Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Assembling the Tree of Life
Gliders in the Family
Bee Disease
Behavior
Taking a Spill for Science
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Homework blues
Birds
Mockingbirds
Swans
Finches
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Screaming for Ice Cream
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Nonstop Robot
Galaxies far, far, far away
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Downsized Dinosaurs
Dino Babies
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Petrified Lightning
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Wave of Destruction
Environment
Food Web Woes
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Improving the Camel
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
Your inner Neandertal
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Fish
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Electric Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
Monkeys Count
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Spit Power
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Cell Phone Tattlers
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Termites
Giant Clam
Mammals
Grizzly Bear
Primates
African Camels
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Speedy stars
Road Bumps
One ring around them all
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Getting the dirt on carbon
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Tortoises
Copperhead Snakes
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Planets on the Edge
Planning for Mars
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Young Scientists Take Flight
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Middle school science adventures
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Where rivers run uphill
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Fishing for Fun Takes Toll

Fishing is a popular pastime—maybe too popular when people go after certain saltwater fish. Chartering a boat or taking your own vessel out to sea to go fishing for fun is a large industry. Yet, for a long time, people thought that all the fish caught in this way represent just a tiny fraction of the number of fish caught by commercial fishing boats and sold in markets or brought to factories. The impact of sportfishing is much bigger than previously suspected, say researchers from Florida State University in Tallahassee. When the researchers took a close look at U.S. fisheries data, collected over more than 22 years, they found that recreational fishing accounts for 4 percent of fish caught. Two types of fish, menhaden and pollack, make up the bulk of the commercial catch, however. When these two types of fish are left out of the analysis, the fraction of all other fish caught and killed in recreational fishing jumps to 10 percent. Finally, the researchers looked just at species that have been classified as "overfished." That's where the numbers are more troubling. Recreational anglers account for 59 percent of red snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico, for example, and 93 percent of red drum landings in the southern U.S. Atlantic. In some places and for some types of fish, it might be time for stricter regulations, the researchers say. There are already limits on the number of fish that someone can catch in many locations. But regulators rarely limit the number of people allowed to go fishing. People aren't going to stop fishing. If they just threw back what they caught, though, the fish now at risk might be better off.—E. Sohn

Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™