Agriculture
Watering the Air
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Newts
Toads
Salamanders
Animals
Jay Watch
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Behavior
Babies Prove Sound Learners
Mosquito duets
Wired for Math
Birds
Emus
Birds We Eat
Owls
Chemistry and Materials
Pencil Thin
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Supersonic Splash
Computers
Small but WISE
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Have shell, will travel
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Earth
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Environment
Inspired by Nature
Sounds and Silence
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Decoding a Beverage Jar
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
Seahorses
Hammerhead Sharks
Trout
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
The Essence of Celery
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
Order of Adjectives
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Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
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GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
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Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Smiles Turn Away Colds
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Oysters
Sea Anemones
Arachnids
Mammals
Whales
Sperm Whale
Golden Retrievers
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Road Bumps
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Surprise Visitor
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Chameleons
Crocodiles
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Saturn's New Moons
Asteroid Moons
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Technology and Engineering
Reach for the Sky
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
A Change in Climate
Earth's Poles in Peril
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Finding Subjects and Verbs

NOTE: We will use the convention of a thin underline for subjects and a thick underline for verbs.

Being able to find the right subject and verb will help you correct errors of agreement.

Example:
The list of items is/are on the desk.

Being able to identify the subject and verb correctly will also help you with commas and semicolons as you will see later.

Definition:

A verb is a word that shows action (runs, hits, slides) or state of being (is, are, was, were, am,and so on).

Examples:
He ran around the block. 
You are my friend.

Rule 1

If a verb follows to, it is called an infinitive phrase and is not the main verb. You will find the main verb either before or after the infinitive phrase.

Examples:
I like to walk.
The efforts to get her elected succeeded.

Definition:

A subject is the noun or pronoun that performs the verb.

Example:
The woman hurried.
Woman is the subject.

Rule 2

A subject will come before a phrase beginning with of.

Example:
A bouquet of yellow roses will lend color and fragrance to the room.

Rule 3

To find the subject and verb, always find the verb first. Then ask who or what performed the verb.

Examples:
The jet engine passed inspection. 
Passed is the verb. Who or what passed? The engine, so engine is the subject. If you included the word jet as the subject, lightning will not strike you. Technically, jet is an adjective here and is part of what is known as the complete subject.

From the ceiling hung the chandelier. 
The verb is hung. Now, if you think ceiling is the subject, slow down. Ask who or what hung. The answer is chandelier, not ceiling. Therefore, chandelier is the subject.

Rule 4

Any request or command such as "Stop!" or "Walk quickly." has the understood subject youbecause if we ask who is to stop or walk quickly, the answer must be you.

Example:
(You) Please bring me some coffee.
Bring is the verb. Who is to do the bringing? You understood.

Rule 5

Sentences often have more than one subject, more than one verb, or pairs of subjects and verbs.

Examples:
I like cake and he likes ice cream.
Two pairs of subjects and verbs
He and I like cake.
Two subjects and one verb
She lifts weights and jogs daily.
One subject and two verbs

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Finding Subjects and Verbs









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