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Getting the dirt on carbon
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
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Salamanders and Newts
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Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
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A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
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Two monkeys see a more colorful world
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Lost Sight, Found Sound
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Bandages that could bite back
Atom Hauler
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
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Hitting the redo button on evolution
Lighting goes digital
The Book of Life
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The man who rocked biology to its core
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Warmest Year on Record
Flower family knows its roots
Environment
Blooming Jellies
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Finding the Past
Writing on eggshells
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Fish
Skates
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Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Building a Food Pyramid
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
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Deep-space dancers
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
Heavy Sleep
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Centipedes
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Persian Cats
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Foxes
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
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Invisibility Ring
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Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Fastest Plant on Earth
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Black Mamba
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Asp
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
A Smashing Display
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Beyond Bar Codes
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
A Change in Climate
Catching Some Rays
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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From Chimps to People

It can be fascinating to watch chimpanzees at the zoo. Chimps are the closest, living animal relatives to people. Watching them can be like watching ourselves. To figure out just how similar people and chimps are, scientists have been studying DNA—material in every cell that makes up genes and determines much of what we look like and who we are. Recently, an international group of researchers compared the entire genome (or set of DNA) of a male chimp to DNA data from people. The results show that people and chimpanzees are indeed very similar, but we might be more different genetically than scientists previously thought. DNA is made up of units called nucleotides. The sequence of nucleotides, also called base pairs, determines what genes do. The new study found that 3 billion of these base pairs have the same pattern in people and chimps 96 percent of the time. That might sound like we have a lot in common. There are, however, as many as 3 million important base pairs that are different. The scientists found six segments of DNA that seem to have changed a lot in people over the last 250,000 years. There was also a lot of variety at the ends of long stretches of DNA called chromosomes. Other results show that chimpanzees have major mutations (nucleotide changes) on their Y chromosomes (which only males have), but human males don't have the same mutations. And genes that are active in the brain have more mutations in people than in chimps. Scientists don't yet know what all of these differences mean. The more they learn, the more we'll understand about the ancestors that we share with our ape cousins. Now, that's something to think about the next time you eat a banana!—E. Sohn

From Chimps to People
From Chimps to People








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