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It's a Small E-mail World After All
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Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
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A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Volcano Wakes Up
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Challenging the Forces of Nature
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Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Shrinking Fish
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Finding the Past
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A Plankhouse Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
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Electric Ray
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Electric Catfish
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
The Essence of Celery
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
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GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
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Human Body
Heavy Sleep
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Invertebrates
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Elk
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
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Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Bright Blooms That Glow
When Fungi and Algae Marry
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Space and Astronomy
Cousin Earth
A Planet from the Early Universe
Chaos Among the Planets
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Bionic Bacteria
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
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Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Recipe for a Hurricane
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Hermit Crabs

Hermit crabs are crustaceans but, despite the name, distinct from true crab species. Most hermit crabs salvage empty seashells to shelter and protect their soft abdomens. There are about five hundred known species of hermit crabs in the world; although they are mostly aquatic, there are also some terrestrial species. A number of species, most notably king crabs, have abandoned seashells for a free-living life; these species have forms similar to true crabs and are known as carcinized hermit crabs. Aquariums: There are several species of hermit crabs that are common in the marine aquarium trade. These omnivorous or herbivorous species are useful in the household aquarium as scavengers, eating algae and other debris. The scarlet hermit crab, or red reef hermit crab (Paguristes cadenati), is a handsome and interesting species with a bright red body and yellow eyestalks, and stays rather small (about 2-5 cm / 1-2 inches across). Smaller species of a similar passive nature include the zebra hermit crab (brown legs with white bands), the red-tip crab and blue-legged crab. In Europe, the common hermit crab (Pagurus bernhardus) is popular. Size: While most species available in pet stores are small like those listed above, and are simply scavengers, others may grow quite large (some on the Pacific coast can grow to 30 cm / 12 inches) and may eat coral, clams and other crustaceans. Salinity: Most marine hermit crabs will appreciate a salinity of between 1.023 and 1.025, and temperatures between 4 to 14C (temperate species) to 24 to 27C (tropical species), with a good bed, algae to graze on and a variety of shells to change into. They will happily switch shells frequently if given the opportunity - an interesting display to watch. Pets in USA: The terrestrial species most commonly kept as pets in the United States are the Caribbean hermit crab (Coenobita clypeatus,) and the Pacific hermit crab (Coenobita compressus). Other species such as Coenobita brevamanus, Coenobita rugosus, Coenobita perlatus or Coenobita cavipes are less common but growing in availabilty and popularity as pets. The terrestrial species live primarily on land and require very different habitats to marine hermit crabs. Fossil Record: The fossil record of in situ hermit crabs using gastropod shells stretches back to the Late Cretaceous. Before that time, at least some hermit crabs used ammonites' shells instead, as shown by a specimen of Palaeopagurus vandenengeli from the Speeton Clay, Yorkshire, UK from the Lower Cretaceous

Hermit Crabs
Hermit Crabs








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