Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
A Sense of Danger
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Behavior
Talking with Hands
Fish needs see-through head
Supersonic Splash
Birds
Peafowl
Songbirds
Eagles
Chemistry and Materials
The hottest soup in New York
Earth from the inside out
Lighting goes digital
Computers
Lighting goes digital
The Shape of the Internet
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
Hall of Dinos
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Island of Hope
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Environment
Little Bits of Trouble
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Whale Watch
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
An Ancient Childhood
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Nurse Sharks
Flashlight Fishes
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
Packing Fat
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Losing with Heads or Tails
Math Naturals
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Lice
Lobsters
Mammals
Elk
Mule
Platypus
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Speedy stars
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Flower family knows its roots
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Anacondas
Snakes
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Slip-sliding away
Ready, Set, Supernova
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Riding Sunlight
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
How to Fly Like a Bat
Reach for the Sky
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Where rivers run uphill
Arctic Melt
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Healing HoneyHealing Honey - Healing Honey

Healing Honey

Coughs, sniffles, sneezes, runny noses: Colds and other nasty lung infections are especially common in winter. To fight the misery, many people swallow syrups and pills that claim to clear stuffy noses, soothe sore throats, stifle coughs, etc. Read More



Hot Pepper, Hot Spider

Hot peppers and painful spider bites don't seem to have much in common. Both, however, can cause a similar burning sensation. New research now suggests a reason why. A chemical in hot peppers and different ones in spider venom happen to activate the same Read More

Spinach Power for Solar Cells

Popeye uses spinach to power his muscles. Now, scientists are looking to spinach as a power source for supplying electricity. A solar cell converts sunlight into electricity. Read More

Feathered Fossils

As dinosaurs go, Velociraptor mongoliensis is fairly famous. Three starred in the 1993 film Jurassic Park. Despite the creature's fame, scientists have found remains from only about 20 velociraptors. Most of those discoveries turned up in the last 15 yea Read More

Listening to Birdsong

A zebra finch chirps away to himself. Suddenly he notices a female bird nearby. He realizes he has an audience and immediately changes his song. Can the female tell the difference in his performance? According to a new study, the female zebra finch knows Read More

A New Look at Saturn's rings

Many students know that to figure out the age of a tree, you count the number of rings that make up its trunk, one ring for each year. But what if you wanted to know the age of the rings that surround the planet Saturn? It's a tricky question that scient Read More

Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine

We hear a lot these days about how air pollution is changing temperatures on Earth. New evidence from a mountaintop in China now suggests that pollution can also change the amount of rain and snow that fall in some places. Read More

Longer lives for wild elephants

Most people think of zoos as safe havens for animals, where struggles such as difficulty finding food and avoiding predators don’t exist. Without such problems, animals in zoos should live to a ripe old age. But that may not be true for the largest land Read More

The bug that may have killed a dinosaur

Sue is a famous Tyrannosaurus rex whose skeleton lives in the Field Museum in Chicago. Small, smooth holes in Sue’s jawbones have been a scientific mystery for years, and scientists want to know how they formed. Some researchers have believed, for example Read More

Crocodilians

Alligators and Crocodiles are considered holdovers from the age of dinosaurs. These reptiles spend their entire lives in and around the water, using it for hunting and even the raising of offspring. They are similar in appearance to one another. Read More

Mosquito duets

A mosquito’s whining buzz can be as irritating as its bite. But to a mosquito of the opposite sex, the high-pitched hum is the sound of romance. Skeeters create their distinctive sound by beating their wings at a certain rate, or a certain number of beat Read More

Great White Shark

Great Whites have a sixth sense given by the Ampullae of Lorenzini, which enables them to detect the electromagnetic field emitted by the movement of living animals. A Great White's sense of sight is useful, but the shark does not depend on it. Read More

IceCube Science

Francis Halzen has an unusual job. This scientist studies itsy bitsy, teeny tiny objects zipping through the universe. They’re called neutrinos. Read More

Results of GSAT are in schools this week By Teach It To Kids GSAT Jamaica

Education Minister Ronald Thwaites said while the average scores in the various subjects written in this year sitting of the Grade Six Achievement Test – GSAT - have improved over the last six years, the levels were not satisfactory. Read More

Cockroaches

Among the most well-known species are the American cockroach, which is about 3 cm long, and the German cockroach, about 1.5 cm long. Tropical cockroaches are often much bigger. When infesting buildings, cockroaches are considered pests. Read More

Poodles

The Poodle is a breed of dog; specifically, it is a gun dog noted for its ability in the water and bird hunting skills. The English name comes from the German Pudel, or Pudelhund – from Old German puddeln, meaning "to splash about". Read More

