Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Got Milk? How?
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Toads
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Assembling the Tree of Life
Little Beetle, Big Horns
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Behavior
Bringing fish back up to size
Brainy bees know two from three
Sugar-pill medicine
Birds
Ibises
Flamingos
Kingfishers
Chemistry and Materials
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
When frog gender flips
Watching out for vultures
Computers
Earth from the inside out
Computers with Attitude
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Babies
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Hall of Dinos
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Earth
Deep Drilling at Sea
The Rise of Yellowstone
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Environment
Power of the Wind
To Catch a Dragonfly
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
Salt and Early Civilization
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Tuna
Lampreys
Whale Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Making good, brown fat
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
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How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
A Fix for Injured Knees
Electricity's Spark of Life
Invertebrates
Moths
Earthworms
Beetles
Mammals
Hares
Giant Panda
Labradors
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Invisibility Ring
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Rattlesnakes
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Mercury's magnetic twisters
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
A Clean Getaway
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Watering the Air
Recipe for a Hurricane
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Flies

As defined by entomologists (scientists who study insects), a fly is any species of insect of the order Diptera. These typically have one pair of true wings, with a set of modified hind wings. Flies are common amongst humans and some can cause the spread of serious diseases. The house fly and mosquito are particularly common amongst humans. Other flies, such as the horse fly, can inflict painful bites. The larva of a fly is commonly called a maggot. Flies rely heavily on sight for survival. The compound eyes of flies are composed of thousands of individual lenses and are very sensitive to movement. Some flies have very accurate 3D vision. A few, like Ormia ochracea, have very advanced hearing organs. The diet of flies varies heavily between species. The horse fly eats bits of flesh torn off of its prey, mosquitoes feed on blood and nectar, and the house fly eats a semi-digested liquid created by mixing-enzyme rich saliva with its food. In addition to being an essential part of the food chain, some species of flies spread pollen, hasten the decomposition of plants, animals, and dung, and, in the case of about 5000 species of Tachina flies, eat other insects. The fly life cycle is composed of four stages: egg, larva (commonly known as a maggot), pupa, adult. The eggs are laid in decaying flesh, animal dung, manure, or pools of stagnant water - whatever has ample food for the larva. Some types of maggots found on corpses can be of great use to forensic scientists. By their stage of development, these maggots can be used to give an indication of the time elapsed since death, as well as the place the organism died. Various maggots cause damage in agricultural crop production, including root maggots in rapeseed and midge maggots in wheat. Some maggots are leaf miners. Maggots are bred commercially, as a popular bait in angling, and a food for carnivourous pets such as reptiles or birds. Due to the increasing popularity of maggots, a maggot vending machine has been installed in the English county town of Northampton. Through the ages maggots have also been used in medicine in order to clean out necrotic wounds; maggots, applied to an open wound, will quickly eat the dead or necrotic parts of the wound, essentially "cleaning it" of all dead tissue. Once the dead tissue has been properly cleaned the maggots are removed, and the wound can be safely closed.

Flies
Flies








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