Agriculture
Springing forward
Got Milk? How?
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Newts
Animals
Roboroach and Company
Deep Krill
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Copycat Monkeys
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Birds
Hawks
Nightingales
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
Pencil Thin
Flytrap Machine
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
Troubles with Hubble
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Fossil Forests
South America's sticky tar pits
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Petrified Lightning
Environment
The Wolf and the Cow
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Island Extinctions
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
A Long Haul
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Fish
Puffer Fish
Electric Ray
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Strong Bones for Life
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
Flu Patrol
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Crabs
Crustaceans
Millipedes
Mammals
Black Bear
Numbats
Bumblebee Bats
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Electric Backpack
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Making the most of a meal
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Box Turtles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Dark Galaxy
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Shape Shifting
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Middle school science adventures
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

Diamond Glow

Diamonds are expensive because they're beautiful and rare. But fake diamonds often sell for a lot of money, too, because they can look very real. Now, scientists have discovered a way to distinguish certain genuine diamonds from imitations. The simple new technique works with a rare form of blue diamond that glows in the dark. Diamonds that belong to a group called type IIb usually look blue. After they absorb high-energy light, though, type IIb diamonds phosphoresce, or glow in the dark, for a little while. This phosphorescence ranges in color from blue to pink to fiery red, depending on the diamond. Type IIb diamonds can be stunning, and some of them are quite famous. The large Hope Diamond, for one, glows orange-red for up to a minute after the lights go out. (The Hope Diamond is on display at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.) Despite these diamonds' rarity and fame, however, scientists hadn't paid much attention to them till recently. To learn more about the stones, chemical engineer Sally Eaton-Magaña of the Gemological Institute of America in Carlsbad, Calif., and her colleagues studied a set of diamonds called the Aurora Heart Collection. The set contains 239 colored diamonds, including many blue, type IIb gems. They also studied the Smithsonian's Hope Diamond and its Blue Heart Diamond. In all, the researchers did experiments with 67 natural blue diamonds, three manmade gems, and a gray diamond that scientists had turned blue with a combination of temperature and pressure treatments. In one test, the scientists shone ultraviolet light—a type of high-energy light—on each gemstone for 20 seconds. Afterward, all the natural type IIb diamonds glowed for several seconds. Measurements revealed that this glow contained two wavelengths of visible light: greenish-blue and reddish. The relative strength of each wavelength determined the color of the final glow. And because each diamond is different, the scientists could use the color of the glow and how quickly the glow fades as a sort of fingerprint to identify individual gems. The technique also proved to be a good way to separate the real gems from the fakes. Neither the manmade diamonds nor the falsely colored gray diamond glowed in the reddish wavelength. The new strategy might help solve one of the diamond market's biggest problems: hard-to-spot fakes.—Emily Sohn

Diamond Glow
Diamond Glow








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™