Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Animals
Life on the Down Low
A Tongue and a Half
Not Slippery When Wet
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Supersonic Splash
When Darwin got sick of feathers
Birds
Mockingbirds
Pheasants
Macaws
Chemistry and Materials
The Taste of Bubbles
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Computers
Earth from the inside out
Batteries built by Viruses
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
Dinosaur Dig
The man who rocked biology to its core
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Petrified Lightning
Environment
The Wolf and the Cow
Flu river
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Electric Catfish
Flounder
Puffer Fish
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
The mercury in that tuna
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Disease Detectives
Dreaming makes perfect
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Bedbugs
Octopuses
Centipedes
Mammals
Humpback Whales
Doberman Pinschers
Tigers
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Surprise Visitor
City Trees Beat Country Trees
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Crocodilians
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
Cousin Earth
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Smart Windows
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Charged cars that would charge
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Flower family knows its roots

Jewelweeds, or Impatiens, are pretty flowers that grow in wet, shady spots all over the Northern Hemisphere. According to a recent experiment, they seem to know their own flower family. The experiment suggests that these flowers can recognize each other—or at least, recognize whether or not they came from the same mother plant. Together with other experiments, these results show that if the plants are recognizing their kin, it’s not through their leaves, it’s through the roots. Guillermo P. Murphy and Susan Dudley are a pair of botanists, or scientists who study plants, from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. In this experiment, they planted jewelweeds in pots with either siblings or strangers. Sibling plants were grown from seeds that came from the same mother plant. Stranger plantswere grown from seeds from different plants. If people were plants, then this experiment would be like showing that a person behaves differently if he grows up next to his brother than if he grows up next to a stranger. When jewelweeds were planted in pots with strangers, the plants started to grow more leaves than if they had been planted alone. This response suggests that plants are competing with strangers for sunlight, since a plant with more leaves can receive more light—and make more food. Impatiens normally grow in the shade, where sunlight is scarce. When jewelweed seedlings were planted with siblings, they grew a few more branches than they normally would if they were alone — but they did not start growing lots of extra leaves. This behavior suggests the plants are more likely to share resources, rather than compete. The plants only responded this way when they shared soil. If stranger seedlings were planted in different pots and placed next to each other, for example, they did not grow more leaves. This difference shows that the plants must use their roots to detect sibling plants in the same soil. “This is the first paper that shows that plants are responding above ground to sibling roots,” Murphy told Science News. Impatiens plants are not the first plants that botanists have studied for family recognition. In 2007, Dudley and her team studied the Great Lakes sea rocket, a plant that grows on the beach—where it may be hard to get fresh water. In that experiment, the botanists observed that when sea rockets were planted with siblings, they tolerated each other. But when they were planted with strangers, the sea rockets reacted by working extra hard to grow lots of roots, but not extra leaves. Dudley says this behavior makes sense because sea rockets, on the beach, get plenty of sun but struggle for water—so when they’re threatened, they compete for water. Impatiens, on the other hand, have plenty of water but have to compete for sunshine. The different types of plants may react in different ways, but they have one thing in common: the roots. In both experiments, on Impatiens and sea rockets, the key was the shared soil—and other plant species may turn out to show similar behavior. These experiments, as well as earlier experiments, suggest “the phenomenon is quite common," says Hans de Kroonof, an ecologist in the Netherlands. POWER WORDS (from the Yahoo! Kids Dictionary) seedling A young plant that is grown from a seed botany The science or study of plants ecology The science of the relationships between organisms and their environments impatiens Any of various plants of the genus Impatiens, which includes the jewelweed.

Flower family knows its roots
Flower family knows its roots








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™