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Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Watering the Air
Amphibians
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Moss Echoes of Hunting
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Lives of a Mole Rat
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Babies Prove Sound Learners
Eating Troubles
Talking with Hands
Birds
Doves
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Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
Fog Buster
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Computers
The Book of Life
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
Dinosaur Dig
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Wave of Destruction
Environment
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Parrotfish
Electric Catfish
Hammerhead Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
Healing Honey
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
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GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Invertebrates
Wasps
Butterflies
Moths
Mammals
Weasels
Rats
Blue Bear
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
IceCube Science
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Plants Travel Wind Highways
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Chameleons
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
A Whole Lot of Nothing
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weaving with Light
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
How to Fly Like a Bat
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Recipe for a Hurricane
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Don't Eat That Sandwich!

Oops! In the rush to get to school, you drop a piece of toast on the floor. Do you throw it away or decide it's still OK to eat? If you're like most people, you eat it. Maybe you follow the "5-second rule," which claims foods are safe to eat if you pick them up within 5 seconds of dropping them. But you might want to think again. Scientists now say that 5 seconds are all it takes for foods to become contaminated with enough bacteria to make you sick. Bacteria are single-celled organisms that can cause many kinds of illnesses. Some kinds of bacteria can grow on food. If we eat foods on which these bacteria are growing, we can become sick. Common symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea. One of these food-borne bacteria is Salmonella. It makes 1.4 million people sick every year. Earlier this year, 370 people became sick after eating peanut butter that had been contaminated with Salmonella at the manufacturing plant. Salmonella are often found in raw eggs and chicken. Cooking kills these bacteria, which is why it is so important to cook eggs, chicken, and other foods thoroughly. Being a good housekeeper is a second tip for preventing infection. If household surfaces aren't washed thoroughly, they can support Salmonella for weeks. But how long does it take these bacteria to attach to food? To answer that question, a team of scientists at Clemson University in South Carolina decided to test the 5-second rule, using sandwich ingredients. First, they placed a known amount of Salmonella cells on three surfaces: wood, tile, and carpet. They placed a slice of bread and a slice of bologna on each surface for 5, 30, or 60 seconds. After just 5 seconds, both the bread and bologna picked up enough bacteria to make you sick. "Someone making a sandwich might follow someone who, a day before, used that surface to cut meat or another raw food. It might not look contaminated, but could have bacteria that would be harmful," said Paul Dawson, the food scientist who led the study. So, forget the 5-second rule. If your toast lands on the floor, toss it out. Stick a fresh slice of bread in the toaster. And this time, be careful not to drop it!—Jennifer Cutraro

Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Don't Eat That Sandwich!








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