Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Revenge of the Cowbirds
A Sense of Danger
Behavior
Face values
Seeing red means danger ahead
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Birds
Emus
Flightless Birds
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Getting the dirt on carbon
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Small but WISE
Computers with Attitude
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Deep Drilling at Sea
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Unnatural Disasters
Environment
Acid Snails
Plant Gas
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Nurse Sharks
Tiger Sharks
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Yummy bugs
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Order of Adjectives
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Losing with Heads or Tails
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
Attacking Asthma
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Invertebrates
Hermit Crabs
Shrimps
Jellyfish
Mammals
Ferrets
Orangutans
Echidnas
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
A Change in Leaf Color
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Gila Monsters
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Burst Busters
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Killers from Outer Space
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Reach for the Sky
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Earth's Poles in Peril
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Drilling Deep for Fuel

Digging in dirt and rock is a big business. Oil and gas lie beneath Earth's surface in certain places, and these reservoirs are the planet's main sources of fuel. Until now, all the digging has happened only in Earth's outer layer, called the crust. Oil and gas wells normally go no deeper than about 6 kilometers. A new study shows that natural gas, mainly methane, may also form in a much deeper layer called the mantle. This means that new sources of energy could lie at depths of 100 kilometers (62 miles) or more. Oil and gas found near Earth's surface are often described as fossil fuels. Most scientists favor the idea that these hydrocarbon fuels were formed by the breakdown of ancient plants and animals. However, recent research also shows that methane gas can form in the crust when there are no living creatures around. Researchers from Indiana University South Bend wondered if this could also happen deeper down. So they did a lab experiment to simulate conditions in the mantle. They combined materials normally found at those depths. Then they put the mixture under extreme heat and pressure. The experiment produced tiny bubbles of methane gas, the scientists report. However, no one knows yet how much methane, if any, is actually present in the mantle. And, if it is present, whether any gas might seep up into the crust and emerge from spots on the ocean floor. The research could provide important clues about how life began on Earth. Some bacteria feed on methane. If methane were present in the mantle, it could support populations of microbes, allowing them to survive in such an extreme environment. It may also be worth looking for underground stores of methane on Mars and other planets when searching for signs of life.E. Sohn

Drilling Deep for Fuel
Drilling Deep for Fuel








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™