Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Watering the Air
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Salamanders
Animals
A Tongue and a Half
Big Squid
Hearing Whales
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
The Other Side of the Zoo Fence
Swine flu goes global
Birds
Lovebirds
Swifts
Ibises
Chemistry and Materials
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Getting the dirt on carbon
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Computers
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
The science of disappearing
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
Dino Takeout for Mammals
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Earth Rocks On
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Shrinking Glaciers
Environment
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
To Catch a Dragonfly
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
Watching deep-space fireworks
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
Skates and Rays
Hammerhead Sharks
Seahorses
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
Food for Life
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Play for Science
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Heavy Sleep
Cell Phone Tattlers
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
Crustaceans
Insects
Sea Urchin
Mammals
African Hippopotamus
Black Bear
Porcupines
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Project Music
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Fast-flying fungal spores
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Anacondas
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Return to Space
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
A Satellite of Your Own
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Robots on the Road, Again
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Watering the Air
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CrawfishCrawfish - Crawfish

Crawfish

Crayfish, sometimes called crawfish, or crawdads are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. They are found in bodies of fresh water that do not freeze to the bottom, and which have shelter against harm. Read More



Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone

Fires deserve just as much attention as rocks and bears, Renkin insists. "We see the effects of fire on the landscape everywhere we look," he says. "Even when you are looking at trees that are green, they are all born from an earlier fire." Read More

Manatees

Manatees inhabit the shallow, marshy coastal areas of North, Central, and South America, and the Caribbean Sea. They spend half of their day sleeping in the water, surfacing for air every 20 minutes. Read More

Flamingos

Flamingos are gregarious wading birds in the genus Phoenicopterus and family Phoenicopteridae. They are found in both the Western and Eastern Hemispheres, but are more numerous in the latter. Read More

Spiders

Spiders are predatory invertebrate animals with two body segments, eight legs, no chewing mouth parts and no wings. All spiders produce silk, a thin, strong protein strand extruded by the spider from spinnerets. Read More

The tell-tale bacteria

Look closely at your hands — are they clean? It doesn’t matter how many times you wash your hands, they’re still crawling with tiny organisms called microbes. (You may know microbes by their other names, such as “germs” or “bacteria.”) Read More

Doves

The doves are the 308 species of near passerine birds in the order Columbiformes. The terms dove and pigeon are used interchangeably, although smaller species are more likely to be called doves. Read More

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to watch it with your unprotected eyes. Read More

Games with a Purpose

There's a new kind of game on the Internet. When you play it, you do more than simply rack up points or have fun. As you play, you help computers develop new skills. Computer scientist Luis von Ahn created the games as a way to solve problems that are di Read More

Getting the dirt on carbon

Each year, spring comes, plants bloom and the trees leaf out in their full green glory. Come fall, while diving into piles of fallen leaves, you may think the life cycle of the leaf has come to an end. But that’s not so. Once a leaf hits the dirt, a new Read More

An Ancient Spider's Web

A spider's silk web is strong enough to snare insects, but usually too delicate to withstand harsh weather and the ravages of time. So, even though spiders have lived on Earth for millions of years, few of their webs have lasted that long. Now, scientist Read More

Sponges

The sponges or poriferans (from the Greek poros "pore" and ferro "to bear") are animals of the phylum Porifera. They are primitive, sessile, mostly marine, water dwelling filter feeders that pump water through their bodies. Read More

Swedish Rhapsody

It was a busy, busy week, jam-packed with fun, ceremony, and science. Twenty-four young people from 16 countries around the world were in Stockholm, Sweden. They were there to take part in the Stockholm International Youth Science Seminar (SIYSS) Read More

Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover

Movie producers love the idea, partly because it's so scary and partly because it could actually happen. The setup is this: An asteroid is screaming toward Earth. A collision is inevitable. Read More

Cardinals

The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds living in North and South America. These are robust, seed-eating birds, with strong bills. They are typically associated with open woodland. The sexes usually have distinctly different. Read More

The Pressure of Scuba Diving

At 25 feet below the surface of the water, Alex Whitaker's tooth started to ache. When he tried to dive deeper, the pain grew worse. Read More

African Wildedbeest

The wildebeest, also called the gnu (pronounced "new"), is a large hooved mammal of the genus Connochaetes, which includes two species, both native to Africa. Gnus belong to the family Bovidae, which includes antelopes, cattle, goats, and others. Read More

