Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Behavior
Meet your mysterious relative
The nerve of one animal
A Global Warming Flap
Birds
Parrots
Finches
Rheas
Chemistry and Materials
Sugary Survival Skill
Flytrap Machine
Earth from the inside out
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Look into My Eyes
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Dino Babies
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Rocking the House
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Environment
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Flu river
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Salt and Early Civilization
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Electric Eel
Sharks
Hagfish
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Strong Bones for Life
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Monkeys Count
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
A New Touch
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Krill
Camel Spiders
Centipedes
Mammals
Rats
Mule
Wildcats
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Project Music
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Fastest Plant on Earth
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Snapping Turtles
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Earth's Poles in Peril
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Flying the Hyper Skies

A little airplane has given new meaning to the term "going hyper." The Hyper-X recently broke the record for air-breathing jet planes when it traveled at a hypersonic speed of seven times the speed of sound. That's about 5,000 miles per hour. At this speed, you'd get around the world—flying along the equator—in less than 5 hours. The Hyper-X is an unmanned, experimental aircraft just 12 feet long. It achieves hypersonic speed using a special sort of engine known as a scramjet. It may sound like something from a comic book, but engineers have been experimenting with scramjets since the 1960s. For an engine to burn fuel and produce energy, it needs oxygen. A jet engine, like those on passenger airplanes, gets oxygen from the air. A rocket engine typically goes faster but has to carry its own supply of oxygen. A scramjet engine goes as fast as a rocket, but it doesn't have to carry its own oxygen supply. A scramjet's special design allows it to extract oxygen from the air that flows through the engine. And it does so without letting the fast-moving air put out the combustion flames. However, a scramjet engine works properly only at speeds greater than five times the speed of sound. A booster rocket carried the Hyper-X to an altitude of about 100,000 feet for its test flight. The aircraft's record-beating flight lasted just 11 seconds. In the future, engineers predict, airplanes equipped with scramjet engines could transport cargo quickly and cheaply to the brink of space. Hypersonic airliners could carry passengers anywhere in the world in just a few hours. Out of the three experimental Hyper-X aircraft built for NASA, only one is now left. The agency has plans for another, 11-second hypersonic flight, this time at 10 times the speed of sound. Hang on tight!—S. McDonagh

Flying the Hyper Skies
Flying the Hyper Skies








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™