Agriculture
Springing forward
Getting the dirt on carbon
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
From Chimps to People
The History of Meow
G-Tunes with a Message
Behavior
Sugar-pill medicine
Monkeys in the Mirror
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Birds
Ducks
Macaws
Vultures
Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
Batteries built by Viruses
Boosting Fuel Cells
Computers
The Shape of the Internet
Getting in Touch with Touch
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Big, Weird Dino
Battling Mastodons
Downsized Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Earth's Poles in Peril
Deep History
Environment
Pollution Detective
Inspired by Nature
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
A Long Haul
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Hammerhead Sharks
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Disease Detectives
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Hey batter, wake up!
Invertebrates
Jellyfish
Octopuses
Dragonflies
Mammals
Cheetah
Rats
Dogs
Parents
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Tortoises
Turtles
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Pluto's New Moons
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Machine Copy
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Ready, unplug, drive
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Watering the Air
Catching Some Rays
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?

Imagine a dog standing only on its front feet, with its back legs up in the air. Now picture a cow in this pose. Or an elephant. You don't see such animal acrobatics very often. But scientists know that giant dinosaurs, called sauropods, sometimes did this very stunt. They balanced on their front feet while keeping their hind legs off the ground. The proof is in the footprints the dinosaurs left behind. Some sets of sauropod footprints include only the front feet. These prints have been a real puzzle for scientists, partly because sauropods were so massive. A typical adult sauropod might have weighed 100 metric tons, which is equivalent to the weight of about 70 cars. Part of this weight was due to the animals' enormous tails. So it's not too difficult to imagine these dinosaurs standing on just their hind legs. They might have reared up, like a horse, to defend themselves. Or they might have stood on their back legs to reach leaves in the treetops. But how did these hefty animals manage to walk on their front legs, keeping their tails off the ground? And why did they do it? Donald Henderson, a scientist at the University of Calgary, used computer simulations and Jeffrey Wilson and Daniel Fisher of the University of Michigan used plastic models of sauropods to find the answers. They concluded that the dinosaurs could balance on their front legs only if they were wading in shallow water. In some sauropod species, the rear of their bodies—along with their tails and hind legs—would float, while their front feet would dig into the underwater mud. In other sauropod species, the hind legs might also dig into the mud—but much less than the front feet. Over time, the shallower, rear footprints would tend to disappear, while the deeper, front footprints would remain visible. All that would be left are hints of an amazing dinosaur feat and a tantalizing puzzle for researchers to solve.—S. McDonagh

Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™