Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
A Tongue and a Half
A Meal Plan for Birds
Behavior
Copycat Monkeys
The nerve of one animal
Between a rock and a wet place
Birds
Carnivorous Birds
Cardinals
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
Supersonic Splash
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Computers
Galaxies on the go
Middle school science adventures
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Feathered Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Life under Ice
Getting the dirt on carbon
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
The Oily Gulf
Shrimpy Invaders
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Ancient Cave Behavior
A Long Haul
Fish
Bass
Electric Eel
Perches
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Healing Honey
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
What the appendix is good for
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Roundworms
Clams
Mammals
Gazelle
Bonobos
Beagles
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Farms sprout in cities
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Anacondas
Sea Turtles
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
A Great Ball of Fire
Pluto's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Supersuits for Superheroes
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Middle school science adventures
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth's Poles in Peril
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. It's a medical first, and the technique may eventually allow doctors to make new hearts from patients' own cells. This should largely avoid the risk that the patient's body will reject the new heart, which often happens today. Researchers from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis started with hearts from rats that had been dead for less than 18 hours. Led by Doris A. Taylor, the scientists put the hearts in glass beakers and used a liquid detergent to wash away the dead cells. Left behind was a heart-shaped mass of proteins that normally surround heart cells and hold them together. The mass was translucent, which means it lets light through, and it had the consistency of Jell-O. Next, Taylor and her colleagues took cells from hearts of newborn rats. They injected these living cells into the hollowed-out hearts. Eight days later, the hearts were pumping weakly. And the injected cells in each heart beat synchronously—that is, all at the same time. "The fact that we can get these cells to beat synchronously is incredibly encouraging," Taylor says. It will be years before doctors might consider using this method to repair hearts in people, the scientists warn. In the study, the rebuilt hearts could pump blood only about 2 percent as fast as a normal adult rat heart can. Eventually, scientists would like to be able to use primitive stem cells from a patient's blood or heart tissue to repair his or her own organs.—Emily Sohn

Heart Revival
Heart Revival








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™