Agriculture
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Watching out for vultures
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Salamanders
Newts
Toads
Animals
Professor Ant
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Little Bee Brains That Could
Behavior
When Darwin got sick of feathers
Primate Memory Showdown
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Birds
Flightless Birds
Birds We Eat
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
The chemistry of sleeplessness
The Taste of Bubbles
A Framework for Growing Bone
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Programming with Alice
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Have shell, will travel
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth from the inside out
Riding to Earth's Core
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
Giant snakes invading North America
What is groundwater
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Finding the Past
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Tuna
Trout
Piranha
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Chew for Health
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Order of Adjectives
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math of the World
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
Germ Zapper
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Mosquitos
Spiders
Praying Mantis
Mammals
Walrus
Yaks
Vampire Bats
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Children and Media
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Einstein's Skateboard
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Flower family knows its roots
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Geckos
Sea Turtles
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
An Icy Blob of Fluff
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on a Rocky Road
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Warmest Year on Record
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Giant Squid

Giant squid, once believed to be mythical creatures, are squid of the Architeuthidae family, represented by as many as eight species of the genus Architeuthis. Real giants: They are deep-ocean dwelling squid that can grow to a tremendous size: recent estimates put the maximum size at 10 m (34 ft) for males and 13 m (44 ft) for females from caudal fin to the tip of the two long tentacles (second only to the Colossal Squid at an estimated 14 m, one of the largest living organisms). The mantle length, though, is only about 2 m (7 ft) in length (more for females, less for males), and the length of the squid excluding its tentacles is about 5 m (16 ft). There were reported claims of specimens of up to 20 m (66 ft), but none had been scientifically documented. Light giants: Despite their great length, giant squid are not particularly heavy when compared to their chief predator, the Sperm Whale, because the majority of their length is taken up by their eight arms and two tentacles. The weights of recovered specimens have been measured in hundreds, rather than thousands, of kilograms. Post-larval juveniles have been discovered in surface waters off New Zealand, and there are plans to capture more such juveniles and maintain them in an aquarium in an attempt to learn more about the creature's biology and habits. Second largest eyes: Giant squid possess the second largest eyes of any living creature, over 1 foot (30 cm) in diameter, and their arms are equipped with hundreds of suction cups in total; each is mounted on an individual "stalk" and equipped around its circumference with a ring of sharp teeth to aid the creature in capturing its prey by firmly attaching itself to it both by suction and perforation. The size of these suction cups can vary from 2 to 5 cm in diameter (one to two inches), and it is not uncommon to find their circular scars on the head area of sperm whales that have fed — or attempted to feed — upon giant squid. The only other known predator of the adult giant squid is the Pacific sleeper shark, found off Antarctica, but it is not yet known whether these sharks actively hunt the squid, or are simply scavengers of squid carcasses. Because sperm whales are skilled at locating giant squid, scientists have attempted to conduct in-depth observations of sperm whales in order to study squid. Buoyant and untasty: One of the more unusual aspects of giant squid (as well as some other species of large squid) is their reliance upon the low density of ammonia in relation to seawater to maintain neutral buoyancy in their natural environment, as they lack the gas-filled swim bladder that fish use for this function; instead, they use ammonia (in the form of ammonium chloride) in the fluid of their flesh throughout their bodies, making it taste not unlike salmiakki. This makes the giant squid unattractive for general human consumption, although sperm whales seem to be attracted by (or are at least tolerant of) its taste. Growth rings: Like all cephalopods they use special organs called statocysts to sense their orientation and motion in the water. The age of giant squids can be estimated by "growth rings" in the statocyst's "statolyth" much like counting tree rings. Much of what is known about these animals come from estimates based on these, and from undigested beaks found in sperm whale stomachs. Mysterious mating: The reproductive cycle of the giant squid is still a great mystery, but what has been learned so far is both bizarre and fascinating; male giant squid are equipped with a prehensile spermatophore-depositing tube, or penis, of over 3 feet (90 cm) in length, which extends from inside the animal's mantle and apparently is used to inject sperm-containing packets into the female squid's arms — how exactly the sperm then is transferred to the egg mass is a matter of much debate, but the recent recovery in Tasmania of a female specimen having a small subsidiary tendril attached to the base of each of its eight arms could be a vital clue in the solution of this enigma. The giant squid lacks the hectocotylus used for reproduction in many other cephalopods.

Giant Squid
Giant Squid








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™