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Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
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Vent Worms Like It Hot
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Small but WISE
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Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Deep History
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Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Untangling Human Origins
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
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Sponges' secret weapon
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
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GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
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Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
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GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
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Losing with Heads or Tails
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Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Hear, Hear
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Electricity's Spark of Life
Invertebrates
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Giant Squid
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Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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How children learn
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Invisibility Ring
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Surprise Visitor
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Chaos Among the Planets
Pluto's New Moons
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
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Toy Challenge
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
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Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
How to Fly Like a Bat
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Watering the Air
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Warmest Year on Record
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Digging Up Stone Age Art

Art is everywhere, from paintings in the doctor's office to sculptures in the park. You've probably molded shapes out of clay or drawn pictures of your own pets at one time or another. Art is such a big part of our lives, in fact, that scientists want to know when people started making it and why. Now, researchers in Germany have found some clues in three of the oldest little sculptures yet uncovered. Dating back to between 35,000 and 30,000 years ago, the figurines resemble a horse's head, a duck-like water bird, and a creature that is half-lion, half-human. Each is about as long as an adult's thumb, and all three are made out of mammoth ivory. Nicholas J. Conrad of the University of Tübingen in Germany and his colleagues found the pieces in a cave in southwestern Germany called Hohle Fels. No human fossils have been found near the artwork. However, Conrad thinks that people moved into the area around 40,000 years ago and used the caves there during the winter and spring. The new German finds come from a time when artwork began to flourish in Europe. Conrad suspects that the figurines were made for use in supernatural rituals. For now, there's no way to know for sure. Just think, though. Every time you doodle, color, or sculpt, you're joining a long line of artists, dating back thousands and thousands of years.—E. Sohn

Digging Up Stone Age Art
Digging Up Stone Age Art








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