Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
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Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
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Not Slippery When Wet
Little Beetle, Big Horns
Fishy Sounds
Behavior
Baby Talk
Primate Memory Showdown
Face values
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Cassowaries
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Dodos
Chemistry and Materials
The Buzz about Caffeine
Atomic Drive
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Computers
Galaxies on the go
New eyes to scan the skies
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mini T. rex
Meet your mysterious relative
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Wave of Destruction
A Dire Shortage of Water
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Environment
Indoor ozone stopper
Out in the Cold
To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
The Taming of the Cat
Writing on eggshells
Fish
Salmon
Skates and Rays
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Healing Honey
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Foul Play?
Heavy Sleep
Invertebrates
Roundworms
Oysters
Flies
Mammals
Sea Lions
Foxes
Ponies
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Project Music
Electric Backpack
Road Bumps
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Farms sprout in cities
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Anacondas
Geckos
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Sounds of Titan
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Saturn's Spongy Moon
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Dire Shortage of Water
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Germ Zapper

You've probably experienced the power of antibiotics. These amazing medicines kill the bacteria that give you strep throat and other infections. Usually, you start feeling better after a day or two of treatment. Antibiotics have become so widely used, however, that many bacteria have developed ways to survive treatment. And when antibiotics stop working, sick people end up getting sicker. Tens of thousands of people die each year as a result. Now, scientists at Merck Research Laboratories in Rahway, N.J., may have found a new weapon against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Lab tests in mice show that a compound called platensimycin attacks—and kills—certain bacteria in a new way. Antibiotics were developed more than 50 years ago, and most types currently available work the same way as the early kind did. They attack bacteria cell walls. Or, they disable bacteria by knocking out the parts of the cell that make DNA and proteins. Platensimycin takes a different approach. It attacks an enzyme that bacteria need to build and maintain membranes in their cells. Enzymes are types of proteins that make chemical reactions happen more quickly. The neat thing about platensimycin is that it exists in nature. It is, in fact, the fourth natural compound found that targets the same enzyme. It's also, by far, the most powerful of the four compounds. "Nature is telling us again and again that if you want to go after bacteria, go after this enzyme," says Charles O. Rock, a biochemist at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. The Merck scientists found platensimycin by sorting through about 250,000 natural compounds. The search led to platensimycin, which is a small molecule made by a bacterium that lives in the soil in South Africa. Scientists aren't yet sure whether platensimycin will work as a drug in people. Still, the research is another example of how good nature can be at solving problems.—E. Sohn

Germ Zapper
Germ Zapper








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