Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Animals
Putting a Mouse on Pause
Missing Moose
Baboons Listen for Who's Tops
Behavior
Copycat Monkeys
Flower family knows its roots
The Other Side of the Zoo Fence
Birds
Rheas
Cranes
Quails
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
Supersonic Splash
Picture the Smell
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Games with a Purpose
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
The man who rocked biology to its core
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Farms sprout in cities
Deep History
Environment
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
A Change in Leaf Color
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Salt and Early Civilization
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Flounder
Bass
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
The mercury in that tuna
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Deep-space dancers
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Gut Microbes and Weight
Invertebrates
Ticks
Lice
Starfish
Mammals
Humpback Whales
Pugs
Badgers
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Speedy stars
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Fungus Hunt
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Lizards
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Revving Up Green Machines
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Watering the Air
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker

An amazing sighting has thrilled birdwatchers, scientists, and environmentalists around the world: The ivory-billed woodpecker is aliveLong feared extinct, the legendary bird has recently been spotted by several people in the cypress and tupelo swamps of eastern Arkansas. A video confirmed the sightings. It's an extraordinary find because no one ever thought we'd see a living ivory-billed woodpecker again. Long feared extinct, the legendary bird has recently been spotted by several people in the cypress and tupelo swamps of eastern Arkansas. A video confirmed the sightings. It's an extraordinary find because no one ever thought we'd see a living ivory-billed woodpecker again. "In the world of birding, nothing could be more longed for than to rediscover this bird," said John Fitzpatrick, director of Cornell University's Laboratory of Ornithology. The birds used to live throughout the ancient forests of the southeastern United States and Cuba. And they were magnificent. Measuring some 20 inches (almost 2 feet!) from the top of their heads to the tip of their tails, they ranked as the third largest woodpeckers in the world. However, as logging destroyed the trees in which they lived, ivory-billed woodpeckers began to disappear. The last definite sighting was in 1944. Then, in February 2004, a man named Gene Sparling was kayaking in the bayous of Arkansas's Cache River National Wildlife Refuge, when he saw what he thought was a large, red-crested woodpecker. He posted a report about his sighting on the Internet. Two men who had long been searching for the ivory-billed woodpecker saw Sparling's report and were curious enough to join him on a tour of the refuge. At one point, a big bird with bold white patches under its wings flapped toward them. "We almost fell out of the canoe," says Tim Gallagher, editor of Cornell's Living Bird magazine. A video recorded later by a researcher in a canoe provided confirmation that the bird was truly an ivory-billed woodpecker.

Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™