Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Newts
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
A Sense of Danger
Copybees
New Elephant-Shrew
Behavior
Listen and Learn
Brain cells take a break
How Much Babies Know
Birds
Chicken
Storks
Crows
Chemistry and Materials
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Computers
Programming with Alice
Graphene's superstrength
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-bite!
Fingerprinting Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Warmest Year on Record
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Environment
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
An Ocean View's Downside
Bald Eagles Forever
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Salt and Early Civilization
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Sting Ray
Goldfish
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Building a Food Pyramid
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Math Naturals
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
A Better Flu Shot
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Shrimps
Starfish
Horseshoe Crabs
Mammals
Bloodhounds
Dachshunds
Kodiak Bear
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Alligators
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Planning for Mars
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Return to Space
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Reach for the Sky
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Where rivers run uphill
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
A Change in Climate
The solar system's biggest junkyard
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Drilling Deep for Fuel

Digging in dirt and rock is a big business. Oil and gas lie beneath Earth's surface in certain places, and these reservoirs are the planet's main sources of fuel. Until now, all the digging has happened only in Earth's outer layer, called the crust. Oil and gas wells normally go no deeper than about 6 kilometers. A new study shows that natural gas, mainly methane, may also form in a much deeper layer called the mantle. This means that new sources of energy could lie at depths of 100 kilometers (62 miles) or more. Oil and gas found near Earth's surface are often described as fossil fuels. Most scientists favor the idea that these hydrocarbon fuels were formed by the breakdown of ancient plants and animals. However, recent research also shows that methane gas can form in the crust when there are no living creatures around. Researchers from Indiana University South Bend wondered if this could also happen deeper down. So they did a lab experiment to simulate conditions in the mantle. They combined materials normally found at those depths. Then they put the mixture under extreme heat and pressure. The experiment produced tiny bubbles of methane gas, the scientists report. However, no one knows yet how much methane, if any, is actually present in the mantle. And, if it is present, whether any gas might seep up into the crust and emerge from spots on the ocean floor. The research could provide important clues about how life began on Earth. Some bacteria feed on methane. If methane were present in the mantle, it could support populations of microbes, allowing them to survive in such an extreme environment. It may also be worth looking for underground stores of methane on Mars and other planets when searching for signs of life.E. Sohn

Drilling Deep for Fuel
Drilling Deep for Fuel








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™