Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Vampire Bats on the Run
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Behavior
Dino-bite!
Talking with Hands
Seeing red means danger ahead
Birds
Turkeys
Condors
Geese
Chemistry and Materials
A Light Delay
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Nonstop Robot
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
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Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Earth
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
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Rocking the House
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
Watching deep-space fireworks
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Carp
Skates
Eels
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
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How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Invertebrates
Flatworms
Octopuses
Snails
Mammals
Walrus
Rats
African Wildedbeest
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
IceCube Science
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Pythons
Crocodiles
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
A Change in Climate
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Recipe for a Hurricane
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Dragonflies

The dragonfly is an insect characterized by large multifaceted eyes, two pairs of strong transparent wings, and an elongated body. Diet: Dragonflies typically eat mosquitoes, midges and other small insects like flies, bees, and butterflies. They are usually found around lakes, ponds, streams, and wetlands because their larvae, known as "nymphs", are aquatic. Dragonflies do not bite or sting humans; in fact, they are valued as a predator that helps control the populations of harmful insects, such as mosquitoes. Record breakers: Dragonflies are the world's fastest insects, capable of reaching speeds of up to 60 mph. The Common Green Darner dragonfly is nicknamed "Darning Needle" because of its body shape. It is one of the biggest and fastest-flying dragonflies, able to reach speeds of 53 mph. Vision: Dragonflies have very good eyesight due to their unique eye structure. Dragonflies have up to 30,000 facets to their compound eyes; each one is a separate light-sensing organ or ommatidium, arranged to give nearly a 360 field of vision. Camouflage: It was recently discovered that dragonflies employ a particular optical illusion, termed motion camouflage, to stalk other insects that invade their territory. A dragonfly can move in such a way as to project itself as a stationary object while speedily attacking its victims, new research suggests. These findings illustrate for the first time how dragonflies use complex camouflaging techniques during aerial combat. The life cycle of the dragonfly, from egg to the death of an adult, varies from six months to as much as six or seven years. Female dragonflies lay eggs in or near water, often in or on floating or emergent plants. Most of the life cycle is spent in the larval (nymph) form, beneath the water surface, using internal gills to breathe, and catching other invertebrates or even vertebrates such as tadpoles and fish. In the adult (flying) stage, larger species of dragonfly can live as long as four months.

Dragonflies
Dragonflies








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