Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Fast-flying fungal spores
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Cool Penguins
Color-Changing Bugs
Hearing Whales
Behavior
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Brain cells take a break
Internet Generation
Birds
Owls
Parakeets
Pheasants
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
Watching out for vultures
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Computers
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Supersonic Splash
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
An Ancient Spider's Web
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Plastic-munching microbes
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Environment
Flu river
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
A Change in Time
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Childhood's Long History
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Tuna
Electric Eel
Salmon
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Scholarship
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Detecting True Art
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Disease Detectives
Hey batter, wake up!
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Krill
Crustaceans
Hermit Crabs
Mammals
Guinea Pigs
Orangutans
German Shepherds
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Dreams of Floating in Space
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Making the most of a meal
The algae invasion
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Caimans
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Planning for Mars
Dark Galaxy
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Robots on the Road, Again
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Earth's Poles in Peril
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Germ Zapper

You've probably experienced the power of antibiotics. These amazing medicines kill the bacteria that give you strep throat and other infections. Usually, you start feeling better after a day or two of treatment. Antibiotics have become so widely used, however, that many bacteria have developed ways to survive treatment. And when antibiotics stop working, sick people end up getting sicker. Tens of thousands of people die each year as a result. Now, scientists at Merck Research Laboratories in Rahway, N.J., may have found a new weapon against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Lab tests in mice show that a compound called platensimycin attacks—and kills—certain bacteria in a new way. Antibiotics were developed more than 50 years ago, and most types currently available work the same way as the early kind did. They attack bacteria cell walls. Or, they disable bacteria by knocking out the parts of the cell that make DNA and proteins. Platensimycin takes a different approach. It attacks an enzyme that bacteria need to build and maintain membranes in their cells. Enzymes are types of proteins that make chemical reactions happen more quickly. The neat thing about platensimycin is that it exists in nature. It is, in fact, the fourth natural compound found that targets the same enzyme. It's also, by far, the most powerful of the four compounds. "Nature is telling us again and again that if you want to go after bacteria, go after this enzyme," says Charles O. Rock, a biochemist at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. The Merck scientists found platensimycin by sorting through about 250,000 natural compounds. The search led to platensimycin, which is a small molecule made by a bacterium that lives in the soil in South Africa. Scientists aren't yet sure whether platensimycin will work as a drug in people. Still, the research is another example of how good nature can be at solving problems.—E. Sohn

Germ Zapper
Germ Zapper








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