Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Toads
Animals
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Little Bee Brains That Could
Hearing Whales
Behavior
Puberty gone wild
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Birds
Quails
Geese
Cardinals
Chemistry and Materials
Picture the Smell
Batteries built by Viruses
Moon Crash, Splash
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Galaxies far, far, far away
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Flower family knows its roots
Earth's Poles in Peril
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Environment
Catching Some Rays
The Birds are Falling
Shrinking Fish
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Oldest Writing in the New World
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
Bass
Electric Catfish
Electric Eel
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Yummy bugs
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Monkeys Count
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Foul Play?
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Cockroaches
Invertebrates
Starfish
Mammals
Numbats
Cocker Spaniels
Cape Buffalo
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
The Particle Zoo
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Fungus Hunt
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Snapping Turtles
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Cousin Earth
Planning for Mars
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Ready, unplug, drive
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Dire Shortage of Water
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Sugar Power for Cell Phones Sugar Power for Cell Phones - Sugar Power for Cell Phones

Sugar Power for Cell Phones

Drinking sugary soda gives you a burst of energy. Some day, sugar might power electronic equipment as well. That's because scientists have now found a way to turn sugar into electricity. Read More



Squid

Squids are the large, diverse group of marine cephalopods popular as food in cuisines as widely separated as Korean and Italian. In fish markets and restaurants in English-speaking countries, it is often known by the name calamari. Read More

Walking Sticks

Phasmids (or Walking Sticks as they are commonly called) are one of the most remarkable orders of insects. They are typically either stick-like or leaf-like; camouflage or mimicry being their defining characteristic. Read More

Koalas, Up Close and Personal

Koalas are, hands down, the cutest animals I've ever seen in the wild. With fluffy fur, pudgy bodies, round eyes, and wisps of spiky hair sprouting from behind their ears, koalas look like teddy bears with attitude. Every time I saw a koala during my rec Read More

Spotty Survival

Northern spotted owls live in the western parts of northern California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. They roost in stands of trees that are hundreds of years old. Read More

Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater

Mermaids probably don't exist. But there are children of certain tribes in Asia who are distinctly fishlike. Read More

Shrinking Fish

You've probably heard the story about "the big one that got away." Someone goes out fishing and claims to have caught a monster fish. There's no proof, though, because the fish managed to free itself before it could be landed. Read More

Seeing red means danger ahead

The color red often means danger — and by paying attention, accidents can be prevented. At railroad crossings, flashing red lights warn cars to stay back. A red light at a traffic intersection tells cars to stop, so they don’t run into other cars. And whe Read More

Writing on eggshells

From graffiti to wallpaper to the geometric shapes used to decorate buildings, people have been making designs out of patterns for a long time. Designs can be just for looks, or they can be used to communicate a message. Read More

What is a Preposition?

A preposition links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence. The word or phrase that the preposition introduces is called the object of the preposition. A preposition usually indicates the temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its Read More

Drawing Energy out of Wastewater

Flush. Every time you go to the toilet, your waste gets carried away by water. Before it can be released into the environment, the wastewater has to be treated to remove solids and other contaminants. Read More

Lice

A louse egg is commonly called a nit. Lice attach their eggs to their host's hair with specialized saliva which results in a bond that is very difficult to separate without specialized products. Read More

Ancient Art on the Rocks

Whenever you sketch pictures in the dirt or draw stick figures on a chalkboard, you join a long line of artists from throughout human history. For thousands of years, people have been leaving their marks on rock walls and in caves around the world. Read More

The Pressure of Scuba Diving

At 25 feet below the surface of the water, Alex Whitaker's tooth started to ache. When he tried to dive deeper, the pain grew worse. Read More

Saving Wetlands

There's water, and there's land. Somewhere in the middle, there are wetlands. Not totally flooded by water, but not completely dry either, these in-between places rank among the richest ecosystems on Earth. Read More

Silk’s superpowers

Spider-Man isn’t the only person with an interest in spider silk. While Spidey uses the threads to zigzag from building to building, or to snare a bad guy, scientists are investigating silk for different reasons. And though researchers have learned a lot Read More

Chicken of the Sea

These days, it’s easy to fly across oceans for vacation. Centuries ago, however, crossing the open seas required planning, handmade boats, and courage. Read More

Reptiles

Many reptiles are have earned a reputation for being slow, but some can move extremely fast when threatened, or catching prey. Due to their cold blood, they must seek out sources of warmth (like a warm rock) to help balance their body temperature Read More

