Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Toads
Animals
Armadillo
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Behavior
Making light of sleep
Dino-bite!
Puberty gone wild
Birds
Songbirds
Peafowl
A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
The newest superheavy in town
Computers
Music of the Future
New eyes to scan the skies
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Plastic-munching microbes
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
Catching Some Rays
Island Extinctions
Snow Traps
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Watching deep-space fireworks
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Basking Sharks
Perches
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Building a Food Pyramid
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
It's a Math World for Animals
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Flu Patrol
Invertebrates
Scallops
Tarantula
Tapeworms
Mammals
Primates
Orangutans
Sun Bear
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
IceCube Science
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Fungus Hunt
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Anacondas
Garter Snakes
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Charged cars that would charge
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Watering the Air
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
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Brainy bees know two from three Brainy bees know two from three - Brainy bees know two from three

Brainy bees know two from three

One, two, three…. That’s how high you could count if you were a bee. A new study found that honeybees can recognize a pattern based only on the number of elements in it. If the bees learn to recognize three blue dots, then later they can find three yello Read More



The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot

In at least one place, the land at the bottom of the ocean is nearly naked, scientists have discovered. The rocks that form Earth's surface beneath the oceans are usually covered with a thick layer made up of sand or dirt and the skeletons of tiny ocean c Read More

Remembering Facts and Feelings

Can you describe everything you did last weekend, but you can't remember a thing from last year's social studies class? The difference may be all in your head. Read More

Black Holes That Burp

It wouldn’t be very pleasant to go near a black hole. Armed with an enormous amount of gravitational pull, the incredibly tiny but supermassive object would swallow you alive and stretch you into a piece of spaghetti in the process. Read More

Mini T. rex

Among dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus rex may be the most familiar. At 20 feet tall and twice that long from snout to tail, this beast was no doubt a scary sight to any smaller animals that crossed its path. It had a large head, strong legs and tiny arms, and T. Read More

Losing with Heads or Tails

Heads, you win. Tails, you lose. It turns out that coin tosses may be less fair than you might think. A new mathematical analysis even suggests a way to increase your chances of winning. Read More

Toy Challenge

You probably have a favorite game that you just can't wait to play. Your friends might have their own ideas about what's fun and what's not. Have you ever thought about joining forces and creating a game that everyone would love? Read More

Seagulls

Gulls are seabirds in the family Laridae. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae), and more distantly to the waders, auks and skimmers. Most gulls belong to the large genus Larus. Read More

Wildcats

The wildcat Felis silvestris, sometimes "wildcat" or "wild-cat" especially when distinguishing from other wild species of felines, is a small predator native to Europe, the western part of Asia, and Africa. Read More

The newest superheavy in town

Scientists around the world are on a quest to find all the elements possible in the universe. Everything is made of elements, so understanding elements is a way of understanding all the matter around us. Some of these elements, hydrogen or oxygen for exam Read More

Roundworms

Roundworms are triploblastic protostomes with a complete digestive system. Roundworms have no circulatory or respiratory systems so they use diffusion to breathe and for circulation of substances around their body. Read More

Saving Wetlands

There's water, and there's land. Somewhere in the middle, there are wetlands. Not totally flooded by water, but not completely dry either, these in-between places rank among the richest ecosystems on Earth. Read More

Robins

The American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. The American Robin is 25-28 cm (10-11 in) long. It has gray upperparts and head, and orange underparts, usually brighter in the male. Read More

Supersuits for Superheroes

Just by getting dressed in the morning, you could jump 10 feet into the air, carry 150 pounds without getting tired, and throw a baseball faster than Roger Clemens. Read More

Walrus

Walruses are members of the order Carnivora and suborder (or alternatively superfamily) Pinnipedia. They are the only members in the family Odobenidae. Read More

African Hippopotamus

The Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius also known as river-horse) is a large, plant-eating African mammal, one of only two extant, and three or four recently extinct, species in the family Hippopotamidae. Read More

Pronouns

Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. Imagine telling a story about Peter. Your essay may be full of sentences beginning with Peter. In every sentence there will be a Peter. For this purpose, pronouns come very handy. Read More

Secrets of an Ancient Computer

Computers go back farther in history than you might imagine. A mysterious mechanism found in a 2,000-year-old Greek shipwreck may have been used to calculate the positions of planets, predict when eclipses were to occur, and do other astronomical chores. Read More

Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections

Sports are fun, but they can also be dangerous. Broken bones, pulled muscles, and sprained joints are all common injuries among athletes. Now, researchers have identified another possible risk of playing certain sports. Read More

