Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
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Big Squid
Deep Krill
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
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Video Game Violence
Island of Hope
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Swifts
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Screaming for Ice Cream
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Supergoo to the rescue
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Earth from the inside out
The Shape of the Internet
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Fingerprinting Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Petrified Lightning
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Environment
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Pollution Detective
What is groundwater
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
If Only Bones Could Speak
Fish
Skates and Rays
Whale Sharks
Trout
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
A Taste for Cheese
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
It's a Math World for Animals
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Horseshoe Crabs
Tapeworms
Crabs
Mammals
Sheep
Weasels and Kin
Persian Cats
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Seeds of the Future
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Rattlesnakes
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Burst Busters
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Where rivers run uphill
Reach for the Sky
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Warmest Year on Record
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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From Chimps to People

It can be fascinating to watch chimpanzees at the zoo. Chimps are the closest, living animal relatives to people. Watching them can be like watching ourselves. To figure out just how similar people and chimps are, scientists have been studying DNA—material in every cell that makes up genes and determines much of what we look like and who we are. Recently, an international group of researchers compared the entire genome (or set of DNA) of a male chimp to DNA data from people. The results show that people and chimpanzees are indeed very similar, but we might be more different genetically than scientists previously thought. DNA is made up of units called nucleotides. The sequence of nucleotides, also called base pairs, determines what genes do. The new study found that 3 billion of these base pairs have the same pattern in people and chimps 96 percent of the time. That might sound like we have a lot in common. There are, however, as many as 3 million important base pairs that are different. The scientists found six segments of DNA that seem to have changed a lot in people over the last 250,000 years. There was also a lot of variety at the ends of long stretches of DNA called chromosomes. Other results show that chimpanzees have major mutations (nucleotide changes) on their Y chromosomes (which only males have), but human males don't have the same mutations. And genes that are active in the brain have more mutations in people than in chimps. Scientists don't yet know what all of these differences mean. The more they learn, the more we'll understand about the ancestors that we share with our ape cousins. Now, that's something to think about the next time you eat a banana!—E. Sohn

From Chimps to People
From Chimps to People








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