Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Springing forward
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Animals
A Seabird's Endless Summer
Cool Penguins
Ants on Stilts
Behavior
Storing Memories before Bedtime
The Smell of Trust
Ear pain, weight gain
Birds
Parakeets
Birds We Eat
Waterfowl
Chemistry and Materials
Boosting Fuel Cells
Salt secrets
Earth from the inside out
Computers
Getting in Touch with Touch
The Book of Life
The Shape of the Internet
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Downsized Dinosaurs
South America's sticky tar pits
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Surf Watch
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Environment
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Giant snakes invading North America
Improving the Camel
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Little People Cause Big Surprise
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Nurse Sharks
Puffer Fish
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Chocolate Rules
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exam Preparation
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Running with Sneaker Science
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Invertebrates
Praying Mantis
Jellyfish
Oysters
Mammals
African Hippopotamus
Giraffes
Skunks
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Seeds of the Future
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Snapping Turtles
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
The two faces of Mars
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Revving Up Green Machines
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Easy Ways to Conserve Water

Don’t Let It Run. 

We have all developed the bad habit of letting the faucet run while wait for the shower to warm up, while we brush our teeth, or while wait for a cold glass of water. Keeping a pitcher of water in the refrigerator or turning the faucet off while we brush our teeth can save several gallons of water each day! It’s simple really, before you turn on the tap, think of ways you can use less water to accomplish the same purpose.

Fix The Drip. 
There is no such thing as a little drip. A leaky faucet with a drip of just 1/16 of an inch in diameter (about this big –o–) can waste 10 gallons of water every day. You can turn off that drip by replacing worn washers or valve seats with the help of your parents. The silent leak. Even worse than the careless hand on the faucet is the silent toilet bowl leak, probably the single greatest water waster in homes. A leak of one gallon every 24 minutes—an average amount—totals 2.5 gallons per hour or 60 gallons per day! To check your toilet for a leak, place a few drops of food coloring in the tank and wait. If the color appears in the bowl, then there’s a leak. Often these leaks can be fixed with a few minor adjustments, cleaning calcium deposits from the toilet ball in the tank, or by replacing worn valves.

Close The Hose. 
Letting the garden hose run faster or longer than necessary while we water the lawn or wash the car often becomes a careless and wasteful habit. A ½ inch garden hose under normal water pressure pours out more than 600 gallons of water per hour and a ¾ inch hose delivers almost 1,900 gallons in the same length of time. If left on overnight, one garden hose can easily waste twice as much water as the average family uses in a month.

Irrigate Wisely.
We have all seen the neighbor waters their lawn during an afternoon thunder storm. We have all seen the corner business whose whose automatic sprinkler system consistently over-waters causing sheets of water to flow across sidewalks and parking lots. Be wise, watch the weather and irrigate only during the cooler parts of the day (early morning or late evening). How do you know if you lawn requires water? Try the step test. If you walk across your lawn and the grass does not spring back up, then it's time to water. Most grass varieties require minimal watering (1/4 - 1/2 inches, once or twice a week). Set a small cup next to your sprinkler to measure the amount your particular sprinkler delivers.

Check The Plumbing. 
Proper maintenance is one of the most effective water savers. Faucet washers are inexpensive and take only a few minutes to replace. At home, check all water taps, hoses, and hose connections (even those that connect to dishwashers and washing machines) for leaks. Check the garden hose too—it should be turned off at the faucet, not just at the nozzle.

The 5 Minute Challenge.
A quick shower uses around 20-30 gallons less water than a bath. Challenge yourself and your family members to take 5 minute showers. Use a kitchen timer to keep track. Install a water-saving showerhead for additional savings.

Teach Your Community. 
Just as it is important to conserve water in your own home, it is important to help our towns and cities save water by teaching others to use water wisely. In agricultural areas, water may be saved by using more effective irrigation methods. In industrial areas, manufacturers can save water by reusing it and by treating industrial wastes. Cities and towns can save water by eliminating leaks and installing meters. Wastewater can be treated and reused. As you conserve water at home and in your community, you will help ensure that the water available now continues to meet the growing water needs of the future.

Get Started Conserving Water Today!
Take little steps each day to reduce the amount of water you use, by the end of the month it will become second nature.

 










Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™