classify nouns is according to whether they can be counted or not. Many English mistakes are related to this point. Read More

Moon Crash, Splash

There are many ways to study the moon: Look through a telescope, measure its movement across the sky, or watch for mountains (with special sunglasses) as it passes across the sun during an eclipse, for example. But here’s one way that’s a little unusual: Read More

A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales

In 1989, an oil tanker called the Exxon Valdez struck an underwater reef in Prince William Sound, a large body of water in southern Alaska. The ship dumped about 11 million gallons of crude oil into the freezing water, creating the largest spill in U.S. h Read More

Making light of sleep

Maybe this has happened to you: In the middle of class, while you pretended to be paying attention to the teacher’s lecture, your eyelids started to droop. You began having second thoughts about staying up late on Facebook the night before. Don’t be too Read More

When Darwin got sick of feathers

The great biologist Charles Darwin wrote to another scientist in 1860 that looking at a peacock feather made him sick. OK, he was halfway joking (you can tell from the rest of the letter). But still, you might wonder what was wrong with the man. He live Read More

Drilling Deep for Fuel

Digging in dirt and rock is a big business. Oil and gas lie beneath Earth's surface in certain places, and these reservoirs are the planet's main sources of fuel. Until now, all the digging has happened only in Earth's outer layer, called the crust. Oil Read More

The Color of Health

Nature is full of color, from rainbows and roses to butterfly wings and peacock tails. Even the fruits and vegetables you eat often have distinctive colors: intensely blue blueberries, deeply red strawberries, and richly green broccoli. Read More

Pigeons

The large bird genus Columba comprises a group of medium to large stout-bodied pigeons, often referred to as the typical pigeons. As with other genera in the family, the terms dove and pigeon are used interchangeably. Read More

German Shepherds

The German Shepherd Dog (or Alsatian) is a breed of dog. Because they are eager to please, they are easily trained in obedience and protection. German Shepherd Dogs are often used as working dogs in many capacities. Read More

Mollusks

Although mollusks are probably best known for their unique shells, the word itself actually comes from he Latin word for "soft." Many types of mollusks are raised and captured for food and some people consider eating snails a true delicacy. Read More

Marsupials

Marsupials are identified by one very important characteristic: they carry and nurse their young in a pouch. Marsupial babies are born blind and helpless, with no hair and with small forearms that are barely developed. Read More

The science of disappearing

For inspiration, you could hit the books: In Greek mythology, the goddess Athena wore an invisibility cap during the Trojan War. The same cap helped the half-god Perseus, who wore it to hide from Medusa, a monster who could turn someone to stone just by l Read More

Cockroaches

Among the most well-known species are the American cockroach, which is about 3 cm long, and the German cockroach, about 1.5 cm long. Tropical cockroaches are often much bigger. When infesting buildings, cockroaches are considered pests. Read More

Anacondas

Anacondas are four species of aquatic boa inhabiting the swamps and rivers of the dense forests of tropical South America as well as the southern swamps of the island of Trinidad. The Yellow Anaconda can be found as far south as Argentina. Read More

Oldest Writing in the New World

You don't normally expect anything exciting to happen while building a road. But, several years ago, road builders in southern Mexico found a large stone slab covered with marks. Read More

Elephant Mimics

It's time to revise the old saying, "Monkey see, monkey do." According to new research, you could also say, "Elephant hear, elephant do." Read More

Chimpanzees

The chimpanzee is the common name for the two living species in the genus Pan: The common Chimpanzee and The Bonobo. Pan troglodytes, the Common Chimpanzee, lives in West and Central Africa. Read More

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The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs

The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs

A new twist in an old story about dinosaur bones sounds like a fairy tale for fossil fans: Once upon a time, scientists discovered three different dinosaur skulls in the northern United States. The fi... Read More

Microbes at the Gas Pump

Microbes at the Gas Pump

Scientists searching for an Earth-friendly alternative to gasoline are looking in some of the weirdest places—termite guts, cow stomachs, and rotting logs. These researchers are hunting for bacteria a... Read More

Primates

Primates

Primates make up a small but diverse number of species, including human beings. Primates have hands or paws that are able to grasp items, fingernails instead of claws, and eyes that face forward (inst... Read More

Siamese Cats

Siamese Cats

The Siamese is one of the first distinctly recognized breeds of Oriental cat. The exact origins of the breed are unknown, but it is believed to be from Southeast Asia, and is said to be descended from... Read More

Walking Sticks

Walking Sticks

Phasmids (or Walking Sticks as they are commonly called) are one of the most remarkable orders of insects. They are typically either stick-like or leaf-like; camouflage or mimicry being their defining... Read More

Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom

Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom

Sparkling blue flashes. "Ooh!" Cascading streaks of red light. "Aah!" Sizzling green explosions. "Wow!" For many people in the United States, the Fourth of July means on... Read More

Leeches

Leeches

Leeches are annelids comprising the subclass Hirudinea. There are freshwater, terrestrial and marine leeches. Like earthworms, leeches are hermaphrodites. All leech species are carnivorous and have ev... Read More

African Ostrich

African Ostrich

The ostrich (Struthio camelus) is a flightless bird native to Africa. It is the only living species of its family, Struthionidae, and its genus, Struthio. ... Read More

Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud

Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud By Pam Allyn

Raise a lifelong lover of books with these tips for reading aloud.... Read More

Geckos

Geckos

Geckos are small to moderately large lizards belonging to the family Gekkonidae and found in warm climates throughout the world. Geckos are unique among lizards in their vocalizations, making chirpin... Read More

Peafowl

Peafowl

The term peafowl can refer to any of three species of bird in the genera Pavo and Afropavo of the pheasant family, Phasianidae. They are most notable for the male's extravagant tail, which it displays... Read More

The chemistry of sleeplessness

The chemistry of sleeplessness

When the school year starts, it can be tough to switch from lazy summer mornings to the blaring buzz of an alarm clock. After a few early mornings, extreme fatigue might make you feel like you’re goin... Read More

Ancient Heights

Ancient Heights

You probably know where all the hills are in your neighborhood. Even so, the planet hasn't always had the same lumps. In some places, Earth was even lumpier that it is now. In other places, it was smo... Read More

Dragonflies

Dragonflies

Dragonflies typically eat mosquitoes, midges and other small insects like flies, bees, and butterflies. They are usually found around lakes, ponds, streams, and wetlands because their larvae, known as... Read More

Tapeworms and Drug Delivery

Tapeworms and Drug Delivery

It's not easy living inside an intestine. But some creatures are happiest in the warm and juicy confines of other animals' digestive systems. A tapeworm called Hymenolepis diminuta, for instance, can ... Read More









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