Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Animals
A Wild Ferret Rise
Living in the Desert
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
Behavior
Bringing fish back up to size
Fish needs see-through head
Fear Matters
Birds
Turkeys
Pigeons
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Music of the Future
Pencil Thin
Computers
Lighting goes digital
New twists for phantom limbs
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
South America's sticky tar pits
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Environment
Spotty Survival
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Marlin
Trout
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Eat Out, Eat Smart
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Disease Detectives
Hear, Hear
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Centipedes
Crabs
Butterflies
Mammals
Sea Lions
Flying Foxes
Persian Cats
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Children and Media
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Road Bumps
IceCube Science
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Tortoises
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Baby Star
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Revving Up Green Machines
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
A Change in Climate
Arctic Melt
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Don't Eat That Sandwich!

Oops! In the rush to get to school, you drop a piece of toast on the floor. Do you throw it away or decide it's still OK to eat? If you're like most people, you eat it. Maybe you follow the "5-second rule," which claims foods are safe to eat if you pick them up within 5 seconds of dropping them. But you might want to think again. Scientists now say that 5 seconds are all it takes for foods to become contaminated with enough bacteria to make you sick. Bacteria are single-celled organisms that can cause many kinds of illnesses. Some kinds of bacteria can grow on food. If we eat foods on which these bacteria are growing, we can become sick. Common symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea. One of these food-borne bacteria is Salmonella. It makes 1.4 million people sick every year. Earlier this year, 370 people became sick after eating peanut butter that had been contaminated with Salmonella at the manufacturing plant. Salmonella are often found in raw eggs and chicken. Cooking kills these bacteria, which is why it is so important to cook eggs, chicken, and other foods thoroughly. Being a good housekeeper is a second tip for preventing infection. If household surfaces aren't washed thoroughly, they can support Salmonella for weeks. But how long does it take these bacteria to attach to food? To answer that question, a team of scientists at Clemson University in South Carolina decided to test the 5-second rule, using sandwich ingredients. First, they placed a known amount of Salmonella cells on three surfaces: wood, tile, and carpet. They placed a slice of bread and a slice of bologna on each surface for 5, 30, or 60 seconds. After just 5 seconds, both the bread and bologna picked up enough bacteria to make you sick. "Someone making a sandwich might follow someone who, a day before, used that surface to cut meat or another raw food. It might not look contaminated, but could have bacteria that would be harmful," said Paul Dawson, the food scientist who led the study. So, forget the 5-second rule. If your toast lands on the floor, toss it out. Stick a fresh slice of bread in the toaster. And this time, be careful not to drop it!—Jennifer Cutraro

Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Don't Eat That Sandwich!








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