Agriculture
Watering the Air
Silk’s superpowers
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Salamanders
Toads
Newts
Animals
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Bee Disease
Not Slippery When Wet
Behavior
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Contemplating thought
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Birds
Birds We Eat
Hawks
Robins
Chemistry and Materials
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Atom Hauler
Computers
The Book of Life
Getting in Touch with Touch
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Hall of Dinos
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Greener Diet
Environment
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Shrimpy Invaders
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Oldest Writing in the New World
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Megamouth Sharks
Flashlight Fishes
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Play for Science
Human Body
Gut Microbes and Weight
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Dust Mites
Giant Clam
Mammals
Coyotes
Humans
Bats
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Speedy stars
IceCube Science
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Seeds of the Future
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Reptiles
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
Supersuits for Superheroes
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Middle school science adventures
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Dinosaur Eggs-citement

Dinosaurs may have become extinct, but they sure didn't disappear. Scientists recently announced finding dino bones with scraps of cells and blood vessels preserved inside them (see "Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone"). Now, a different group of paleontologists has found dinosaur eggs, with their shells on, inside a female dino fossil. It's the first discovery of its kind. Researchers from Canada and Taiwan found bones from the lower part—the pelvis—of a female dinosaur in southern China. Based on measurements of surrounding dirt, the dinosaur lived between 100 million and 65 million years ago. Two potato-shaped eggs filled the inside of the dinosaur's pelvis, which suggests that the Mama dino was just about ready to lay them when she died. Each egg was 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) long. Whatever was inside the eggs had long since disintegrated. There weren't enough remains to identify the species of dinosaur, but the researchers can tell that it belonged to a group called oviraptorosaurs. Because the dino's eggs filled its pelvic cavity, the scientists conclude that this type of dinosaur could carry only two eggs at a time. And because the eggs were of similar size, the dinosaur probably produced them at the same time. These traits make the dinosaur similar to both modern reptiles and modern birds. The new find adds to previous evidence about the egg-laying habits of oviraptorosaurs. Scientists have found oviraptorosaur nests in Asia that held rings of eggs grouped into pairs. Fossil evidence suggests that oviraptorosaurs spent lots of time during the nesting season laying their eggs, two at a time, while crouching in the center of their nests. With each new fossil discovery, it's becoming easier to picture what the world was really like when dinosaurs lived.—E. Sohn

Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Dinosaur Eggs-citement








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™