Ant Invasions Change the Rules

Ants can ruin picnics and drive cooks out of kitchens. The tiny invaders may also wreck the rules by which entire communities of their peers work, new research suggests. Argentine ants are native to South America, but they now live in warm places on six Read More

Minks

A mink is any of several furry, dark-colored, semi-aquatic, carnivorous mammals of the family Mustelidae, which also includes the weasels and the otters. The American Mink can be found in wooded areas and fields near streams and lakes. Read More

Electric Ray

Electric rays (order Torpediniformes) are fish that have rounded bodes and a pair of organs capable of producing an electric discharge. This shock can vary between 8 volts and 220 volts, depending on the species. Read More

Poor Devils

The real Tasmanian devil doesn't look much like the familiar snarling and whirling cartoon character known as Taz, but it's every bit as fierce. When European settlers arrived on the Australian island of Tasmania and met the small marsupial, they called Read More

Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays

Every day, boats full of tourists arrive at Shark Ray Alley, where tour guides feed chunks of fish guts to the animals. Read More

Gut Germs to the Rescue

Germs can also be good for you, researchers are discovering. Between 500 and 1,000 different kinds of microbes live in a person's intestines. There are, in fact, more bacteria in your gut than cells in your entire body. Read More

Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow

Out at sea, there are nights when huge patches of the water's surface glow with an eerie white light. Sailors have been telling tales of these "milky seas" for hundreds of years, but only now have scientists finally documented the phenomenon. First, Stev Read More

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Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer

Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer

If you want to know the temperature outside, you look at a thermometer. If you want to know what temperatures were like thousands of years ago, you have to be more creative. In the area around the Gr... Read More

Cape Buffalo

Cape Buffalo

The African buffalo or Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a bovid from the family of the Bovidae. It is up to 1.7 meters high, 3.4 meters long, and can reach a weight of 900 kilograms... Read More

IceCube Science

IceCube Science

Francis Halzen has an unusual job. This scientist studies itsy bitsy, teeny tiny objects zipping through the universe. They’re called neutrinos. ... Read More

A Light Delay

A Light Delay

Scientists from Harvard University recently demonstrated a way to catch and release light—but it’s not easy. In other words, no one will be using the new method to play a game of catch with flashlight... Read More

Of Lice and Old Clothes

Of Lice and Old Clothes

Scratch, scratch, scratch, scratch. Head lice can be a real pain, and they can keep you out of school until you get them out of your hair. ... Read More

Quails

Quails

Quail is a collective name for several genera of mid-sized birds in the pheasant family Phasianidae, or in the family Odontophoridae. This article deals with the Old World species in the former family... Read More

Roving the Red Planet

Roving the Red Planet

This little robot is a long way from home. Spirit, a remote-controlled rover with six chunky wheels, made its first outing on Mars last week. But Spirit has gotten into trouble. ... Read More

Manta Rays

Manta Rays

The manta ray, or giant manta (Manta birostris), is the largest of the rays, ranging up to 6.7 meters (22 ft) across its pectoral fins (or "wings") and weighing up to 1,350 kg (3,000 lb). ... Read More

Fingerprinting Fossils

Fingerprinting Fossils

A bone is a bone is a bone. Or so it seems. To an untrained eye, a fossilized bone doesn't tell much of a story. Scientists, on the other hand, can date a fossil with amazing precision. They can also... Read More

Island Extinctions

Island Extinctions

People arrived in Australia about 50,000 years ago. Soon after, many of the island's large mammals disappeared, new evidence suggests.Among the animals that went extinct were several species of kangar... Read More

Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows

Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows

You probably use tools all day long without even thinking about it. You pick up a pencil to write. You deliver food to your mouth with a fork or spoon. You use keys to open doors. And you probably lea... Read More

Hot Summers, Wild Fires

Hot Summers, Wild Fires

A wood fire can be handy when you're camping. You can roast marshmallows or stay warm, for example. Forest fires that rage out of control, however, are a big problem. Wildfires cause hundreds of mill... Read More

A New Touch

A New Touch

Many people who have artificial arms or legs find these devices clumsy and difficult to operate. What's missing is the ability to think about making a movement, then having that movement happen. ... Read More

A Whole Lot of Nothing

A Whole Lot of Nothing

Larry Rudnick looked deep into outer space and saw—nothing. The discovery thrilled him. "I came home, sat at the dinner table, and told my wife, 'We found something pretty exciting today,'" ... Read More

Meet the new dinos

Meet the new dinos

The last dinosaurs died about 65 million years ago, long before humans started walking around. Scientists can still learn new things about these ancient animals though, thanks to the fossils they left... Read More









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