Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders and Newts
Salamanders
Animals
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Walks on the Wild Side
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Behavior
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Sugar-pill medicine
Listening to Birdsong
Birds
Mockingbirds
Flamingos
Ospreys
Chemistry and Materials
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Sticky Silky Feet
Music of the Future
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
Middle school science adventures
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
A Dire Shortage of Water
The Rise of Yellowstone
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Flu river
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Great White Shark
Whale Sharks
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Food for Life
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Math of the World
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Attacking Asthma
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Bees
Scorpions
Mussels
Mammals
Rabbits
Elephants
Giant Panda
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
IceCube Science
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
A Giant Flower's New Family
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Lizards
Iguanas
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Deep Krill

A little over a year ago, scientists lowered a camera to the bottom of the Southern Ocean off the coast of Antarctica. The video images from that camera surprised them. Three thousand meters (9,800 feet) below the surface of the sea, the researchers observed what looked like an animal called Antarctic krill. Scientists had thought these shrimplike creatures lived only in the upper ocean, says Andrew Clarke of the British Antarctic Survey based in Cambridge, England.Clarke made the discovery on a science cruise during the South Pole summer of 2006–2007 (a period which corresponds to the Northern Hemisphere's winter). By that time of year, tiny floating organisms called plankton (a favorite food of krill) have multiplied in a big burst at the water's surface. From there, they slowly drift downward. Using a remotely operated vehicle that carried a video camera, Clarke and colleagues saw krill feeding on falling plankton. By studying the video footage, they identified the krill as the classic Antarctic species, Euphausia superba. The species was fairly easy to identify. It is relatively large, for one thing, growing up to 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) long. It has distinctive red markings. And it feeds in an unusual way when it's near the bottom. A krill nosedives into the sediment at the bottom, then scoops debris out of the water with spiny structures on its legs. Based on the video evidence, "there isn't really much else it could be" other than the Antarctic krill, says Stephen Nicol of the Australian Antarctica Division in Kingston, Tasmania. Scientists have occasionally spotted this species of krill several hundred meters deep, but never in water as deep as this. So, the scientists are not exactly sure what's going on. One possibility is that the krill simply stuck with their food as it sank ever deeper. If big groups of krill do this often, scientists might have to revise their ideas about how many krill there are and how nutrients move through oceans. "If the observation proves true about the krill at 3000 m," writes Peter Wiebe of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts (who's currently on a different research expedition), "then it shows how little we really understand about how the ocean ecosystem is structured and functions."—Emily Sohn

Deep Krill
Deep Krill








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™