Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Flush-Free Fertilizer
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Animals
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Red Apes in Danger
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Behavior
Nice Chimps
Lost Sight, Found Sound
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Birds
Pheasants
Doves
Pelicans
Chemistry and Materials
A Spider's Silky Strength
The science of disappearing
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Computers with Attitude
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Island of Hope
Weird, new ant
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Environment
The Wolf and the Cow
Shrinking Fish
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Electric Eel
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Perches
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
The Essence of Celery
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Heavy Sleep
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Invertebrates
Sponges
Hermit Crabs
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Prairie Dogs
Labradors
Chihuahuas
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
IceCube Science
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Seeds of the Future
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Asp
Cobras
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
A Satellite of Your Own
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Fishy Sounds

Although coral reefs look peaceful, they're noisy places. Shrimp make popping noises that sound like bacon frying in a pan. Fish click their jaws or make rumbling sounds as they swim around. Such a loud, continuous racket may sound strange to snorkelers, but new experiments suggest that this reef noise attracts baby fish looking for a place to settle down. For a long time, biologists have wondered how reef fish find a home. Most reef fish spend the first part of their lives in open water. The baby fish, called larvae, are only about as big as a crumb. Scientists used to think that, after hatching, larvae drifted wherever ocean currents took them, perhaps hundreds or thousands of miles away. The fish couldn't control where they went. If the larvae were lucky, the currents carried them into a forest of coral where they could live. It turns out that, although the larvae are small, they actually become pretty strong swimmers. With this skill, fish larvae might be able to control where they go. And, although little fish do venture into open water, they seem to stick closer to where they hatched than scientists had expected. But, without a map of the ocean floor, how can these tiny critters find a reef to call home? Sound can travel for long distances under water. So, Stephen Simpson of the University of Edinburgh and his coworkers proposed that baby fish can hear the racket made by reef creatures. If so, the fish could follow the noise to join the party. To test their hypothesis, the scientists created a bunch of small, artificial reefs in the waters off Lizard Island in Australia's Great Barrier Reef. In some coral clumps, they played recordings of fish and shrimp sounds throughout the night. In others, it was quiet. When the researchers checked back the next morning, they discovered that about twice as many young cardinalfish and damselfish had been lured to the noisy reefs as had come to the quiet reefs. So, like kids drawn by the shouts and laughter coming from a playground, baby fish seem to follow the noises of other reef dwellers to find a place where they want to be.K. Ramsayer

Fishy Sounds
Fishy Sounds








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™