Agriculture
Watering the Air
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Animals
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Revenge of the Cowbirds
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Behavior
Making light of sleep
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Eating Troubles
Birds
Robins
Kookaburras
Woodpecker
Chemistry and Materials
Graphene's superstrength
Revving Up Green Machines
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Play for Science
The Book of Life
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Island of Hope
Coral Gardens
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Environment
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
Fakes in the museum
Sahara Cemetery
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Fish
Freshwater Fish
Manta Rays
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Chew for Health
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
Prime Time for Cicadas
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
Dust Mites
Flatworms
Mammals
Little Brown Bats
Antelope
Cape Buffalo
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Children and Media
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Invisibility Ring
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Sweet, Sticky Science
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Pythons
Cobras
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Sounds of Titan
A Smashing Display
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
Smart Windows
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Recipe for a Hurricane
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The Shape of the Internet The Shape of the Internet - The Shape of the Internet

The Shape of the Internet

The Internet is really good at connecting people, and Science News for Kids is a perfect example. I live in Minneapolis. My editors work in Chicago and Washington, D.C. And you can look at this Web site on computers all over the world. It seems so simple Read More



Listen and Learn

f you want to learn anything at school, you need to listen to your teachers. Unfortunately, millions of kids can't hear what their teachers are saying. And it's not because these students are goofing off. Often, it's the room's fault. Faulty architecture Read More

Eating Troubles

We all have to eat, but choosing the right foods can be hard. Many people also have trouble controlling how much they eat. Instead of eating reasonable portions of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and other healthy foods, lots of people eat too many cook Read More

The memory of a material

Nafion is a useful material that has been around since the 1960s, but don’t be surprised if you’ve never heard of it. It was first made by a chemist at DuPont, a company that makes chemicals, and it is a common ingredient in fuel cells. (Fuel cells, which Read More

Butterflies

A butterfly is a flying insect of the order Lepidoptera. Many butterflies have striking colours and patterns on their wings. When touched by humans, they tend to lose some scales, that look like a fine powder. Read More

Fastest Plant on Earth

Move over, Venus flytrap. Now, there's something faster. Using a high-speed camera, researchers have documented what may be the quickest-acting plant ever seen: the bunchberry dogwood slinging pollen into the air. Read More

A Dead Star's Dusty Ring

In 5 billion years, the sun will swell into a huge ball that will fry Earth or even swallow it up. Our star's outer layers will then fly off, and its core will shrink into a dense, fading object called a white dwarf. Read More

The algae invasion

Algae: You know it when you see it. It’s the slimy green carpet that blankets the top of ponds or neglected swimming pools. It may be long strands of seaweed, sometimes used for fertilizer or food, that sway with the ocean tide. Read More

Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com

Not all math skills are learned in the classroom. Some of them come naturally. Consider the split-second calculations you make when you estimate the number of empty seats on the school bus or gauge the number of cookies in a cookie jar. Read More

Atomic Drive

Trucks, tractors, and bulldozers are impressive machines. They can rip into the earth or carry tons of gear. Large vans line the streets of many neighborhoods in the United States. Meanwhile, everyday automobiles seem to be getting bigger and bigger. A n Read More

The Annual GSAT Scholarships By JNBS GSAT Scholarships Jamaica

Each year, the Society works in tandem with the Ministry of Education to identify 17 students who excelled in the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) and who have not been awarded other scholarships. In addition, ten (10) children of Jamaica National employ Read More

New Monkey Business

A new kind of monkey is giving scientists a lot to think about. Two groups of researchers independently discovered the rare creature in different forests in Tanzania last year (see "New Mammals"). They classified the shy animal as a mangabey, a type of p Read More

Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power

Where do mussels get their muscle? Waves can crash over them, but mussels keep holding tight to shoreline rocks. These tough little mollusks can even cling to the underside of a ship to hitch a ride across the ocean. Read More

Birds We Eat

Birds have always been an important food source for man. In addition to domestic species that provide us with eggs, there are still other species that are hunted in the wild for sport and for food. Some are quite common, like chicken and turkey. Read More

Catching a Comet's Tail

It's been a bumpy ride for the spacecraft known as Stardust. On Jan. 2, the NASA craft got within 240 kilometers of the core of a comet known as Wild 2 (pronounced Vilt 2). The region around the comet's core is a blizzard of dust and debris. Read More

Whales

Gentle giants of the open oceans, whales are among the earth's oldest and largest creatures. Living in a watery world so far removed from our own, our understanding of whales is still advancing, and mysteries still surrounding their behavior. Read More

Tinkering With the Basic Bike

Bicycles are a great way to get around. They're fun to ride, especially down hills. And, as you whiz along the road, you might also think of ways in which you could improve your bike—make it safer, more efficient, more comfortable, or more versatile. Read More

