Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Getting the dirt on carbon
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
Little Bee Brains That Could
Roach Love Songs
Missing Moose
Behavior
Puberty gone wild
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Longer lives for wild elephants
Birds
Kingfishers
Hawks
Lovebirds
Chemistry and Materials
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Music of the Future
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
Computers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
A Classroom of the Mind
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Meet your mysterious relative
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Earth
Life trapped under a glacier
Shrinking Glaciers
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Environment
Blooming Jellies
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Saving Wetlands
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Settling the Americas
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Catfish
Saltwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
A Taste for Cheese
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Whoever vs. Whomever
Pronouns
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The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Setting a Prime Number Record
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Termites
Ants
Lobsters
Mammals
Sperm Whale
Badgers
Marmots
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Speedy stars
Electric Backpack
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Assembling the Tree of Life
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Geckos
Snakes
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Cool as a Jupiter
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Where rivers run uphill
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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Finding Subjects and Verbs

NOTE: We will use the convention of a thin underline for subjects and a thick underline for verbs.

Being able to find the right subject and verb will help you correct errors of agreement.

Example:
The list of items is/are on the desk.

Being able to identify the subject and verb correctly will also help you with commas and semicolons as you will see later.

Definition:

A verb is a word that shows action (runs, hits, slides) or state of being (is, are, was, were, am,and so on).

Examples:
He ran around the block. 
You are my friend.

Rule 1

If a verb follows to, it is called an infinitive phrase and is not the main verb. You will find the main verb either before or after the infinitive phrase.

Examples:
I like to walk.
The efforts to get her elected succeeded.

Definition:

A subject is the noun or pronoun that performs the verb.

Example:
The woman hurried.
Woman is the subject.

Rule 2

A subject will come before a phrase beginning with of.

Example:
A bouquet of yellow roses will lend color and fragrance to the room.

Rule 3

To find the subject and verb, always find the verb first. Then ask who or what performed the verb.

Examples:
The jet engine passed inspection. 
Passed is the verb. Who or what passed? The engine, so engine is the subject. If you included the word jet as the subject, lightning will not strike you. Technically, jet is an adjective here and is part of what is known as the complete subject.

From the ceiling hung the chandelier. 
The verb is hung. Now, if you think ceiling is the subject, slow down. Ask who or what hung. The answer is chandelier, not ceiling. Therefore, chandelier is the subject.

Rule 4

Any request or command such as "Stop!" or "Walk quickly." has the understood subject youbecause if we ask who is to stop or walk quickly, the answer must be you.

Example:
(You) Please bring me some coffee.
Bring is the verb. Who is to do the bringing? You understood.

Rule 5

Sentences often have more than one subject, more than one verb, or pairs of subjects and verbs.

Examples:
I like cake and he likes ice cream.
Two pairs of subjects and verbs
He and I like cake.
Two subjects and one verb
She lifts weights and jogs daily.
One subject and two verbs

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Finding Subjects and Verbs









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