Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
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Living in the Desert
Return of the Lost Limbs
Big Squid
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Lost Sight, Found Sound
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
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Chemistry and Materials
Pencil Thin
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Nonstop Robot
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Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Have shell, will travel
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Earth
Greener Diet
Petrified Lightning
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Environment
A Change in Climate
Plastic Meals for Seals
Spotty Survival
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Early Maya Writing
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Angler Fish
Skates
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
Building a Food Pyramid
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
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GSAT Exam Preparation
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
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Setting a Prime Number Record
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Caterpillars
Krill
Corals
Mammals
Mouse
Bats
Narwhals
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Road Bumps
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
The algae invasion
Making the most of a meal
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Rattlesnakes
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Beyond Bar Codes
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Gut Germs to the Rescue

In many situations, bacteria are bad guys. As soon as your defenses are down, the tiny microbes infect your body and make you sick. Germs can also be good for you, researchers are discovering. Between 500 and 1,000 different kinds of microbes live in a person's intestines. There are, in fact, more bacteria in your gut than cells in your entire body. Many of them may help keep us healthy. Take Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for example. The tiny bacterium lives in our intestines and feeds off the food we eat. In exchange, B. thetaiotaomicron helps break down indigestible nuggets of food into sugars and produce vitamins that we can use. The wonders of gut microbes don't stop there. B. thetaiotaomicron also seems to regulate specific genes in the gut and helps the intestines work better by sparking the growth of blood vessels. This "good" bacterium even stimulates the production of a chemical that kills other kinds of "bad," disease-causing bacteria. To study how bacteria cause disease, scientists have created mice that have no germs at all. These animals end up needing to eat much more than do normal rodents, and they are much more likely to get sick. By introducing just B. thetaiotaomicron into germfree mice, researchers can find out what changes these particular bacteria cause. These changes include altering which sugars the intestine makes and keeping gut bacteria from sneaking into other parts of the body. As more details emerge about how important gut bacteria are to our health, you might want to add a Bacteria Appreciation Day to your date-book!—E. Sohn

Gut Germs to the Rescue
Gut Germs to the Rescue








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