Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Animals
Vampire Bats on the Run
A Wild Ferret Rise
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
Behavior
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
A Light Delay
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Birds
Quails
Ducks
Ospreys
Chemistry and Materials
Picture the Smell
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Makeup Science
Computers
New eyes to scan the skies
Nonstop Robot
Hubble trouble doubled
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
Digging for Ancient DNA
Dino Babies
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Bugs with Gas
Environment
Indoor ozone stopper
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
A Big Discovery about Little People
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Lungfish
Marlin
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Food for Life
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Surviving Olympic Heat
A Long Trek to Asia
Invertebrates
Praying Mantis
Walking Sticks
Caterpillars
Mammals
Cocker Spaniels
Chinchillas
Giraffes
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Project Music
Invisibility Ring
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Geckos
Gila Monsters
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Ringing Saturn
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Cool as a Jupiter
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Flying the Hyper Skies
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Detecting True Art

Real or fake? In the world of art, that can be an expensive question. Famous paintings by classic artists can sell for millions of dollars. To make a quick buck, people sometimes try to sell paintings that are imitations of the real thing. When the forgeries are done well, spotting them can be a major challenge, even for experts. Now, researchers say they have found a new way to tell the real from the fake—using mathematics. The researchers start with a digital image. They use a mathematical technique, known as wavelet decomposition, that breaks this image down into a collection of smaller, more-basic images. This method is especially useful for analyzing textures. In a photograph, it can readily detect the difference between the smooth appearance of a blue sky and the ruffled surface of a grassy field, for example. In a painting, it can capture the texture of an artist's brush strokes. When an imitator tries to copy a master artist, his or her brush strokes would probably be different. "A master might have smooth, consistent strokes, say, while an imitator is jerky," says Hany Farid, one of the researchers. Farid is a computer scientist at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. The researchers used wavelet decomposition and other statistical measures to analyze eight drawings by a 16th-century artist named Pieter Brueghel the Elder. They then compared the data obtained from these drawings with measurements of five imitations revealed to be false just 10 years ago. The team found that the genuine Brueghel drawings all had similar patterns. By the same measure, the fakes were different from each other and from the true drawings. The researchers also studied a painting called "Virgin and Child with Saints." It was created near the beginning of the 16th century in the studio of the Italian artist Pietro Perugino. Their method suggested that at least four artists actually produced the painting. Showing that the method works for two artists is not enough to conclude that it will work across the board. Still, art historians are optimistic. Mathematics may yet earn a place in an expert's toolkit for detecting forgeries.—E. Sohn

Detecting True Art
Detecting True Art








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™