The Birds are Falling

It's time to start paying close attention to birds. That's what a group of scientists and students from Stanford University in California says. Read More

Electronic Paper Turns a Page

Reading and computer screens don't go together very well. If you've ever tried to do lots of online research for a school report, stayed up late playing computer games, or gone on an instant-messaging marathon with some friends, you probably know what I Read More

A Rainforest Trapped in Amber

A group of paleontologists has found gold in the western Amazon. No, not the type of gold that's made into jewelry or coins. Instead, the fossil-hunting scientists discovered ancient, gold-colored rocks that have tiny plants and insects trapped inside. T Read More

Treating peanut allergy bit by bit

Peanut allergies are among the most common and most dangerous food allergies. A tiny exposure to peanuts can mean big trouble for a person with a peanut allergy, with symptoms ranging from sneezing or coughing to the constriction, or narrowing, of airways Read More

How to Slice a Cake Fairly

Sharing can be hard. Every kid knows that, and mathematicians do, too. So mathematicians have spent a lot of time thinking about how to make sharing easier. Read More

Hares

Hares and jackrabbits are leporids belonging to the genus Lepus. Very young hares are called leverets. Hares live solitarily or in pairs. A common type of hare in arctic North America is the Snowshoe Hare. Read More

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Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds are small birds in the family Trochilidae. They are known for their ability to hover in mid-air by rapidly flapping their wings, 15 to 80 times per second (depending on the size of the bi... Read More

Awake at Night

Awake at Night

The less sleep I get, the unhappier I become. When I'm really tired, I have trouble concentrating. I can't get any work done. I get cranky and irritable, and everything starts to annoy me. I know lot... Read More

Setting a Prime Number Record

Setting a Prime Number Record

What's the biggest number you can think of? A billion? A trillion? A googol? (That's 1 followed by 100 zeroes.) Whatever number you come up with, there's always a larger one.... Read More

Getting the dirt on carbon

Getting the dirt on carbon

Each year, spring comes, plants bloom and the trees leaf out in their full green glory. Come fall, while diving into piles of fallen leaves, you may think the life cycle of the leaf has come to an end... Read More

Octopuses

Octopuses

The octopus is a cephalopod of the order Octopoda that inhabits many diverse regions of the ocean, especially coral reefs. The term may also refer to only those creatures in the genus Octopus.... Read More

Settling the Americas

Settling the Americas

The world was a very different place tens of thousands of years ago. People didn't yet inhabit many regions that are crowded today.... Read More

Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths

Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths

People have been fascinated by woolly mammoths for a long time. Before people even knew how to grow crops or make things from metal, they were decorating their walls with pictures of mammoths. Scienti... Read More

Snakes

Snakes

Although often described as "slimey", snakes are actually anything but. Like all reptiles their bodies are very dry, but the shine of their unique scales makes it appear as if their skin has... Read More

These gems make their own way

These gems make their own way

Tom Chatham’s desk is littered with gemstones. Rubies, sapphires, and emeralds are scattered like pieces of candy. Some of them are as big as golf balls. We’re sitting on the seventh floor of a build... Read More

Sugar-pill medicine

Sugar-pill medicine

Feeling sick? You wouldn’t want to take fake medicine for an earache or major illness. But in some cases, the fake stuff can help. Studies have long shown that fake medicines, or placebos, can produc... Read More

Forests as a Tsunami Shield

Forests as a Tsunami Shield

It's been a banner year for natural disasters. Tsunamis and hurricanes, in particular, have battered homes, destroyed cities, and taken thousands of lives. Areas along the oceans have been slammed esp... Read More

If Only Bones Could Speak

If Only Bones Could Speak

Language is one trait that separates people from other animals. Words give us the power to communicate complicated ideas, and this skill has taken us far. ... Read More

Rattlesnakes

Rattlesnakes

Rattlesnakes are a group of venomous New World snakes, genera Crotalus and Sistrurus. They belong to the class of venomous snakes known commonly as pit vipers. There are nearly thirty species of rattl... Read More

Slip-sliding away

Slip-sliding away

Spin around quickly for a long period of time, and you’re likely to lose your balance and fall. Strangely, a similar thing can occur with orbiting bodies such as a planet. ... Read More

Dogs

Dogs

One of the first animals domesticated by ancient man, the dog has long been accurately described as "man's best friend." ... Read More









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