Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Silk’s superpowers
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Red Apes in Danger
Helping the Cause of Macaws
Cacophony Acoustics
Behavior
Nice Chimps
Face values
Dino-bite!
Birds
Woodpecker
Falcons
Roadrunners
Chemistry and Materials
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Silk’s superpowers
Music of the Future
Computers
The Book of Life
Games with a Purpose
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Big, Weird Dino
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Digging Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
Little Bits of Trouble
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Finding the Past
Ancient Cave Behavior
Watching deep-space fireworks
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Tuna
Whale Sharks
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
A Taste for Cheese
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math of the World
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
Gut Microbes and Weight
Heavy Sleep
Invertebrates
Spiders
Horseshoe Crabs
Scallops
Mammals
Grizzly Bear
Cows
Basset Hounds
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Project Music
Speedy stars
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Assembling the Tree of Life
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Cobras
Anacondas
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
Dark Galaxy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Flying the Hyper Skies
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth's Poles in Peril
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

How to Slice a Cake Fairly

Sharing can be hard. Every kid knows that, and mathematicians do, too. So mathematicians have spent a lot of time thinking about how to make sharing easier. Mathematicians are particularly fond of sharing birthday cake. Not just any birthday cake, but one with lots of icing and various decorations, with nuts here and coconut there. Then they ask, if two people like different parts of the cake better, how can they divide the cake into two pieces so that they're both satisfied with the piece that they each get? There's an old solution known as "I cut, you choose." You start by cutting the cake into two pieces that you like equally well. Then your friend picks the one that she prefers. The two pieces don't have to be the same size. If you particularly like nuts, for example, you might make the piece with fewer nuts bigger, so that you'd be happy no matter which piece your friend chose. You'd end up with either a smaller piece with lots of nuts or a larger piece with fewer nuts. But Steven Brams of New York University doesn't think that's fair. When you're done, you get a piece that you might think is worth half the value of the cake. But your friend might think that she got much more than half the value of the cake. For example, suppose that your friend really likes coconut, and the bigger, less nutty piece has lots of coconut. Then she'll think that she's gotten a really great deal. She got not only more cake but also the best part! Brams says that a division should be considered fair only if two people think they both got pieces of the same value. He's worked out a new procedure for cake-cutting that makes this happen. Here's how it works. You and your friend would each tell your mom where you would divide the cake into two pieces. If the two of you happen to pick the same spot, she'd simply divide the cake at that spot. Both of you would be equally happy with your shares. But suppose the two spots are different. If your spot were to the left of your friend's spot, you'd get the piece to the left of your spot. Your friend would get the piece to the right of her spot. And there'd be a piece left over in the middle. Your mom would then split the middle section between you and your friend. That way, you each get a piece that you value equally—plus a bonus! It's a neat idea, but is such a procedure practical? Would you use it? "I don't know if anyone other than me has actually brought a cake in and tried to divide it," says James Tanton, a mathematics teacher at St. Mark's School in Southborough Mass. Such schemes often don't work in practice. "Human beings are too fuzzy," he says. "They change their minds."—J.J. Rehmeyer

How to Slice a Cake Fairly
How to Slice a Cake Fairly








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™