Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Seeds of the Future
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Animals
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Not Slippery When Wet
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Behavior
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Birds
Vultures
Blue Jays
Owls
Chemistry and Materials
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Supergoo to the rescue
Computers
New eyes to scan the skies
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Wave of Destruction
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Environment
Catching Some Rays
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Watching deep-space fireworks
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Eels
Goldfish
Dogfish
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math Naturals
Human Body
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Flu Patrol
Invertebrates
Crabs
Praying Mantis
Spiders
Mammals
Little Brown Bats
Yaks
Beagles
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Powering Ball Lightning
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Turtles
Pythons
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Weaving with Light
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Charged cars that would charge
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
A Dire Shortage of Water
Where rivers run uphill
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Germ Zapper

You've probably experienced the power of antibiotics. These amazing medicines kill the bacteria that give you strep throat and other infections. Usually, you start feeling better after a day or two of treatment. Antibiotics have become so widely used, however, that many bacteria have developed ways to survive treatment. And when antibiotics stop working, sick people end up getting sicker. Tens of thousands of people die each year as a result. Now, scientists at Merck Research Laboratories in Rahway, N.J., may have found a new weapon against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Lab tests in mice show that a compound called platensimycin attacks—and kills—certain bacteria in a new way. Antibiotics were developed more than 50 years ago, and most types currently available work the same way as the early kind did. They attack bacteria cell walls. Or, they disable bacteria by knocking out the parts of the cell that make DNA and proteins. Platensimycin takes a different approach. It attacks an enzyme that bacteria need to build and maintain membranes in their cells. Enzymes are types of proteins that make chemical reactions happen more quickly. The neat thing about platensimycin is that it exists in nature. It is, in fact, the fourth natural compound found that targets the same enzyme. It's also, by far, the most powerful of the four compounds. "Nature is telling us again and again that if you want to go after bacteria, go after this enzyme," says Charles O. Rock, a biochemist at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. The Merck scientists found platensimycin by sorting through about 250,000 natural compounds. The search led to platensimycin, which is a small molecule made by a bacterium that lives in the soil in South Africa. Scientists aren't yet sure whether platensimycin will work as a drug in people. Still, the research is another example of how good nature can be at solving problems.—E. Sohn

Germ Zapper
Germ Zapper








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