Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Getting the dirt on carbon
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Ants on Stilts
Little Beetle, Big Horns
Putting a Mouse on Pause
Behavior
Bringing fish back up to size
Pain Expectations
The Other Side of the Zoo Fence
Birds
Geese
Albatrosses
Emus
Chemistry and Materials
Sugary Survival Skill
Heaviest named element is official
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Mini T. rex
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Rocking the House
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
Sting Ray
Tilapia
Swordfish
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Recipe for Health
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Octopuses
Grasshoppers
Horseshoe Crabs
Mammals
Asian Elephants
Siberian Husky
Humans
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Road Bumps
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Nature's Alphabet
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Caimans
Lizards
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
Saturn's New Moons
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Slip Sliming Away
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Reach for the Sky
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Catching Some Rays
Recipe for a Hurricane
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Dragonflies

The dragonfly is an insect characterized by large multifaceted eyes, two pairs of strong transparent wings, and an elongated body. Diet: Dragonflies typically eat mosquitoes, midges and other small insects like flies, bees, and butterflies. They are usually found around lakes, ponds, streams, and wetlands because their larvae, known as "nymphs", are aquatic. Dragonflies do not bite or sting humans; in fact, they are valued as a predator that helps control the populations of harmful insects, such as mosquitoes. Record breakers: Dragonflies are the world's fastest insects, capable of reaching speeds of up to 60 mph. The Common Green Darner dragonfly is nicknamed "Darning Needle" because of its body shape. It is one of the biggest and fastest-flying dragonflies, able to reach speeds of 53 mph. Vision: Dragonflies have very good eyesight due to their unique eye structure. Dragonflies have up to 30,000 facets to their compound eyes; each one is a separate light-sensing organ or ommatidium, arranged to give nearly a 360° field of vision. Camouflage: It was recently discovered that dragonflies employ a particular optical illusion, termed motion camouflage, to stalk other insects that invade their territory. A dragonfly can move in such a way as to project itself as a stationary object while speedily attacking its victims, new research suggests. These findings illustrate for the first time how dragonflies use complex camouflaging techniques during aerial combat. The life cycle of the dragonfly, from egg to the death of an adult, varies from six months to as much as six or seven years. Female dragonflies lay eggs in or near water, often in or on floating or emergent plants. Most of the life cycle is spent in the larval (nymph) form, beneath the water surface, using internal gills to breathe, and catching other invertebrates or even vertebrates such as tadpoles and fish. In the adult (flying) stage, larger species of dragonfly can live as long as four months.

Dragonflies
Dragonflies








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