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Spin, Splat, and Scramble
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Roving the Red Planet
Baby Star
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
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Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
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Reach for the Sky
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A Dire Shortage of Water
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The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
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Dragonflies

The dragonfly is an insect characterized by large multifaceted eyes, two pairs of strong transparent wings, and an elongated body. Diet: Dragonflies typically eat mosquitoes, midges and other small insects like flies, bees, and butterflies. They are usually found around lakes, ponds, streams, and wetlands because their larvae, known as "nymphs", are aquatic. Dragonflies do not bite or sting humans; in fact, they are valued as a predator that helps control the populations of harmful insects, such as mosquitoes. Record breakers: Dragonflies are the world's fastest insects, capable of reaching speeds of up to 60 mph. The Common Green Darner dragonfly is nicknamed "Darning Needle" because of its body shape. It is one of the biggest and fastest-flying dragonflies, able to reach speeds of 53 mph. Vision: Dragonflies have very good eyesight due to their unique eye structure. Dragonflies have up to 30,000 facets to their compound eyes; each one is a separate light-sensing organ or ommatidium, arranged to give nearly a 360 field of vision. Camouflage: It was recently discovered that dragonflies employ a particular optical illusion, termed motion camouflage, to stalk other insects that invade their territory. A dragonfly can move in such a way as to project itself as a stationary object while speedily attacking its victims, new research suggests. These findings illustrate for the first time how dragonflies use complex camouflaging techniques during aerial combat. The life cycle of the dragonfly, from egg to the death of an adult, varies from six months to as much as six or seven years. Female dragonflies lay eggs in or near water, often in or on floating or emergent plants. Most of the life cycle is spent in the larval (nymph) form, beneath the water surface, using internal gills to breathe, and catching other invertebrates or even vertebrates such as tadpoles and fish. In the adult (flying) stage, larger species of dragonfly can live as long as four months.

Dragonflies
Dragonflies








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