Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Newts
Animals
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Color-Changing Bugs
Feeding School for Meerkats
Behavior
Longer lives for wild elephants
The Smell of Trust
The case of the headless ant
Birds
Tropical Birds
Swans
Pelicans
Chemistry and Materials
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Graphene's superstrength
Computers
The Book of Life
Hubble trouble doubled
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Environment
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
The Oily Gulf
Snow Traps
Finding the Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Salt and Early Civilization
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Mako Sharks
Electric Ray
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
Recipe for Health
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
A New Touch
Music in the Brain
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Shrimps
Squid
Giant Squid
Mammals
Badgers
Narwhals
Little Brown Bats
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Speedy stars
Powering Ball Lightning
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
A Giant Flower's New Family
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Geckos
Sea Turtles
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
The two faces of Mars
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Machine Copy
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?

Imagine a dog standing only on its front feet, with its back legs up in the air. Now picture a cow in this pose. Or an elephant. You don't see such animal acrobatics very often. But scientists know that giant dinosaurs, called sauropods, sometimes did this very stunt. They balanced on their front feet while keeping their hind legs off the ground. The proof is in the footprints the dinosaurs left behind. Some sets of sauropod footprints include only the front feet. These prints have been a real puzzle for scientists, partly because sauropods were so massive. A typical adult sauropod might have weighed 100 metric tons, which is equivalent to the weight of about 70 cars. Part of this weight was due to the animals' enormous tails. So it's not too difficult to imagine these dinosaurs standing on just their hind legs. They might have reared up, like a horse, to defend themselves. Or they might have stood on their back legs to reach leaves in the treetops. But how did these hefty animals manage to walk on their front legs, keeping their tails off the ground? And why did they do it? Donald Henderson, a scientist at the University of Calgary, used computer simulations and Jeffrey Wilson and Daniel Fisher of the University of Michigan used plastic models of sauropods to find the answers. They concluded that the dinosaurs could balance on their front legs only if they were wading in shallow water. In some sauropod species, the rear of their bodies—along with their tails and hind legs—would float, while their front feet would dig into the underwater mud. In other sauropod species, the hind legs might also dig into the mud—but much less than the front feet. Over time, the shallower, rear footprints would tend to disappear, while the deeper, front footprints would remain visible. All that would be left are hints of an amazing dinosaur feat and a tantalizing puzzle for researchers to solve.—S. McDonagh

Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™