Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Assembling the Tree of Life
Big Squid
Deep Krill
Behavior
Taking a Spill for Science
Mosquito duets
The Disappearing Newspaper
Birds
Ibises
Birds We Eat
Backyard Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Pencil Thin
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
The science of disappearing
Computers
Middle school science adventures
New eyes to scan the skies
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Middle school science adventures
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Science loses out when ice caps melt
The Rise of Yellowstone
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Environment
Spotty Survival
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Sahara Cemetery
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Fish
Dogfish
Swordfish
Marlin
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Mastering The GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Setting a Prime Number Record
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
What the appendix is good for
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Dust Mites
Insects
Bees
Mammals
Asiatic Bears
Grizzly Bear
Sloth Bears
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
IceCube Science
Speedy stars
One ring around them all
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Getting the dirt on carbon
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Smart Windows
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Revving Up Green Machines
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Earth's Poles in Peril
A Change in Climate
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Flying the Hyper Skies

A little airplane has given new meaning to the term "going hyper." The Hyper-X recently broke the record for air-breathing jet planes when it traveled at a hypersonic speed of seven times the speed of sound. That's about 5,000 miles per hour. At this speed, you'd get around the world—flying along the equator—in less than 5 hours. The Hyper-X is an unmanned, experimental aircraft just 12 feet long. It achieves hypersonic speed using a special sort of engine known as a scramjet. It may sound like something from a comic book, but engineers have been experimenting with scramjets since the 1960s. For an engine to burn fuel and produce energy, it needs oxygen. A jet engine, like those on passenger airplanes, gets oxygen from the air. A rocket engine typically goes faster but has to carry its own supply of oxygen. A scramjet engine goes as fast as a rocket, but it doesn't have to carry its own oxygen supply. A scramjet's special design allows it to extract oxygen from the air that flows through the engine. And it does so without letting the fast-moving air put out the combustion flames. However, a scramjet engine works properly only at speeds greater than five times the speed of sound. A booster rocket carried the Hyper-X to an altitude of about 100,000 feet for its test flight. The aircraft's record-beating flight lasted just 11 seconds. In the future, engineers predict, airplanes equipped with scramjet engines could transport cargo quickly and cheaply to the brink of space. Hypersonic airliners could carry passengers anywhere in the world in just a few hours. Out of the three experimental Hyper-X aircraft built for NASA, only one is now left. The agency has plans for another, 11-second hypersonic flight, this time at 10 times the speed of sound. Hang on tight!—S. McDonagh

Flying the Hyper Skies
Flying the Hyper Skies








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