Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Fast-flying fungal spores
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
A Tongue and a Half
Not Slippery When Wet
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Behavior
Fear Matters
A Light Delay
Face values
Birds
Blue Jays
Songbirds
Swans
Chemistry and Materials
Spinning Clay into Cotton
The hottest soup in New York
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
Troubles with Hubble
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Ancient Heights
Weird, new ant
Environment
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Salmon
Eels
Tiger Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Healing Honey
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Sun Screen
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Praying Mantis
Hermit Crabs
Camel Spiders
Mammals
Yaks
African Wildedbeest
Goats
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Electric Backpack
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Seeds of the Future
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Komodo Dragons
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
A Great Ball of Fire
Catching a Comet's Tail
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Riding Sunlight
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Recipe for a Hurricane
Warmest Year on Record
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No Fat Stars No Fat Stars - No Fat Stars

No Fat Stars

There's a limit to how big most things can get. Some people are really tall, but no one is as tall as a house. Cats can get really fat, but there's never been a tabby as heavy as a truck. And so on. Read More



Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards

Getting a phone call from a friend when you're sick can act just like a steaming bowl of chicken soup. It feels good just to know that someone cares. Read More

Beagles

A Beagle is a medium-sized dog breed and a member of the hound group, similar in appearance to a Foxhound but smaller with shorter legs, and longer, softer ears. Beagles are scent hounds and were used for hunting rabbits to larger hares. Read More

Cape Buffalo

The African buffalo or Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a bovid from the family of the Bovidae. It is up to 1.7 meters high, 3.4 meters long, and can reach a weight of 900 kilograms Read More

World of Three Suns

Astronomers have discovered a planet in the Milky Way galaxy that has three suns. It's weird enough trying to imagine three suns in the sky at once. Scientists are having a hard time explaining how such a planet could exist in the first place. Read More

Seagulls

Gulls are seabirds in the family Laridae. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae), and more distantly to the waders, auks and skimmers. Most gulls belong to the large genus Larus. Read More

Sting Ray

Dasyatids swim with a "flying" motion, propelled by motion of their large pectoral fins (commonly referred to as "wings"). Their stinger is a razor-sharp, barbed or serrated cartilaginous spine which grows from the ray's whip-like tail. Read More

Vampire Bats

Vampire bats are bats that feed on blood (hematophagy). There are only three bat species that feed on blood: The Common Vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), the Hairy-legged Vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata), and the White-winged Vampire bat. Read More

Switchable Lenses Improve Vision

Some people have the impression that wearing eyeglasses can make you look smarter. Someday, your glasses themselves might actually be smarter. Read More

The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes By Michael Sizer

Make time for nursery rhymes and read about the surprising benefits of rhyming. Read More

The two faces of Mars

When you look up at the night sky, it's hard to imagine the violent, chaotic place the solar system was billions of years ago. It looks quiet and peaceful now, but when the solar system first took shape, asteroids and other objects regularly slammed Read More

Flower family knows its roots

Jewelweeds, or Impatiens, are pretty flowers that grow in wet, shady spots all over the Northern Hemisphere. According to a recent experiment, they seem to know their own flower family. The experiment suggests that these flowers can recognize each other— Read More

Rats

A rat is any one of about 56 different species of small, omnivorous rodents belonging to the genus Rattus. The group is generally known as the Old World rats or true rats, and originated in Asia. Read More

Lizards

Although sometimes used as a general term for all reptiles, lizards are actually a specific order of reptiles. Most lizards have long, four-legged bodies with long, tapering tails, and many species have the ability to change the color of their skin. Read More

Bee Heat Cooks Invaders

Have you ever noticed how warm you get at concerts, street fairs, and other big-crowd events? Body heat from all those people really adds up. Body heat can be so powerful that some honeybees in Asia use it as a deadly weapon. A few dozen bees sometimes s Read More

Supersuits for Superheroes

Just by getting dressed in the morning, you could jump 10 feet into the air, carry 150 pounds without getting tired, and throw a baseball faster than Roger Clemens. Read More

Road Bumps

If you've ever been in a car that's traveling down a dirt road, you know how bumpy the ride can be. Dirt roads often develop ridges—and until recently, no one knew why. Read More

Eat Out, Eat Smart

Eating out forces you to make some important decisions: Do you want french fries or onion rings? Ranch dressing or vinaigrette? Ice cream or cheesecake? Read More

