Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Clone Wars
Red Apes in Danger
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Behavior
The case of the headless ant
Talking with Hands
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Birds
Kookaburras
Parrots
Backyard Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Pencil Thin
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Flytrap Machine
Computers
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
Dino-bite!
Mini T. rex
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
A Great Quake Coming?
Environment
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
The Wolf and the Cow
Snow Traps
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Sahara Cemetery
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Perches
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Dogfish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Sponges' secret weapon
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Losing with Heads or Tails
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Electricity's Spark of Life
Invertebrates
Tapeworms
Cockroaches
Black Widow spiders
Mammals
Ferrets
St. Bernards
African Mammals
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Electric Backpack
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Road Bumps
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Springing forward
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Anacondas
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Melting Snow on Mars
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Slip Sliming Away
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Arctic Melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
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Disease Detectives

Anytown, U.S.A., has a serious problem. One of its residents is very sick. Doctors suspect avian influenza. The disease, also called bird flu, can be devastating. "If we do nothing," says Taylor Jones, the freckle-faced mayor of Anytown, "most likely, 70 percent of people in this town will die." While Jones and an epidemiologist use computer models to assess the town's risk, a virologist scans mucus samples to prepare a diagnosis. The patient, a 33-year-old named Joe Plastic, lies in a hospital isolation unit. He's struggling to breathe. "He's starting to die," says Dr. Jayne Thompson. The virologist, Kushal Naik, has more bad news. "Joe is positive for avian flu, but that's not the worst part," Naik says. "We have nine specimens from other hospitals that are also positive. It's spreading." This crisis ends quickly, however, mainly because it's fictional. The team, ranging in age from 11 to 15, is tackling one of six 90-minute challenges at this year's Discovery Channel Young Scientist Challenge (DCYSC). Each fall, DCYSC brings 40 middle school science fair champs to Washington, D.C., to compete for more than $100,000 in scholarships, prizes, and the honor of being named "America's Top Young Scientist of the Year." Winners must combine problem solving with quick thinking, teamwork, and the ability to explain complicated ideas clearly. Gut navigation This year's team competition, which had a medical theme, took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md. Most challenges involved real-world medical problems. And cutting-edge NIH researchers were there to help. "We try to deal with issues in the news," says Steve "Jake" Jacobs, head DCYSC judge. "NIH provided us with an opportunity available nowhere else on the planet." NIH researcher Ronald Summers, for example, studies virtual colonoscopy, a new way to screen for cancer of the colon (or large intestine). The technique combines X-ray–like computerized tomography (CT) scans with computer software to create three-dimensional videos of the inside of the colon. Doctors can then check the images for polyps, mushroomlike growths that can become cancerous. The new diagnostic method is more comfortable for patients than the standard procedure. In that procedure, "you insert the scope into the patient's bottom and thread it through," Summers says. "A light and digital camera show you everything." To compare the standard and new methods, students tried out each one. To perform a mock CT exam, they navigated through virtual images of five colons to spot the polyps in each. For the standard method, students threaded a 63-inch-long scope through a plastic model of a human colon. A screen displayed what was inside. Steering the probe through the twists and folds of the colon was difficult. "I have no idea what I'm looking at," Otana Jakpor, 12, admitted at one point. Teammate Jack Grundy, 13, punctured the fake patient's intestinal wall by mistake. Before the challenge ended, the colon explorers regrouped with teammates who had been injecting glowing proteins into see-through fish embryos. Together, the team needed to make a 3-minute, kid-to-kid video about new ways to look inside organisms. Lunchtime Downstairs, a different group of finalists battled another public health crisis: obesity. First, the team had to assemble a 500-calorie lunch from a selection of foods whose nutritional labels were hidden. The team picked a chicken wrap, a banana, carrot sticks, Fig Newtons, and milk. The students were dismayed to learn that they'd overshot their mark: The lunch they'd assembled packed a walloping 885 calories. Next, they used a chart, a treadmill, and their mathematics skills to figure out how much exercise it would take for a 125-pound person to burn off such a lunch. After arguing about who would actually do so much exercise, they settled on four choices: an hour of basketball, an hour of tennis, 30 minutes of walking, and 30 minutes of lawn mowing. Finally, the team created a podcast about energy balance and weight control. "If people realized they had to do all that [exercise to burn off the calories in] a cookie, they might change their minds," Joseph Church, 14, said. Collin McAliley, 13, was unconvinced. "It's such a good cookie, though," he said. Grand prize DCYSC involved more than challenges, dinners, meeting people, and having fun. On the final morning, the finalists visited an elementary school in Washington, D.C. They fielded questions, demonstrated science experiments, and helped kids with their science projects. At the awards ceremony, the grand prize, a $20,000 scholarship, went to Nolan Kamitaki, 14, of Waiakea Intermediate School in Hilo, Hawaii. Jacob "Pi" Hurwitz, 14, of Robert Frost Middle School in Rockville, Md., received a $10,000 scholarship. His nickname reflects his ability to recite 320 decimal digits of the number pi. Amy David, 15, of Pinedale Middle School in Wyo., won third place and a $5,000 scholarship. "One reason we're happy to have such bright, energetic people getting into science is that you are the next generation of leaders," NIH's Anthony Fauci told the finalists. "You are choosing a life of discovery and a probing of the unknown. It's a most unusual and extraordinary life."

Disease Detectives
Disease Detectives








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