Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
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Toads
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A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Not Slippery When Wet
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
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The Smell of Trust
Talking with Hands
Video Game Violence
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Dodos
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Fog Buster
When frog gender flips
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
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Look into My Eyes
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Lighting goes digital
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mini T. rex
The man who rocked biology to its core
Dino-bite!
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Wave of Destruction
A Volcano Wakes Up
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
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Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
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Spotty Survival
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Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Basking Sharks
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Symbols from the Stone Age
Yummy bugs
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GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Monkeys Count
Detecting True Art
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
Music in the Brain
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Crabs
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Lice
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Aquatic Animals
African Mammals
Capybaras
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Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Electric Backpack
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Project Music
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Making the most of a meal
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
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Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
A Family in Space
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Algae Motors
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Ready, unplug, drive
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Domestic Shorthairs

A Domestic shorthaired cat (DSH) is the proper name for a shorthaired cat that does not have a pedigree or belong to a recognized cat breed. All Shapes and Sizes: Domestic shorthaired cats are characterized by a wide range of coloring. They typically 'revert to type' after a few generations, which means they express their coats as a tabby. This can be any color or combination of colors. American Made: The American Shorthair, however, is a pedigreed cat that is the most popular and most prevalent breed of American cat. American Shorthairs are medium to large sized cats, with powerful legs and strong paws. Their muzzle is squarish. Their coat is short, with the fur being thick, dense, and stiff to protect them from cold, moisture, and superficial skin injuries. Their coat thickens up in the winter and sheds in the spring but still remains lighter and slimmer than its close cousin, the British Shorthair. Unpredictable Behavior: Domestic shorthaired cats exhibit a wide range of physical characteristics, and as a result, domestic shorthaired cats in different countries tend to look different in body shape and size, as they are drawing from differing gene pools. Still, they are all recognizable as cats, and any male (tom) cat could successfully breed with any other female (queen), meaning they are the same species. A Fine American: American Shorthairs, on the other hand, are very affectionate, long-living, and disinclined to behavioral problems; they get along well with other family members, including dogs. The American Shorthair is also an excellent hunter, but its sunny and gentle disposition make it ideal for families with small children. Shorthairs tend to get overweight very easily. Late Bloomers: An American Shorthair is not considered fully grown until 3-4 years old, when it attains the true strong athletic proportion of its breed. Males are usually larger than females and whole males have definite jowls. It is perfectly happy as an indoor or outdoor cat. Looks aren't everything: American Shorthairs come in over a 100 different varieties of colors (blacks, whites, silvers, creams, reds, browns, blues, bicolors, tabby or solid), but their eyes, pad color, and nose will always match their coloring. Their tail tapers to a blunt tip and has no kinks. Grooming for an American Shorthair is extremely easy, all they require is regular brushing and a wipe over with a damp chamois will make the coat shine. During shedding seasons using a good shedding comb weekly helps prevent hairballs.

Domestic Shorthairs
Domestic Shorthairs








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