Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Making the most of a meal
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Toads
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
The Littlest Lemurs
Color-Changing Bugs
Revenge of the Cowbirds
Behavior
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Homework blues
Birds
Vultures
Eagles
Macaws
Chemistry and Materials
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
When frog gender flips
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Computers
Nonstop Robot
Lighting goes digital
Galaxies far, far, far away
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Downsized Dinosaurs
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Have shell, will travel
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Coral Gardens
Life under Ice
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Environment
Where rivers run uphill
Flu river
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
The Taming of the Cat
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Flashlight Fishes
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Sponges' secret weapon
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Running with Sneaker Science
The tell-tale bacteria
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Clams
Moths
Scallops
Mammals
Rhinoceros
Capybaras
Chinchillas
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Gaining a Swift Lift
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
A Giant Flower's New Family
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Reptiles
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
An Earthlike Planet
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Beyond Bar Codes
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Watering the Air
Where rivers run uphill
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Flightless Birds

Birds may be best identified for their ability to fly, but not all species have that advantage. Several birds -- from New Zealand's kiwi to the great African ostrich -- have evolved wings or grown to a size which prevent them from taking flight. Where they cannot get airborn, like other birds, they have adapted other important skills: some can run much faster than flying birds, and others have become impressive swimmers. Whatever the reason for their evolution, none of them seems to mind being stuck on the ground. Not all species of birds are capable of flying. The best known flightless birds are the ostrich, emu, cassowary, rhea and penguin. Flightless birds evolved from flying ancestors; there are about forty species in existence today. They lost the power of flight because they had few enemies. Most flightless birds evolved in the absence of predators, on islands. A notable exception, the ostrich, which lives in the African savannas, has claws on its feet/birds to use as a weapon against predators. Two key differences between flying and flightless birds are the smaller wing bones of flightless birds and the absent (or greatly reduced) keel on their breastbone. The keel anchors muscles needed for wing movement[1]. Flightless birds also have more feathers than flying birds. New Zealand has more species of flightless birds (including the kiwi, penguin, and takahe) than any other country. One reason is that until the arrival of humans roughly 1000 years ago, there were no land mammals in New Zealand other than three species of bat; the main predators of flightless birds were larger birds[2]. With the introduction of mammals (among them humans) to the habitats of flightless birds, many have become extinct, including the Great Auk, the Dodo, and the Moa. The smallest flightless bird is the Inaccessible Island Rail (12.5 cm and 34.7 g). The largest - heaviest and tallest - flightless bird (and, incidentally, the largest living bird) is the ostrich (2.7 m and 156 kg)[3]. Flightless birds are the easiest to take care of in captivity because they do not have to be kept in cages. Ostriches used to be farmed for their decorative feathers. Today they are raised for their skins. Their skins are used to make leather.

Flightless Birds
Flightless Birds








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™