Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Seeds of the Future
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Feeding School for Meerkats
Cacophony Acoustics
Behavior
Fear Matters
The (kids') eyes have it
Girls are cool for school
Birds
Finches
Flamingos
Chicken
Chemistry and Materials
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
A Light Delay
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Computers
Music of the Future
The science of disappearing
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Dino Babies
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Farms sprout in cities
Warmest Year on Record
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Environment
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Spotty Survival
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Fakes in the museum
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
Dogfish
Sturgeons
Eels
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
How Super Are Superfruits?
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Math of the World
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Teen Brains, Under Construction
A New Touch
Invertebrates
Giant Squid
Leeches
Mosquitos
Mammals
Bloodhounds
Siberian Husky
Bonobos
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Gaining a Swift Lift
Black Hole Journey
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Farms sprout in cities
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Caimans
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
An Earthlike Planet
Roving the Red Planet
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Arctic Melt
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Don't Eat That Sandwich!

Oops! In the rush to get to school, you drop a piece of toast on the floor. Do you throw it away or decide it's still OK to eat? If you're like most people, you eat it. Maybe you follow the "5-second rule," which claims foods are safe to eat if you pick them up within 5 seconds of dropping them. But you might want to think again. Scientists now say that 5 seconds are all it takes for foods to become contaminated with enough bacteria to make you sick. Bacteria are single-celled organisms that can cause many kinds of illnesses. Some kinds of bacteria can grow on food. If we eat foods on which these bacteria are growing, we can become sick. Common symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea. One of these food-borne bacteria is Salmonella. It makes 1.4 million people sick every year. Earlier this year, 370 people became sick after eating peanut butter that had been contaminated with Salmonella at the manufacturing plant. Salmonella are often found in raw eggs and chicken. Cooking kills these bacteria, which is why it is so important to cook eggs, chicken, and other foods thoroughly. Being a good housekeeper is a second tip for preventing infection. If household surfaces aren't washed thoroughly, they can support Salmonella for weeks. But how long does it take these bacteria to attach to food? To answer that question, a team of scientists at Clemson University in South Carolina decided to test the 5-second rule, using sandwich ingredients. First, they placed a known amount of Salmonella cells on three surfaces: wood, tile, and carpet. They placed a slice of bread and a slice of bologna on each surface for 5, 30, or 60 seconds. After just 5 seconds, both the bread and bologna picked up enough bacteria to make you sick. "Someone making a sandwich might follow someone who, a day before, used that surface to cut meat or another raw food. It might not look contaminated, but could have bacteria that would be harmful," said Paul Dawson, the food scientist who led the study. So, forget the 5-second rule. If your toast lands on the floor, toss it out. Stick a fresh slice of bread in the toaster. And this time, be careful not to drop it!—Jennifer Cutraro

Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Don't Eat That Sandwich!








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