Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Fishy Cleaners
A Meal Plan for Birds
Young Ants in the Kitchen
Behavior
Chimpanzee Hunting Tools
Reading Body Language
Baby Number Whizzes
Birds
Flamingos
Geese
Cranes
Chemistry and Materials
Music of the Future
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Watching out for vultures
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Supersonic Splash
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Where rivers run uphill
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Finding the Past
Writing on eggshells
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Fish
Sturgeons
Angler Fish
Codfish
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
The Color of Health
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
It's a Math World for Animals
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Hear, Hear
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Flu Patrol
Invertebrates
Lobsters
Scorpions
Black Widow spiders
Mammals
Quokkas
Badgers
Sea Lions
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Speedy stars
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Making the most of a meal
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Lizards
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
A Smashing Display
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Technology and Engineering
Reach for the Sky
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
How to Fly Like a Bat
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Gut Germs to the Rescue

In many situations, bacteria are bad guys. As soon as your defenses are down, the tiny microbes infect your body and make you sick. Germs can also be good for you, researchers are discovering. Between 500 and 1,000 different kinds of microbes live in a person's intestines. There are, in fact, more bacteria in your gut than cells in your entire body. Many of them may help keep us healthy. Take Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for example. The tiny bacterium lives in our intestines and feeds off the food we eat. In exchange, B. thetaiotaomicron helps break down indigestible nuggets of food into sugars and produce vitamins that we can use. The wonders of gut microbes don't stop there. B. thetaiotaomicron also seems to regulate specific genes in the gut and helps the intestines work better by sparking the growth of blood vessels. This "good" bacterium even stimulates the production of a chemical that kills other kinds of "bad," disease-causing bacteria. To study how bacteria cause disease, scientists have created mice that have no germs at all. These animals end up needing to eat much more than do normal rodents, and they are much more likely to get sick. By introducing just B. thetaiotaomicron into germfree mice, researchers can find out what changes these particular bacteria cause. These changes include altering which sugars the intestine makes and keeping gut bacteria from sneaking into other parts of the body. As more details emerge about how important gut bacteria are to our health, you might want to add a Bacteria Appreciation Day to your date-book!—E. Sohn

Gut Germs to the Rescue
Gut Germs to the Rescue








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