Agriculture
Watering the Air
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Newts
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Jay Watch
Red Apes in Danger
Fishy Sounds
Behavior
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Body clocks
Bringing fish back up to size
Birds
Falcons
Tropical Birds
Albatrosses
Chemistry and Materials
Supersonic Splash
The science of disappearing
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
A Light Delay
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging Dinos
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Farms sprout in cities
A Dire Shortage of Water
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Environment
Blooming Jellies
The Birds are Falling
Plant Gas
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Words of the Distant Past
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Puffer Fish
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
How Super Are Superfruits?
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
Detecting True Art
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Disease Detectives
Surviving Olympic Heat
Cell Phone Tattlers
Invertebrates
Lobsters
Cockroaches
Nautiluses
Mammals
Quokkas
Cornish Rex
Golden Retrievers
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
IceCube Science
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Springing forward
Underwater Jungles
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Snakes
Crocodiles
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Reach for the Sky
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Groundwater and the Water Cycle

Now that you have learned about the exciting world of groundwater, it is time to see how it fits into that endless watery process called the water cycle, also known as thehydrologic cycle.

Let's begins our tour of the water cycle when water from the earth’s soil, plants, and water bodies turns into water vapor through the process of evaporation. This invisible vapor, most of which comes from the world’s oceans, travels up into the atmosphere and condenses, forming clouds. This is called condensation. The vapors in the clouds condense more and more until they form water droplets.

More and more water vapor combines with the water droplet until it is too heavy to stay in the sky any longer. The water falls to the earth far below as precipitation. Examples of precipitation include rain, hail, sleet, and snow.

groundwater and the water cycle, animated

When the water reaches the earth’s surface, some of it will flow along the surface of the earth as runoff while the rest of it soaks into the soil--called recharge. Down, down, down the water goes through the soil until it becomes groundwater and is stored in the aquifer below.

Once the water has joined the aquifer, it doesn’t stop there. The groundwater slowly moves through the spaces and cracks between the soil particles on its journey to lower elevations. This movement of water underground is called groundwater flow.

Eventually, after years of underground movement, the groundwater comes to adischarge area where it enters a lake or stream. There, the water will once again be evaporated and begin the cycle again. Water has been transported through the water cycle for millions of years and will continue this cycle forever. In the water cycle, water is constantly on the move.

Groundwater and the  Water Cycle









Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™