Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Salamanders
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Cannibal Crickets
Living in the Desert
Behavior
A Global Warming Flap
Ear pain, weight gain
Internet Generation
Birds
Flamingos
Condors
Swifts
Chemistry and Materials
The metal detector in your mouth
The science of disappearing
A Spider's Silky Strength
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
Fingerprint Evidence
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hall of Dinos
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Earth Rocks On
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
A Great Quake Coming?
Environment
An Ocean View's Downside
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
What is groundwater
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Flashlight Fishes
Sharks
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Packing Fat
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Sponges
Krill
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Koalas
Woolly Mammoths
Dalmatians
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
IceCube Science
Invisibility Ring
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Farms sprout in cities
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Cool as a Jupiter
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Charged cars that would charge
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Where rivers run uphill
A Change in Climate
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Electric Backpack

Backpacks are convenient. They can hold your books, your lunch, and a change of clothes, leaving your hands free to do other things. Someday, if you don't mind carrying a heavy load, your backpack might also power your MP3 player, keep your cell phone running, and maybe even light your way home. Scientists from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass., have invented a backpack that makes electricity from energy produced while its wearer walks. The backpack's electricity-creating powers depend on springs used to hang a cloth pack from its metal frame. The frame sits against the wearer's back, and the whole pack moves up and down as the person walks. A mechanism with gears collects energy from this motion and transfers it to an electrical generator. Surprisingly, the researchers found, people walk differently when they wear the springy packs. As a result, wearers use less energy than when lugging regular backpacks. Also, the way the new packs ride on wearers' backs makes them more comfortable than standard packs, the inventors say. The backpack could be especially useful for soldiers, scientists, mountaineers, and emergency workers who typically carry heavy backpacks. These people often rely on global positioning system (GPS) receivers, night-vision goggles, and other battery-powered devices to get around and do their work. Because the pack can make its own electricity, users don't need to give up space in their packs to lots of extra batteries. For the rest of us, power-generating backpacks could make it possible to walk, play video games, watch TV, and listen to music, all at the same time. Electricity-generating packs aren't on the market yet, but if you do get one eventually, just make sure to look both ways before crossing the street!—E. Sohn

Electric Backpack
Electric Backpack








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