Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
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Hearing Whales
Revenge of the Cowbirds
Lives of a Mole Rat
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Math is a real brain bender
Baby Number Whizzes
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Birds
Birds We Eat
Chicken
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Chemistry and Materials
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Atom Hauler
The newest superheavy in town
Computers
Earth from the inside out
Small but WISE
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hall of Dinos
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Earth
Deep History
Earth's Poles in Peril
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Environment
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Bald Eagles Forever
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Watching deep-space fireworks
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Carp
Bull Sharks
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Chew for Health
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
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Mastering The GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
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GSAT Scholarship
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GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Losing with Heads or Tails
Math Naturals
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Sun Screen
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Invertebrates
Roundworms
Tarantula
Tapeworms
Mammals
Wolves
Spectacled Bear
Poodles
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Gaining a Swift Lift
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Springing forward
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Chameleons
Crocodilians
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Earth's Poles in Peril
Watering the Air
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Flying the Hyper Skies

A little airplane has given new meaning to the term "going hyper." The Hyper-X recently broke the record for air-breathing jet planes when it traveled at a hypersonic speed of seven times the speed of sound. That's about 5,000 miles per hour. At this speed, you'd get around the world—flying along the equator—in less than 5 hours. The Hyper-X is an unmanned, experimental aircraft just 12 feet long. It achieves hypersonic speed using a special sort of engine known as a scramjet. It may sound like something from a comic book, but engineers have been experimenting with scramjets since the 1960s. For an engine to burn fuel and produce energy, it needs oxygen. A jet engine, like those on passenger airplanes, gets oxygen from the air. A rocket engine typically goes faster but has to carry its own supply of oxygen. A scramjet engine goes as fast as a rocket, but it doesn't have to carry its own oxygen supply. A scramjet's special design allows it to extract oxygen from the air that flows through the engine. And it does so without letting the fast-moving air put out the combustion flames. However, a scramjet engine works properly only at speeds greater than five times the speed of sound. A booster rocket carried the Hyper-X to an altitude of about 100,000 feet for its test flight. The aircraft's record-beating flight lasted just 11 seconds. In the future, engineers predict, airplanes equipped with scramjet engines could transport cargo quickly and cheaply to the brink of space. Hypersonic airliners could carry passengers anywhere in the world in just a few hours. Out of the three experimental Hyper-X aircraft built for NASA, only one is now left. The agency has plans for another, 11-second hypersonic flight, this time at 10 times the speed of sound. Hang on tight!—S. McDonagh

Flying the Hyper Skies
Flying the Hyper Skies








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