Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Making the most of a meal
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
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Poison Dart Frogs
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Roboroach and Company
Elephant Mimics
Clone Wars
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Double take
Night of the living ants
Fish needs see-through head
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Atom Hauler
Small but WISE
Sticky Silky Feet
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Middle school science adventures
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
New twists for phantom limbs
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet your mysterious relative
Digging for Ancient DNA
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Wave of Destruction
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
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Shrinking Fish
Plastic Meals for Seals
The Wolf and the Cow
Finding the Past
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Early Maya Writing
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Codfish
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
Recipe for Health
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Gut Microbes and Weight
Electricity's Spark of Life
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Caterpillars
Flies
Corals
Mammals
Marsupials
Asiatic Bears
Hoofed Mammals
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Gaining a Swift Lift
Black Hole Journey
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Anacondas
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Slip Sliming Away
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Arctic Melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Fishing for Fun Takes Toll

Fishing is a popular pastime—maybe too popular when people go after certain saltwater fish. Chartering a boat or taking your own vessel out to sea to go fishing for fun is a large industry. Yet, for a long time, people thought that all the fish caught in this way represent just a tiny fraction of the number of fish caught by commercial fishing boats and sold in markets or brought to factories. The impact of sportfishing is much bigger than previously suspected, say researchers from Florida State University in Tallahassee. When the researchers took a close look at U.S. fisheries data, collected over more than 22 years, they found that recreational fishing accounts for 4 percent of fish caught. Two types of fish, menhaden and pollack, make up the bulk of the commercial catch, however. When these two types of fish are left out of the analysis, the fraction of all other fish caught and killed in recreational fishing jumps to 10 percent. Finally, the researchers looked just at species that have been classified as "overfished." That's where the numbers are more troubling. Recreational anglers account for 59 percent of red snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico, for example, and 93 percent of red drum landings in the southern U.S. Atlantic. In some places and for some types of fish, it might be time for stricter regulations, the researchers say. There are already limits on the number of fish that someone can catch in many locations. But regulators rarely limit the number of people allowed to go fishing. People aren't going to stop fishing. If they just threw back what they caught, though, the fish now at risk might be better off.—E. Sohn

Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll








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