Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Got Milk? How?
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Walktopus
Mouse Songs
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Behavior
Longer lives for wild elephants
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
The nerve of one animal
Birds
Flamingos
Finches
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
Small but WISE
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Batteries built by Viruses
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Fingerprinting Fossils
Feathered Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Wave of Destruction
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
Missing Tigers in India
Blooming Jellies
The Wolf and the Cow
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Manta Rays
Tilapia
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
A Taste for Cheese
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Deep-space dancers
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Hear, Hear
Foul Play?
A Long Trek to Asia
Invertebrates
Ants
Horseshoe Crabs
Camel Spiders
Mammals
Manatees
African Leopards
Chinchillas
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Speedy stars
Project Music
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Fast-flying fungal spores
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Asp
Chameleons
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Lost and Found
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Planning for Mars
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Riding Sunlight
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Where rivers run uphill
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Gut Microbes and Weight

Health experts have long worried about the increasing rate of obesity in kids. It's an important concern: Being very overweight or obese during childhood can lead to serious problems normally seen in adults, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Poor diets and a lack of exercise are usually the culprits. But would you ever have imagined there might be a connection between the bacteria that lived in your gut when you were a baby and the chance that you would become overweight? Scientists in Finland recently found just such a link. In a recent study, they showed that as infants overweight children had different species of bacteria living in their guts, or intestines, than did normal-weight kids. You probably think of bacteria only as germ that can make you sick. While it's true that some bacteria can make people ill, your body actually depends on some types of bacteria to help you digest food and extract nutrients from it. These "good" bacteria live in your intestines, where they process the food you eat. Human babies get these bacterial helpers from their moms. When a baby is born, some of tghe bacteria in the mother transfer into the baby's body. Growing babies get additional "good" bacteria from the milk their mothers produce. And it turns out this bacteria might play an important role in regulating weight just six years later. The research team examined the intestinal bacteria that lived in a group of 7-year-olds when they were babies. The children were already part of another long-term study, so the scientists had collected their data years ago, when the children were 6 months old and again when they were a year old. The researchers found that kids who were normal weight at age 7 had high levels of a species called Bifidobacterium (pronounced bih-FY-doh-bac-TEER-ee-um) in their intestines as babies. They also had low levels of other bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus, or staph for short. The researchers found exactly the opposite pattern in overweight 7-year-olds. As babies, the heavy kids had fewer Bifidobacterium and higher amounts of staph. So how could these bacteria affect weight? The researchers still haven't tested that question. But they point out that staph—the bacteria found in high amounts in babies who grew up to become overweight—has been linked to a condition called inflammation. Other studies have shown a connection between inflammation and obesity. Could the staph in some babies' intestines lead to inflammation, and therefore to obesity? Scientists can't say yet, but future tests might lead to an answer. The results also suggest that some bacteria might protect people from becoming overweight in the first place. In this study, high levels of Bifidobacterium bacteria were associated with a lower chance of becoming overweight. Bifidobacterium is also found in the milk mothers produce—and earlier studies have shown a link between breastfeeding and a lower chance of becoming obese. Taken together, these data suggest this type of bacteria plays an important role in preventing obesity. This information could lead to new ways to control weight gain, the researchers say.—Jennifer Cutraro

Gut Microbes and Weight
Gut Microbes and Weight








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™