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Got Milk? How?
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It's a Small E-mail World After All
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Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Flower family knows its roots
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To Catch a Dragonfly
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Ancient Art on the Rocks
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Chew for Health
Symbols from the Stone Age
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
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Whoever vs. Whomever
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Mastering The GSAT Exam
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March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
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African Gorillas
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
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The Pressure of Scuba Diving
IceCube Science
Project Music
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Sweet, Sticky Science
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Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
Ringing Saturn
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Charged cars that would charge
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
A Change in Climate
Warmest Year on Record
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. It's a medical first, and the technique may eventually allow doctors to make new hearts from patients' own cells. This should largely avoid the risk that the patient's body will reject the new heart, which often happens today. Researchers from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis started with hearts from rats that had been dead for less than 18 hours. Led by Doris A. Taylor, the scientists put the hearts in glass beakers and used a liquid detergent to wash away the dead cells. Left behind was a heart-shaped mass of proteins that normally surround heart cells and hold them together. The mass was translucent, which means it lets light through, and it had the consistency of Jell-O. Next, Taylor and her colleagues took cells from hearts of newborn rats. They injected these living cells into the hollowed-out hearts. Eight days later, the hearts were pumping weakly. And the injected cells in each heart beat synchronously—that is, all at the same time. "The fact that we can get these cells to beat synchronously is incredibly encouraging," Taylor says. It will be years before doctors might consider using this method to repair hearts in people, the scientists warn. In the study, the rebuilt hearts could pump blood only about 2 percent as fast as a normal adult rat heart can. Eventually, scientists would like to be able to use primitive stem cells from a patient's blood or heart tissue to repair his or her own organs.—Emily Sohn

Heart Revival
Heart Revival








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