Detecting True Art

Real or fake? In the world of art, that can be an expensive question. Famous paintings by classic artists can sell for millions of dollars. To make a quick buck, people sometimes try to sell paintings that are imitations of the real thing. Read More

African Warthogs

The warthog is a wild member of the pig family that lives in Africa. They are the only widely recognised species in their genus, though some authors divide them into two species. Read More

Snails

The name snail applies to most members of the molluscan class Gastropoda that have coiled shells .These snails are of herbivorous nature. Snails move like earthworms by alternating body contractions with stretching. Read More

Pugs

A Pug is a toy dog breed of dog with a wrinkly face, medium-small body. The word "Pug" may have derived from the Latin pugnus (fist). Or, in nod to the breeds sometimes mischievous nature, from the character "Puck" of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Read More

Beavers

Beavers are semi-aquatic rodents native to North America and Europe. They are the only living members of the family Castoridae, which contains a single genus, Castor. Beavers are the second largest rodents, after the capybara. Read More

Math Naturals

t's probably an exaggeration to say that kids are natural math geniuses. But kindergartners can solve math problems with large numbers long before they officially learn how to add and subtract. By using their instincts to estimate values, researchers repo Read More

Whales

Gentle giants of the open oceans, whales are among the earth's oldest and largest creatures. Living in a watery world so far removed from our own, our understanding of whales is still advancing, and mysteries still surrounding their behavior. Read More

Wrong-way planets do gymnastics

Cartwheels aren’t just for gymnasts anymore — a gang of distant, unusual planets, a team of astronomers say, may have done giant, deep-space cartwheels to get into place. Read More

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The Rise of Yellowstone

The Rise of Yellowstone

Yellowstone National Park is an active place—both above ground and underneath it. The park contains more than 10,000 geysers, hot springs, and steaming volcanic vents. Underground heat fuels this geo... Read More

An Ocean View's Downside

An Ocean View's Downside

Going to the beach, swimming in the ocean, and surfing or just watching the waves are part of many vacations. For the increasing number of people who move to coastal areas, such activities become part... Read More

Math of the World

Math of the World

If you know where to look, you can find math anywhere you go. Math is not just in the numbers on a cash register or at a football game. ... Read More

Fast-flying fungal spores

Fast-flying fungal spores

Life's not easy for fungi that live on piles of animal waste, or dung. For starters, well, they're living in dung. And to complete their life cycle, fungi release cells called spores that must be eate... Read More

Copycat Monkeys

Copycat Monkeys

Imitation can be annoying—like when your little brother or sister repeats everything you say. It can also be fun—like during a game of follow-the-leader. Imitation is also an important way for babies... Read More

The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming

The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming

On October 7, 2008, an asteroid the size of a car blazed through the atmosphere and crashed into the Nubian Desert in the African nation of Sudan. Eyewitnesses who were looking up at the sky at the ti... Read More

Yaks

Yaks

The yak (Bos grunniens) is a long-haired humped domestic bovine found in Tibet and throughout the Himalayan region of south central Asia, as well as in Mongolia. In Tibetan, the word yak refers only t... Read More

Crawfish

Crawfish

Crayfish, sometimes called crawfish, or crawdads are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. They are found in bodies of fresh water that do not freeze to ... Read More

Snakes

Snakes

Although often described as "slimey", snakes are actually anything but. Like all reptiles their bodies are very dry, but the shine of their unique scales makes it appear as if their skin has... Read More

Basking Sharks

Basking Sharks

The Basking Shark (Cetorhinus maximus), also known as the Bone Shark, is the second largest fish alive, after the Whale Shark. A cosmopolitan species, Basking Sharks are found in all the world's tempe... Read More

Flu river

Flu river

What if the solution to one problem causes other problems down the road? That may be the case in the ongoing struggle to fight the flu. Flu season is almost here, which means more and more people may ... Read More

Gray Whale

Gray Whale

The Gray whale or Grey whale , more recently called the Eastern Pacific Gray whale, is a whale that travels between feeding and breeding grounds yearly. Gray whales were once called devil fish because... Read More

Popping to Perfection

Popping to Perfection

You're at the movies. The feature's starting. You've got a soda in one hand and a bucket of popcorn in the other. Just as the opening scene begins to suck you in, you crunch down on a mouthful of popc... Read More

Weasels and Kin

Weasels and Kin

Although rodent-like in appearance, weasels and similar animals (such as minks and polecats) are in their own genus of mammals, called "mustelids." ... Read More

Einstein's Skateboard

Einstein's Skateboard

Albert Einstein never rode a skateboard. However, skateboarders caught big air on a halfpipe in honor of the famous physicist. ... Read More









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