Miniature Schnauzers

The Miniature Schnauzer is a breed of small dog of the Schnauzer type that originated in Germany in the mid-to-late 19th century. Read More

Video Game Violence

We read every message that readers submit to Science News for Kids, and we learn a lot from what you say. Two articles that really got you talking looked at video games. One story argued that video games can be good for you (see "What Video Games Can Teac Read More

Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life

It's hard to believe today, but millions of years ago the dusty New Mexico desert was covered by a shimmering ocean. That ocean water evaporated long ago. But it left behind huge deposits of salt. Some of those salt deposits contain tiny pockets of trappe Read More

Road Bumps

If you've ever been in a car that's traveling down a dirt road, you know how bumpy the ride can be. Dirt roads often develop ridges—and until recently, no one knew why. Read More

Bedbugs

The common bedbug (Cimex lectularius) is the best adapted to human environments. It is found in temperate climates throughout the world and has been known since ancient times. Bedbugs are often erroneously associated with filth. Read More

Peafowl

The term peafowl can refer to any of three species of bird in the genera Pavo and Afropavo of the pheasant family, Phasianidae. They are most notable for the male's extravagant tail, which it displays as part of courtship. The male is the peacock. Read More

A 'Book' on Every Living Thing

Fish that weigh more than a refrigerator. Fish with glowing slime. Fish that look like cows—or at least did to the folks who named them cowfish (and these creatures do have long faces). Read More

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March 21-22, 2013:  Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam

March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam

Chief Education Officer in the Ministry of Education, Grace McLean, said all is in place for this year’s sitting of the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT). ... Read More

Childhood's Long History

Childhood's Long History

You're lucky. Compared to other animals, you get to be a kid for a long time before you have to strike off on your own. Recent studies suggest that people have been enjoying long childhoods for many t... Read More

White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks

White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks

When you think of things that are white and fuzzy, usually you think of something cute or nice. But a newly discovered fuzzy, white mold may be making bats in the Northeast U.S. sick. ... Read More

Solving a Sedna Mystery

Solving a Sedna Mystery

Orbiting beyond Pluto, a planetoid called Sedna has aroused plenty of curiosity—and created some confusion—since its discovery last year. It's the most-remote object known in the solar system. ... Read More

Lightening Your Mood

Lightening Your Mood

Everyone gets the blues sometimes, but some people can feel so down that they need medical attention. More than just sadness, such serious depression is an illness that can make people feel hopeless a... Read More

Ducks

Ducks

Duck is the common name for a number of species in the Anatidae family of birds. The ducks are divided between several subfamilies listed in full in the Anatidae article. Ducks are mostly aquatic bird... Read More

Bumblebee Bats

Bumblebee Bats

The Bumblebee bat, or perhaps more correctly Kitti's Hog-nosed bat, (Craseonycteris thonglongyai) is the world's smallest species of bat at 30-40 mm in length and weighing approximately 2 grams (about... Read More

Snowflakes and Avalanches

Snowflakes and Avalanches

High on a mountainside, ski patroller Karl Birkeland dug a pit into a drift to check the snow's stability. He declared the slope safe for skiing. The danger of an avalanche appeared low. It was 1985,... Read More

Wildcats

Wildcats

The wildcat Felis silvestris, sometimes "wildcat" or "wild-cat" especially when distinguishing from other wild species of felines, is a small predator native to Europe, the western... Read More

Llamas

Llamas

The Llama skull generally resembles that of Camelus, the relatively larger brain-cavity and orbits and less developed cranial ridges being due to its smaller size. The nasal bones are shorter and broa... Read More

Surf Watch

Surf Watch

I usually hate getting up early. But during a recent surfing trip to Mexico, I was up with the sun. I couldn't wait to get to the beach. Even so, I didn't plunge into the water right away. I watched ... Read More

Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint

Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint

Unearthing the distant past is one thing. Preserving it is another. Chemistry can be part of the answer. Over the last 30 years, archaeologists have dug up more than a thousand, life-size warrior stat... Read More

Big Squid

Big Squid

Fishermen in Florida recently discovered the remains of a humongous squid unlike any creature ever seen in the Atlantic Ocean. The creature's Jell-O-like body wasn't completely intact, but the living ... Read More

Improving the Camel

Improving the Camel

When I signed up for a 2-day camel trek during my recent trip to India, I was worried that the camel would spit at me, throw me off its back, or run full speed into the desert as I clutched its neck f... Read More

Bright Blooms That Glow

Bright Blooms That Glow

The screaming pinks, blazing oranges, neon reds, and acid greens of many posters and signs owe their brightness to the way those materials are affected by light. ... Read More









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