Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Watering the Air
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
Professor Ant
Jay Watch
Poor Devils
Behavior
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
A Global Warming Flap
Swedish Rhapsody
Birds
Vultures
Hawks
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
The memory of a material
These gems make their own way
Computers
Hubble trouble doubled
The science of disappearing
Look into My Eyes
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Environment
Blooming Jellies
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Basking Sharks
White Tip Sharks
Lungfish
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
Recipe for Health
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Who vs. Whom
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Deep-space dancers
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Dreaming makes perfect
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Invertebrates
Worms
Sponges
Clams
Mammals
African Wild Dog
Squirrels
Miniature Schnauzers
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Electric Backpack
Speedy stars
Plants
Springing forward
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Alligators
Cobras
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Warmest Year on Record
Arctic Melt
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Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. It's a medical first, and the technique may eventually allow doctors to make new hearts from patients' own cells. This should largely avoid the risk that the patient's body will reject the new heart, which often happens today. Researchers from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis started with hearts from rats that had been dead for less than 18 hours. Led by Doris A. Taylor, the scientists put the hearts in glass beakers and used a liquid detergent to wash away the dead cells. Left behind was a heart-shaped mass of proteins that normally surround heart cells and hold them together. The mass was translucent, which means it lets light through, and it had the consistency of Jell-O. Next, Taylor and her colleagues took cells from hearts of newborn rats. They injected these living cells into the hollowed-out hearts. Eight days later, the hearts were pumping weakly. And the injected cells in each heart beat synchronously—that is, all at the same time. "The fact that we can get these cells to beat synchronously is incredibly encouraging," Taylor says. It will be years before doctors might consider using this method to repair hearts in people, the scientists warn. In the study, the rebuilt hearts could pump blood only about 2 percent as fast as a normal adult rat heart can. Eventually, scientists would like to be able to use primitive stem cells from a patient's blood or heart tissue to repair his or her own organs.—Emily Sohn

Heart Revival
Heart Revival








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