Arachnids

Arachnids are invertebrate (spineless) animals that have an exoskeleton, a body divided into two parts, and eight jointed legs (whereas insects have only six.) Also unlike insects, arachnids have no antennae or wings. Read More

Kookaburras

Kookaburras are very large, terrestrial kingfishers native to Australia and New Guinea. Some were introduced into New Zealand between 1866 and 1880, but only those saved on Kawau Island by Sir George Grey survived. Read More

Humans

Humans, or human beings, are bipedal primates belonging to the mammalian species Homo sapiens (Latin for "wise man" or "knowing man") under the family Hominidae (the great apes). Like most primates, humans are by nature social. Read More

Earth-Friendly Fabrics

Shopping for clothes involves tricky decisions about fit, color, style, and price. And if a growing number of companies have their way, you'll soon start checking labels for another key detail: environmental impact Read More

Charged cars that would charge

In the middle of February, Tom Gage drove his car right into a building in downtown San Diego. Gage didn’t crash his car; he was showing it off — to a crowd gathered at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Read More

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The hungry blob at the edge of the universe

The hungry blob at the edge of the universe

Using a telescope atop a Hawaiian mountain, astronomers recently caught sight of an enormous, newfound glowing object in deep, deep space. If you were an astronomer, what would you call such a thing?... Read More

Bandicoot

Bandicoot

A bandicoot is any of about 20 species of small to medium-sized, terrestrial marsupial omnivores in the order Peramelemorphia. The word bandicoot is an anglicised form of the Telugu word pandhi-kokku.... Read More

Carnivorous Birds

Carnivorous Birds

The ducks paddling around and scooping up breadcrumbs are harmless enough, but not all birds are so docile. Carnivorous birds -- often called raptors -- make up a large portion of all bird species. ... Read More

Navigating by the Light of the Moon

Navigating by the Light of the Moon

Moonlight inspires poetry, love songs, and, it seems, even dung beetles. Nighttime experiments have shown that dung beetles use a property of moonlight known as polarization to keep themselves moving... Read More

Surf Watch

Surf Watch

I usually hate getting up early. But during a recent surfing trip to Mexico, I was up with the sun. I couldn't wait to get to the beach. Even so, I didn't plunge into the water right away. I watched ... Read More

An Ancient Feathered Biplane

An Ancient Feathered Biplane

When the Wright Brothers lifted off at Kitty Hawk in 1903, they flew a plane with two sets of wings, one below the other. Their feat went down in history as the first successful flight by a heavier-th... Read More

Stunts for High-Diving Ants

Stunts for High-Diving Ants

Make way for a new kind of stunt-creature: ants. Some tree-dwelling ants that live in the tropics can twist themselves in the air to change the direction of their tumbles when they fall. They end up ... Read More

Weaving with Light

Weaving with Light

In the rugged Sierra Madre mountain range of west central Mexico, the native Huichol people live much the way their ancestors did—without electricity. ... Read More

Rover Makes Splash on Mars

Rover Makes Splash on Mars

A robot on Mars has just turned up the best evidence yet that liquid water once flowed on the Red Planet. Because water is thought to be necessary for life, the discovery should help researchers pinpo... Read More

Poison Dart Frogs

Poison Dart Frogs

The poison dart frog, poison arrow frog, dart frog or poison frog, is the common name given to the group of frogs belonging to the family Dendrobatidae. Poison dart frogs are native to two geographica... Read More

Island Extinctions

Island Extinctions

People arrived in Australia about 50,000 years ago. Soon after, many of the island's large mammals disappeared, new evidence suggests.Among the animals that went extinct were several species of kangar... Read More

Tortoises

Tortoises

A tortoise is a land-dwelling reptile of the order Testudines.Just the Facts: Like its aquatic cousins, the turtle and the terrapin, the tortoise is shielded from predators by a shell. Most land torto... Read More

Fingerprinting Fossils

Fingerprinting Fossils

A bone is a bone is a bone. Or so it seems. To an untrained eye, a fossilized bone doesn't tell much of a story. Scientists, on the other hand, can date a fossil with amazing precision. They can also... Read More

Eels

Eels

True eels are fish of the order Anguilliformes, which consists of 4 suborders, 19 families, 110 genera and 400 species. Most eels are predators. Depending on their species, eels can reach from 10 cm t... Read More

A Vulture's Hidden Enemy

A Vulture's Hidden Enemy

Vultures are scavengers, feeding on the meat from whatever dead animals they can find. But in Pakistan and India, vultures that have been feeding on dead farm animals, such as cattle, have been dying ... Read More









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