Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Newts
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Life on the Down Low
Fishy Sounds
A Meal Plan for Birds
Behavior
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
The case of the headless ant
Birds
Cassowaries
Birds We Eat
Peafowl
Chemistry and Materials
Picture the Smell
Moon Crash, Splash
Sticky Silky Feet
Computers
The Shape of the Internet
Programming with Alice
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Dire Shortage of Water
Recipe for a Hurricane
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Environment
Snow Traps
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Island Extinctions
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Megamouth Sharks
Trout
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Symbols from the Stone Age
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
A Fix for Injured Knees
The tell-tale bacteria
Disease Detectives
Invertebrates
Lobsters
Sea Urchin
Tarantula
Mammals
Glider
Cornish Rex
Foxes
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Physics
Project Music
Invisibility Ring
IceCube Science
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Sweet, Sticky Science
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Tortoises
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Planets on the Edge
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Charged cars that would charge
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Catching Some Rays
A Change in Climate
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Hermit Crabs

Hermit crabs are crustaceans but, despite the name, distinct from true crab species. Most hermit crabs salvage empty seashells to shelter and protect their soft abdomens. There are about five hundred known species of hermit crabs in the world; although they are mostly aquatic, there are also some terrestrial species. A number of species, most notably king crabs, have abandoned seashells for a free-living life; these species have forms similar to true crabs and are known as carcinized hermit crabs. Aquariums: There are several species of hermit crabs that are common in the marine aquarium trade. These omnivorous or herbivorous species are useful in the household aquarium as scavengers, eating algae and other debris. The scarlet hermit crab, or red reef hermit crab (Paguristes cadenati), is a handsome and interesting species with a bright red body and yellow eyestalks, and stays rather small (about 2-5 cm / 1-2 inches across). Smaller species of a similar passive nature include the zebra hermit crab (brown legs with white bands), the red-tip crab and blue-legged crab. In Europe, the common hermit crab (Pagurus bernhardus) is popular. Size: While most species available in pet stores are small like those listed above, and are simply scavengers, others may grow quite large (some on the Pacific coast can grow to 30 cm / 12 inches) and may eat coral, clams and other crustaceans. Salinity: Most marine hermit crabs will appreciate a salinity of between 1.023 and 1.025, and temperatures between 4 to 14C (temperate species) to 24 to 27C (tropical species), with a good bed, algae to graze on and a variety of shells to change into. They will happily switch shells frequently if given the opportunity - an interesting display to watch. Pets in USA: The terrestrial species most commonly kept as pets in the United States are the Caribbean hermit crab (Coenobita clypeatus,) and the Pacific hermit crab (Coenobita compressus). Other species such as Coenobita brevamanus, Coenobita rugosus, Coenobita perlatus or Coenobita cavipes are less common but growing in availabilty and popularity as pets. The terrestrial species live primarily on land and require very different habitats to marine hermit crabs. Fossil Record: The fossil record of in situ hermit crabs using gastropod shells stretches back to the Late Cretaceous. Before that time, at least some hermit crabs used ammonites' shells instead, as shown by a specimen of Palaeopagurus vandenengeli from the Speeton Clay, Yorkshire, UK from the Lower Cretaceous

Hermit Crabs
Hermit Crabs








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™