Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Newts
Toads
Animals
Assembling the Tree of Life
The History of Meow
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Behavior
Math Naturals
Surprise Visitor
A Global Warming Flap
Birds
Kookaburras
Chicken
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Pencil Thin
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
The Book of Life
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
Supersight for a Dino King
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
A Great Quake Coming?
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Sounds and Silence
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Carp
Puffer Fish
Tilapia
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Dreaming makes perfect
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Crustaceans
Octopuses
Jellyfish
Mammals
Otters
Platypus
Great Danes
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Speedy stars
Gaining a Swift Lift
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Snapping Turtles
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Ringing Saturn
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
How to Fly Like a Bat
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Recipe for a Hurricane
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. It's a medical first, and the technique may eventually allow doctors to make new hearts from patients' own cells. This should largely avoid the risk that the patient's body will reject the new heart, which often happens today. Researchers from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis started with hearts from rats that had been dead for less than 18 hours. Led by Doris A. Taylor, the scientists put the hearts in glass beakers and used a liquid detergent to wash away the dead cells. Left behind was a heart-shaped mass of proteins that normally surround heart cells and hold them together. The mass was translucent, which means it lets light through, and it had the consistency of Jell-O. Next, Taylor and her colleagues took cells from hearts of newborn rats. They injected these living cells into the hollowed-out hearts. Eight days later, the hearts were pumping weakly. And the injected cells in each heart beat synchronously—that is, all at the same time. "The fact that we can get these cells to beat synchronously is incredibly encouraging," Taylor says. It will be years before doctors might consider using this method to repair hearts in people, the scientists warn. In the study, the rebuilt hearts could pump blood only about 2 percent as fast as a normal adult rat heart can. Eventually, scientists would like to be able to use primitive stem cells from a patient's blood or heart tissue to repair his or her own organs.—Emily Sohn

Heart Revival
Heart Revival








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™