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Vent Worms Like It Hot
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Supersonic Splash
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
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Groundwater and the Water Cycle
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Snow Traps
To Catch a Dragonfly
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Watching deep-space fireworks
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
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Flashlight Fishes
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Strong Bones for Life
How Super Are Superfruits?
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
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42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
Deep-space dancers
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Taste Messenger
A Long Trek to Asia
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Tarantula
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Flies
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Black Bear
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The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Electric Backpack
The Particle Zoo
Road Bumps
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Plants Travel Wind Highways
A Giant Flower's New Family
When Fungi and Algae Marry
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Sea Turtles
Anacondas
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Bionic Bacteria
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Arctic Melt
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
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Heart Revival

When your heart works like it's supposed to, it keeps you alive and well. But when the heart fails, people can get very sick or even die. Now, scientists have found a way to turn dead rat hearts into living ones. It's a medical first, and the technique may eventually allow doctors to make new hearts from patients' own cells. This should largely avoid the risk that the patient's body will reject the new heart, which often happens today. Researchers from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis started with hearts from rats that had been dead for less than 18 hours. Led by Doris A. Taylor, the scientists put the hearts in glass beakers and used a liquid detergent to wash away the dead cells. Left behind was a heart-shaped mass of proteins that normally surround heart cells and hold them together. The mass was translucent, which means it lets light through, and it had the consistency of Jell-O. Next, Taylor and her colleagues took cells from hearts of newborn rats. They injected these living cells into the hollowed-out hearts. Eight days later, the hearts were pumping weakly. And the injected cells in each heart beat synchronously—that is, all at the same time. "The fact that we can get these cells to beat synchronously is incredibly encouraging," Taylor says. It will be years before doctors might consider using this method to repair hearts in people, the scientists warn. In the study, the rebuilt hearts could pump blood only about 2 percent as fast as a normal adult rat heart can. Eventually, scientists would like to be able to use primitive stem cells from a patient's blood or heart tissue to repair his or her own organs.—Emily Sohn

Heart Revival
Heart Revival








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