Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Watching out for vultures
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Who's Knocking?
Elephant Mimics
Behavior
Making Sense of Scents
Swine flu goes global
Fish needs see-through head
Birds
Turkeys
Pigeons
Pheasants
Chemistry and Materials
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
A Framework for Growing Bone
Heaviest named element is official
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
Lighting goes digital
Hubble trouble doubled
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Earth Rocks On
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Flounder
Swordfish
Megamouth Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
Chew for Health
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Heart Revival
Invertebrates
Giant Squid
Giant Clam
Sea Urchin
Mammals
Raccoons
Rodents
Numbats
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
No Fat Stars
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Flying the Hyper Skies
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Science loses out when ice caps melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone

The last dinosaurs on Earth died some 65 million years ago, but they left bits of themselves behind everywhere they lived. Around the world, dug-up bones have given scientists lots of clues about what the mega-reptiles were like. Now, paleontologists have found an even juicier type of dino fossil—a Tyrannosaurus rex's upper leg bone with cells and blood vessels still intact. This dinosaur lived 68 million years ago. Researchers from North Carolina State University in Raleigh discovered the remains in what is now Montana. The bone they dug up had been hardened by minerals, so the scientists started by soaking the bone in a solution to dissolve the minerals. A week later, the leftover material was soft and stretchy, which surprised the researchers. Parts of the remains looked clear and stringy. They stayed that way even after being dried out and revived with water over and over again. Some of the samples appeared to be a network of blood vessels. Out of these supposed blood vessels, the researchers were able to squeeze tiny, round, dark-red and deep-brown structures that seemed to be ancient blood cells. There was also evidence of specialized bone cells. To test their conclusion, the researchers performed similar experiments on modern ostrich bones. They ended up with the same sorts of structures. Scientists consider this discovery amazing because most fossils come from hard body parts, like bones and shells, which are sturdy and last a long time. Soft tissues, like skin, muscle, and organs, on the other hand, are much harder to come by because they tend to disintegrate quickly. There may be many more dino cells out there. After the researchers finished inspecting the first T. rex sample, they then used the technique to uncover these same types of cells in samples from several other dinosaur fossils. Paleontologists think that the new discoveries will help them better understand how fossils form. Future finds should also help flesh out how the dinosaurs lived.—E. Sohn

Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™