Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Animals
Lives of a Mole Rat
New Monkey Business
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Behavior
Fighting fat with fat
Primate Memory Showdown
Supersonic Splash
Birds
Tropical Birds
Owls
Hawks
Chemistry and Materials
Heaviest named element is official
Boosting Fuel Cells
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Computers
The science of disappearing
Earth from the inside out
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mini T. rex
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Warmest Year on Record
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Environment
Snow Traps
Whale Watch
An Ocean View's Downside
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Chicken of the Sea
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Eels
Bass
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Eat Out, Eat Smart
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Math of the World
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Dust Mites
Mollusks
Clams
Mammals
Numbats
Dachshunds
African Leopards
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Powering Ball Lightning
Speedy stars
Plants
The algae invasion
Sweet, Sticky Science
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Boa Constrictors
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Cool as a Jupiter
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Charged cars that would charge
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Arctic Melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
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Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. It's a medical first, and the technique may eventually allow doctors to make new hearts from patients' own cells. This should largely avoid the risk that the patient's body will reject the new heart, which often happens today. Researchers from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis started with hearts from rats that had been dead for less than 18 hours. Led by Doris A. Taylor, the scientists put the hearts in glass beakers and used a liquid detergent to wash away the dead cells. Left behind was a heart-shaped mass of proteins that normally surround heart cells and hold them together. The mass was translucent, which means it lets light through, and it had the consistency of Jell-O. Next, Taylor and her colleagues took cells from hearts of newborn rats. They injected these living cells into the hollowed-out hearts. Eight days later, the hearts were pumping weakly. And the injected cells in each heart beat synchronously—that is, all at the same time. "The fact that we can get these cells to beat synchronously is incredibly encouraging," Taylor says. It will be years before doctors might consider using this method to repair hearts in people, the scientists warn. In the study, the rebuilt hearts could pump blood only about 2 percent as fast as a normal adult rat heart can. Eventually, scientists would like to be able to use primitive stem cells from a patient's blood or heart tissue to repair his or her own organs.—Emily Sohn

Heart Revival
Heart Revival








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