Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Springing forward
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Jay Watch
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
Behavior
Storing Memories before Bedtime
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Birds
Quails
Songbirds
Peafowl
Chemistry and Materials
Popping to Perfection
Getting the dirt on carbon
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Earth from the inside out
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Farms sprout in cities
Warmest Year on Record
Life under Ice
Environment
A Change in Climate
A Change in Leaf Color
Whale Watch
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Untangling Human Origins
Settling the Americas
Fish
Sting Ray
Electric Eel
Seahorses
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
It's a Math World for Animals
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Gut Microbes and Weight
Heart Revival
Invertebrates
Crabs
Bees
Clams
Mammals
Vampire Bats
Persian Cats
German Shepherds
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Powering Ball Lightning
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Chameleons
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Catching a Comet's Tail
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Robots on a Rocky Road
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Elephants

Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea. Elephantidae has three living species: the African Bush Elephant and the African Forest Elephant (which were collectively known as the African Elephant) and the Asian Elephant (formerly known as the Indian Elephant). Other species have become extinct since the last ice age, which ended about 10,000 years ago. Elephants are mammals, and the largest land animals alive today. The elephant's gestation period is 22 months, the longest of any land animal. At birth it is common for an elephant calf to weigh 120 kg (265 lb). An elephant may live as long as 70 years, sometimes longer if various bone diseases can be caught early. The largest elephant ever recorded was shot in Angola in 1974. It was male and weighed 12,000 kilograms (26,400 lb). The smallest elephants, about the size of a calf or a large pig, were a pre-historic variant that lived on the island of Crete until 5000 BC, possibly 3000 BC. Their scattered skulls, featuring a single large trunk-hole at the front, perhaps formed the basis of belief in existence of cyclops, one-eyed giants featured in Homer's Odyssey. Recent findings of animal remains in central China show Prehistoric humans ate elephants. The elephant is now a protected animal, and keeping one as a pet is prohibited around the world. It has long been known that the African and Asian elephants are separate species. African elephants tend to be larger than the Asian species (up to 4 m high and 7500 kg) and have bigger ears. Male and female African elephants have long tusks, while male and female Asian Elephants have shorter tusks, with tusks in females being almost non-existent. African elephants have a dipped back, smooth forehead and two "fingers" at the tip of their trunks, as compared with the Asian species which have an arched back, two humps on the forehead and have only one "finger" at the tip of their trunks. There are two populations of African elephants, Savannah and Forest, and recent genetic studies have led to a reclassification of these as separate species, the forest population now being called Loxodonta cyclotis, and the Savannah (or Bush) population termed Loxodonta africana. This reclassification has important implications for conservation, because it means where there were thought to be two small populations of a single endangered species, there may in fact be two separate species, each of which is even more severely endangered. There's also a potential danger in that if the forest elephant isn't explicitly listed as an endangered species, poachers and smugglers might thus be able to evade the law forbidding trade in endangered animals and their body parts. The Forest elephant and the Savannah elephant can hybridise successfully, though their preference for different terrains reduces the opportunities to hybridise. Many captive African elephants are probably generic African elephants as the recognition of separate species has occurred relatively recently. Although hybrids between different animal genera are usually impossible, in 1978 at Chester Zoo, an Asian elephant cow gave birth to a hybrid calf sired by an African elephant bull (the old terms are used here as this pre-dates current classifications). The pair had mated several times, but pregnancy was believed to be impossible. "Motty", the resulting hybrid male calf, had an African elephant's cheek, ears (large with pointed lobes) and legs (longer and slimmer), but the toenail numbers, (5 front, 4 hind) and the single trunk finger of an Asian elephant. The wrinkled trunk was like an African elephant. The forehead was sloping with one dome and two smaller domes behind it. The body was African in type, but had an Asian-type centre hump and an African-type rear hump. Sadly the calf died of infection 12 days later. It is preserved as a mounted specimen at the British Natural History Museum, London. There are unconfirmed rumours of three other hybrid elephants born in zoos or circuses, all are said to have been deformed and did not survive.

Elephants
Elephants








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™