Turkeys

A turkey is either one of two species of large birds in the genus Meleagris. Turkeys are birds classed in the gamebird order with fan-shaped tails and wattled necks. As with many galliform species, the female is smaller than the male. Read More

St. Bernards

The St. Bernard Dog is a large breed of dog originally bred for rescue and as a working dog. A full-grown male can weigh between 150 and 200 lb. There are two varieties of the breed: the short-haired variety and the long-haired variety. Read More

Krill

Krill are small, shrimp-like ocean crustaceans. These pink, translucent animals congregate in large, dense masses called "swarms" or "clouds," that turn areas of the ocean's surface pink. Read More

The Color of Health

Nature is full of color, from rainbows and roses to butterfly wings and peacock tails. Even the fruits and vegetables you eat often have distinctive colors: intensely blue blueberries, deeply red strawberries, and richly green broccoli. Read More

Where rivers run uphill

Scientists think that lakes under the ice might act like giant slippery banana peels — helping the ice slide more quickly over Antarctica’s bumpy bedrock toward the ocean, where it breaks into icebergs. Read More

Solving a Sedna Mystery

Orbiting beyond Pluto, a planetoid called Sedna has aroused plenty of curiosity—and created some confusion—since its discovery last year. It's the most-remote object known in the solar system. Read More

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Great Danes

Great Danes

The Great Dane is a breed of dog known for its large size and gentle personality. The breed is commonly referred to as the "Gentle Giant". ... Read More

Fishing for Giant Squid

Fishing for Giant Squid

Stories of giant sea monsters have terrified people since ancient times. Some of the scariest tales involve a gargantuan squid that attacks boats and snares sailors with its gnarly tentacles. Over th... Read More

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step... Read More

Pekingese

Pekingese

Pekingese or Pekinese is an ancient breed of toy dog, originating in China. They were the favoured imperial pet. Good-natured and happy, these dogs enjoy family environments, but require regular clean... Read More

Robots on the Road, Again

Robots on the Road, Again

Any type of vehicle could enter the contest, but there was one big twist. Drivers were not allowed. Neither were passengers nor remote controls. Vehicles had to drive themselves over rugged terrain an... Read More

The Smell of Trust

The Smell of Trust

Let's say you find yourself with a pile of extra money. You meet a banker who tells you to hand it all over to him. He'll invest it and make you rich. "Trust me," he says. Do you? Whether o... Read More

Sounds of Titan

Sounds of Titan

Visiting a mysterious, alien world is usually just the stuff of dreams or science fiction stories. For many scientists around the world, the dream came true last month when a space probe touched down ... Read More

Sea Urchin

Sea Urchin

Sea urchins are spiny sea creatures of the class Echinoidea found in oceans all over the world. (The name comes from their resemblance to hedgehogs, hedgehog being one meaning of the word "urchin... Read More

Earth's Poles in Peril

Earth's Poles in Peril

The North and South poles are remote and frigid places that receive lots of animal visitors but few human tourists. But even if you never plan to visit the polar bears in the north or penguins in the ... Read More

Foul Play?

Foul Play?

Drug testing in sports is a serious matter. Athletes train hard to build muscle and body strength. Some may even resort to cheating. They can do this by abusing drugs called steroids to build extra mu... Read More

Groundwater and the  Water Cycle

Groundwater and the Water Cycle By http://www.groundwater.org/kc/gwwatercycle.html

Now that you have learned about the exciting world of groundwater, it is time to see how it fits into that endless watery process called the water cycle, also known as thehydrologic cycle.... Read More

Smart Windows

Smart Windows

A window is more than just an opening that you can see through. It can affect the way a building looks, how much energy a building uses—and even how you feel. Researchers are now working on new techno... Read More

Look into My Eyes

Look into My Eyes

If you look deep into a friend's eyes, you may imagine that you can see his or her thoughts and dreams. But more likely, you'll simply see an image of yourself—and whatever lies behind you. Our eyeb... Read More

Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections

Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections

Sports are fun, but they can also be dangerous. Broken bones, pulled muscles, and sprained joints are all common injuries among athletes. Now, researchers have identified another possible risk of play... Read More

Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor

Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor

How did people get here? Some paleontologists are fascinated with tracing our ancestors back to the earliest possible times. A fossil skull in China is the latest clue to the origin of the human speci... Read More









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