Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Polar Bears in Trouble
Thieves of a Feather
From Chimps to People
Behavior
Taking a Spill for Science
Island of Hope
Pipefish power from mom
Birds
Falcons
Ospreys
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
The newest superheavy in town
The memory of a material
Computers
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
Dino-bite!
Downsized Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Weird, new ant
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Unnatural Disasters
Environment
A Change in Climate
Shrimpy Invaders
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
A Long Trek to Asia
Oldest Writing in the New World
Fish
Tilapia
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Manta Rays
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Packing Fat
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Foul Play?
Taste Messenger
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Spiders
Oysters
Scallops
Mammals
Prairie Dogs
Domestic Shorthairs
Chihuahuas
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
One ring around them all
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Turtles
Crocodiles
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Baby Star
Dark Galaxy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Weaving with Light
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Watering the Air
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

Dinosaur Eggs-citement

Dinosaurs may have become extinct, but they sure didn't disappear. Scientists recently announced finding dino bones with scraps of cells and blood vessels preserved inside them (see "Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone"). Now, a different group of paleontologists has found dinosaur eggs, with their shells on, inside a female dino fossil. It's the first discovery of its kind. Researchers from Canada and Taiwan found bones from the lower part—the pelvis—of a female dinosaur in southern China. Based on measurements of surrounding dirt, the dinosaur lived between 100 million and 65 million years ago. Two potato-shaped eggs filled the inside of the dinosaur's pelvis, which suggests that the Mama dino was just about ready to lay them when she died. Each egg was 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) long. Whatever was inside the eggs had long since disintegrated. There weren't enough remains to identify the species of dinosaur, but the researchers can tell that it belonged to a group called oviraptorosaurs. Because the dino's eggs filled its pelvic cavity, the scientists conclude that this type of dinosaur could carry only two eggs at a time. And because the eggs were of similar size, the dinosaur probably produced them at the same time. These traits make the dinosaur similar to both modern reptiles and modern birds. The new find adds to previous evidence about the egg-laying habits of oviraptorosaurs. Scientists have found oviraptorosaur nests in Asia that held rings of eggs grouped into pairs. Fossil evidence suggests that oviraptorosaurs spent lots of time during the nesting season laying their eggs, two at a time, while crouching in the center of their nests. With each new fossil discovery, it's becoming easier to picture what the world was really like when dinosaurs lived.—E. Sohn

Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Dinosaur Eggs-citement








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™