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Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Microbes at the Gas Pump
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Salamanders and Newts
Salamanders
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Color-Changing Bugs
Sea Lilies on the Run
A Meal Plan for Birds
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The Disappearing Newspaper
When Darwin got sick of feathers
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Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
The Taste of Bubbles
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Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Dinosaur Dig
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Deep Drilling at Sea
Petrified Lightning
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
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City Trees Beat Country Trees
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Settling the Americas
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Fish
Megamouth Sharks
Electric Eel
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
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The Color of Health
Making good, brown fat
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Math is a real brain bender
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
A Better Flu Shot
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Moths
Crabs
Scorpions
Mammals
Gray Whale
Persian Cats
Cornish Rex
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
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Project Music
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Road Bumps
Plants
Springing forward
Underwater Jungles
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Reptiles
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Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
A Moon's Icy Spray
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Pluto's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Revving Up Green Machines
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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Fishy Sounds

Although coral reefs look peaceful, they're noisy places. Shrimp make popping noises that sound like bacon frying in a pan. Fish click their jaws or make rumbling sounds as they swim around. Such a loud, continuous racket may sound strange to snorkelers, but new experiments suggest that this reef noise attracts baby fish looking for a place to settle down. For a long time, biologists have wondered how reef fish find a home. Most reef fish spend the first part of their lives in open water. The baby fish, called larvae, are only about as big as a crumb. Scientists used to think that, after hatching, larvae drifted wherever ocean currents took them, perhaps hundreds or thousands of miles away. The fish couldn't control where they went. If the larvae were lucky, the currents carried them into a forest of coral where they could live. It turns out that, although the larvae are small, they actually become pretty strong swimmers. With this skill, fish larvae might be able to control where they go. And, although little fish do venture into open water, they seem to stick closer to where they hatched than scientists had expected. But, without a map of the ocean floor, how can these tiny critters find a reef to call home? Sound can travel for long distances under water. So, Stephen Simpson of the University of Edinburgh and his coworkers proposed that baby fish can hear the racket made by reef creatures. If so, the fish could follow the noise to join the party. To test their hypothesis, the scientists created a bunch of small, artificial reefs in the waters off Lizard Island in Australia's Great Barrier Reef. In some coral clumps, they played recordings of fish and shrimp sounds throughout the night. In others, it was quiet. When the researchers checked back the next morning, they discovered that about twice as many young cardinalfish and damselfish had been lured to the noisy reefs as had come to the quiet reefs. So, like kids drawn by the shouts and laughter coming from a playground, baby fish seem to follow the noises of other reef dwellers to find a place where they want to be.—K. Ramsayer

Fishy Sounds
Fishy Sounds








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