Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Fast-flying fungal spores
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Animals
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Blotchy Face, Big-Time Wasp
Roach Love Songs
Behavior
Dino-bite!
Making light of sleep
Lightening Your Mood
Birds
Birds We Eat
Kiwis
Swifts
Chemistry and Materials
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Sugary Survival Skill
Revving Up Green Machines
Computers
Music of the Future
Hitting the redo button on evolution
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Battling Mastodons
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Recipe for a Hurricane
Environment
Power of the Wind
Pollution Detective
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Writing on eggshells
Oldest Writing in the New World
Fish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Sting Ray
Marlin
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Walking to Exercise the Brain
A New Touch
Foul Play?
Invertebrates
Ticks
Flatworms
Butterflies
Mammals
African Wildedbeest
Great Danes
Pekingese
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Pythons
Snapping Turtles
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Middle school science adventures
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Arctic Melt
Catching Some Rays
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?

Imagine a dog standing only on its front feet, with its back legs up in the air. Now picture a cow in this pose. Or an elephant. You don't see such animal acrobatics very often. But scientists know that giant dinosaurs, called sauropods, sometimes did this very stunt. They balanced on their front feet while keeping their hind legs off the ground. The proof is in the footprints the dinosaurs left behind. Some sets of sauropod footprints include only the front feet. These prints have been a real puzzle for scientists, partly because sauropods were so massive. A typical adult sauropod might have weighed 100 metric tons, which is equivalent to the weight of about 70 cars. Part of this weight was due to the animals' enormous tails. So it's not too difficult to imagine these dinosaurs standing on just their hind legs. They might have reared up, like a horse, to defend themselves. Or they might have stood on their back legs to reach leaves in the treetops. But how did these hefty animals manage to walk on their front legs, keeping their tails off the ground? And why did they do it? Donald Henderson, a scientist at the University of Calgary, used computer simulations and Jeffrey Wilson and Daniel Fisher of the University of Michigan used plastic models of sauropods to find the answers. They concluded that the dinosaurs could balance on their front legs only if they were wading in shallow water. In some sauropod species, the rear of their bodies—along with their tails and hind legs—would float, while their front feet would dig into the underwater mud. In other sauropod species, the hind legs might also dig into the mud—but much less than the front feet. Over time, the shallower, rear footprints would tend to disappear, while the deeper, front footprints would remain visible. All that would be left are hints of an amazing dinosaur feat and a tantalizing puzzle for researchers to solve.—S. McDonagh

Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™