Agriculture
Watering the Air
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Toads
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Cool Penguins
Behavior
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Island of Hope
Eating Troubles
Birds
Cranes
Emus
Kiwis
Chemistry and Materials
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
The newest superheavy in town
The Buzz about Caffeine
Computers
Computers with Attitude
A Classroom of the Mind
Middle school science adventures
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Battling Mastodons
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Plastic-munching microbes
A Volcano Wakes Up
Environment
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Flu river
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Decoding a Beverage Jar
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
Goldfish
Basking Sharks
Puffer Fish
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Chew for Health
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Sun Screen
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Bedbugs
Grasshoppers
Flatworms
Mammals
Quokkas
Grizzly Bear
Rats
Parents
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Invisibility Ring
Project Music
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Anacondas
Pythons
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Revving Up Green Machines
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Digging into a Tsunami Disaster

The date Dec. 26, 2004, will be long remembered by many people. First, there was a powerful earthquake at the bottom of the Indian Ocean. Then, a massive wave called a tsunami spread out in all directions. When the wave hit the shores of nations surrounding the ocean, more than 145,000 people died. Now, scientists are using computers and other tools to study how this catastrophic event changed Earth. The Indian Ocean earthquake was the largest one in 40 years. On the Richter scale, which rates the strength of earthquakes, the event scored 9.0. That's about as strong as earthquakes get. The quake occurred just north of an island in Indonesia called Simeulue. This spot is located in a zone where two immense sections of Earth's surface—called plates—meet. One section, called the India plate, is slowly sliding under the other section, called the Burma plate, at a rate of about 6 centimeters per year. In the recent quake, the sudden slippage was much larger. In some places, the plates may have been shoved as much as 20 meters (66 feet) past each other. And some slippage occurred all along 1,200 kilometers of the boundary between the plates. That's longer than the state of California! Where the shifting was most extreme, parts of the seafloor suddenly jerked up as much as 5 meters (16 feet). All of the water above the uplifted ground had to move as a result. That's what caused the tsunami. Computer studies by Chen Ji, a seismologist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, show that waves raced away from the quake site as fast as a jetliner. The first crash of water hit Sumatra 15 minutes after the quake, with waves as high as 15 meters (49 feet). Tsunamis hit Thailand 75 minutes after the earthquake. They hit Sri Lanka and India 4 hours after it happened. Disaster even reached as far as Africa. People died in Somalia and Kenya, some 5,000 kilometers (3,100 miles) away from the quake's center. Earth is different now. Besides all the wreckage that needs to be cleaned up and the sadness that must be dealt with, some parts of the ocean floor are higher than they were. Some areas are lower. There have also been changes in Earth's spin. When the India plate moved closer toward Earth's center, the planet became like a spinning figure skater who pulls her arms closer to her body. Earth started spinning more quickly. Its daily rotation is now about 2.67 milliseconds faster than it was before. Earth can feel so solid when you're standing on it. It's amazing how quickly everything can get shaken up.—E. Sohn

Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™