Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Animals
Lives of a Mole Rat
Red Apes in Danger
Living in the Desert
Behavior
Copycat Monkeys
Brainy bees know two from three
Girls are cool for school
Birds
Cranes
Quails
A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
The science of disappearing
Lighting goes digital
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Computers
Getting in Touch with Touch
Nonstop Robot
A Light Delay
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
A Dino King's Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Plastic-munching microbes
Deep History
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Environment
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Little Bits of Trouble
Pollution Detective
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Skates
Codfish
Hagfish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Spit Power
Attacking Asthma
A Long Trek to Asia
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Crabs
Insects
Mammals
Bulldogs
Rottweilers
Miscellaneous Mammals
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Invisibility Ring
IceCube Science
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Flower family knows its roots
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Boa Constrictors
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Holes in Martian moon mystery
A Planet from the Early Universe
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Algae Motors
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Troubles with Hubble
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Earth's Poles in Peril
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

Deep Krill

A little over a year ago, scientists lowered a camera to the bottom of the Southern Ocean off the coast of Antarctica. The video images from that camera surprised them. Three thousand meters (9,800 feet) below the surface of the sea, the researchers observed what looked like an animal called Antarctic krill. Scientists had thought these shrimplike creatures lived only in the upper ocean, says Andrew Clarke of the British Antarctic Survey based in Cambridge, England.Clarke made the discovery on a science cruise during the South Pole summer of 2006–2007 (a period which corresponds to the Northern Hemisphere's winter). By that time of year, tiny floating organisms called plankton (a favorite food of krill) have multiplied in a big burst at the water's surface. From there, they slowly drift downward. Using a remotely operated vehicle that carried a video camera, Clarke and colleagues saw krill feeding on falling plankton. By studying the video footage, they identified the krill as the classic Antarctic species, Euphausia superba. The species was fairly easy to identify. It is relatively large, for one thing, growing up to 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) long. It has distinctive red markings. And it feeds in an unusual way when it's near the bottom. A krill nosedives into the sediment at the bottom, then scoops debris out of the water with spiny structures on its legs. Based on the video evidence, "there isn't really much else it could be" other than the Antarctic krill, says Stephen Nicol of the Australian Antarctica Division in Kingston, Tasmania. Scientists have occasionally spotted this species of krill several hundred meters deep, but never in water as deep as this. So, the scientists are not exactly sure what's going on. One possibility is that the krill simply stuck with their food as it sank ever deeper. If big groups of krill do this often, scientists might have to revise their ideas about how many krill there are and how nutrients move through oceans. "If the observation proves true about the krill at 3000 m," writes Peter Wiebe of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts (who's currently on a different research expedition), "then it shows how little we really understand about how the ocean ecosystem is structured and functions."—Emily Sohn

Deep Krill
Deep Krill








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™