Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Seeds of the Future
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Behavior
Girls are cool for school
The Science Fair Circuit
A Light Delay
Birds
Cranes
Parrots
Ibises
Chemistry and Materials
Flytrap Machine
A Framework for Growing Bone
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Computers
Getting in Touch with Touch
A Classroom of the Mind
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
Dino-bite!
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Environment
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
Halibut
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Piranha
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Healing Honey
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
It's a Math World for Animals
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Nature's Medicines
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Grasshoppers
Oysters
Beetles
Mammals
Pekingese
Sea Lions
African Hyenas
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Road Bumps
Speedy stars
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Stalking Plants by Scent
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Box Turtles
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
A Dusty Birthplace
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Shape Shifting
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

Icy Red Planet

On Earth, ice is just another reason to love or loath winter, depending on where you live and how you feel about cold weather. On Mars, ice is much more special than that — any evidence of frozen water on the Red Planet suggests that life could have survived there at one time. Now, scientists have gathered the first direct evidence of water ice on Mars. The discovery came out of the Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The lander settled onto Mars on May 25 and has been poking and prodding at the planet’s soil ever since. Soon after touching down, the lander’s robotic arm dug a trench called Snow White near the northern pole of Mars. One of the layers of icy soil the arm dug into was as hard as a concrete sidewalk, says mission specialist Ray Arvidson of Washington University in St. Louis. From Earth, Arvidson controls the lander’s robotic arm, which uses several tools to collect samples for the lander’s other instruments. Arvidson directs the arm’s pinky-sized drill to loosen the hard soil. Then he guides a scoop to pick up the loose bits. From there, the shavings go into one of eight ovens that are part of Phoenix’s Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The ovens allow scientists to analyze the soil by baking it: Scientists can tell which ingredients are in the soil because different ingredients melt at different temperatures. After a month of mechanical troubles, the research team was finally able to bake its second sample. Some of the sample melted at 0° Celsius, the melting point of ice. The instrument also detected water vapor during the procedure. Both clues confirm the presence of water ice. Previously, satellite images suggested that there might be water ice near the Martian poles. But the new discovery is the first direct confirmation that water ice currently exists anywhere on the Red Planet. “Now, we have finally touched and tasted ice on Mars,” says William Boynton, a mission coinvestigator and lead TEGA scientist. “And I can say it tastes very fine.” Originally, Phoenix was scheduled to stop its exploration at the end of August. But the new discovery is exciting enough that NASA officials plan to keep the lander alive for 34 extra days — until late September. Scientists will use this bonus time to learn about the soil and atmosphere of Mars’ polar region. Now that the team has proof of water ice on the Red Planet, they can begin to investigate whether the planet’s icy layer of soil could have ever supported life.

Icy Red Planet
Icy Red Planet








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™