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Silk’s superpowers
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
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Feeding School for Meerkats
Red Apes in Danger
Behavior
The nerve of one animal
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Longer lives for wild elephants
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Chemistry and Materials
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A Light Delay
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
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It's a Small E-mail World After All
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Downsized Dinosaurs
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Dinosaur Dig
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Earth from the inside out
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Environment
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Whale Watch
An Ocean View's Downside
Finding the Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
If Only Bones Could Speak
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Hagfish
Tilapia
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Recipe for Health
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
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Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
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Deep-space dancers
Detecting True Art
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Taste Messenger
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Flies
Termites
Horseshoe Crabs
Mammals
Rhinoceros
Bonobos
Black Bear
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Physics
Electric Backpack
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Springing forward
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Tortoises
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Moons
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Planets on the Edge
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Bionic Bacteria
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Revving Up Green Machines
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Change in Climate
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Early Birds Ready to Rumble

Who needs parents? Not some prehistoric baby birds! Baby birds living in the age of dinosaurs might not have been as helpless as are songbird nestlings today, who constantly call out for their parents. Instead, some of these ancient youngsters were born with strong bones and well-developed feathers, according to a team of Chinese scientists. The Chinese paleontologists found a 121-million-year-old fossil of a bird that was curled up tightly. The bird's feet were tucked under its beak, and it had a wing resting behind its head. The bird's bones were squished up in an egg-shaped space. And the baby appeared frozen in the same position that a modern-day chick would find itself just before it cracked open its shell. The scientists concluded that their specimen was a bird embryo, fossilized before it could hatch. The researchers couldn't tell the bird's species. But the baby bird did have some unusual features. Its feathers were almost fully formed. Its bones were hard and relatively strong. It had a large skull. These traits suggest that the bird could have moved around and caught its own food soon after it popped out of its egg, the scientists say. Nowadays, many types of baby birds stay in the nest for at least a couple of days and are completely dependent on their parents for food and protection. They're often covered by soft, fuzzy down, which makes them very cute but doesn't do much for their flying abilities. Fossils of 75-million-year-old bird embryos that were found previously didn't show signs of well-formed feathers either. The Chinese researchers say that, as birds evolved, chicks became more dependent on their parents. But it's also possible that the later fossils were of embryos before they had had time to develop feathers. Or the feathers simply weren't preserved. Still, the fossil found in China hints that baby birds have changed a lot in the last 120 million years. Being able to fend for itself right after hatching would make that prehistoric bird one tough chick.—K. Ramsayer

Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Early Birds Ready to Rumble








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