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A Jellyfish's Blurry View
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Mind-reading Machine
Pain Expectations
Flower family knows its roots
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These gems make their own way
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
The memory of a material
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A Classroom of the Mind
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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A Great Quake Coming?
Earth Rocks On
Flower family knows its roots
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A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Oldest Writing in the New World
Fish
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Manta Rays
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The Essence of Celery
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In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
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42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
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GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Detecting True Art
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Horseshoe Crabs
Moths
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Minks
Platypus
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Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
The Particle Zoo
IceCube Science
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Fast-flying fungal spores
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
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Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Unveiling Titan
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
Young Scientists Take Flight
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Robots on a Rocky Road
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Either Martians or Mars has gas
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Don't Eat That Sandwich!

Oops! In the rush to get to school, you drop a piece of toast on the floor. Do you throw it away or decide it's still OK to eat? If you're like most people, you eat it. Maybe you follow the "5-second rule," which claims foods are safe to eat if you pick them up within 5 seconds of dropping them. But you might want to think again. Scientists now say that 5 seconds are all it takes for foods to become contaminated with enough bacteria to make you sick. Bacteria are single-celled organisms that can cause many kinds of illnesses. Some kinds of bacteria can grow on food. If we eat foods on which these bacteria are growing, we can become sick. Common symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea. One of these food-borne bacteria is Salmonella. It makes 1.4 million people sick every year. Earlier this year, 370 people became sick after eating peanut butter that had been contaminated with Salmonella at the manufacturing plant. Salmonella are often found in raw eggs and chicken. Cooking kills these bacteria, which is why it is so important to cook eggs, chicken, and other foods thoroughly. Being a good housekeeper is a second tip for preventing infection. If household surfaces aren't washed thoroughly, they can support Salmonella for weeks. But how long does it take these bacteria to attach to food? To answer that question, a team of scientists at Clemson University in South Carolina decided to test the 5-second rule, using sandwich ingredients. First, they placed a known amount of Salmonella cells on three surfaces: wood, tile, and carpet. They placed a slice of bread and a slice of bologna on each surface for 5, 30, or 60 seconds. After just 5 seconds, both the bread and bologna picked up enough bacteria to make you sick. "Someone making a sandwich might follow someone who, a day before, used that surface to cut meat or another raw food. It might not look contaminated, but could have bacteria that would be harmful," said Paul Dawson, the food scientist who led the study. So, forget the 5-second rule. If your toast lands on the floor, toss it out. Stick a fresh slice of bread in the toaster. And this time, be careful not to drop it!—Jennifer Cutraro

Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Don't Eat That Sandwich!








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