Agriculture
Watching out for vultures
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
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Putting a Mouse on Pause
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Mouse Songs
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Honeybees do the wave
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Mind-reading Machine
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Screaming for Ice Cream
Silk’s superpowers
Undercover Detectives
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Small but WISE
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Supersight for a Dino King
The man who rocked biology to its core
Ferocious Growth Spurts
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Environment
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
A Plankhouse Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Fish
Parrotfish
Bull Sharks
Seahorses
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
The Color of Health
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Math is a real brain bender
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Surviving Olympic Heat
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Giant Squid
Sea Urchin
Jellyfish
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Moles
Weasels and Kin
Deers
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
One ring around them all
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Bright Blooms That Glow
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Copperhead Snakes
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Unveiling Titan
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Bionic Bacteria
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Robots on the Road, Again
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Watering the Air
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Dark Galaxy

The Milky Way is packed with stars, comets, asteroids, moons, and planets, including our own. Other galaxies in the universe are similarly crammed full of stars and various objects. Astronomers have now spied something very unusual. They've found a patch of space that looks empty but actually appears to be a galaxy that contains no stars. Theorists had proposed that such "dark" galaxies could exist, but no one had ever seen one before. The mysterious object is in an area of space known as the Virgo cluster of galaxies. This cluster is the closet one to the Milky Way and contains more than 100 galaxies of various types, including spiral and elliptical galaxies. Five years ago, astronomers at Cardiff University in Wales noticed that this vast region has a pair of isolated clouds made up of hydrogen gas. Further observations revealed that one of the clouds is associated with a faintly glowing galaxy. This makes sense because balls of hydrogen gas usually indicate an area where stars are forming. The other hydrogen ball, however, appears to have no glowing galaxy as a partner. Yet, other observations suggest that it's part of a massive object weighing as much as a galaxy of 100 billion suns. The astronomers propose that the object, named VIRGOHI21, is full of a mysterious substance called dark matter. And they say there might be many more galaxies just like it. Astronomers just haven't spotted them yet. For now, there's a lot of explaining to do. "Seeing a dark galaxy—a galaxy without any stars—is like seeing a city without any people," says astronomer Robert Minchin of Cardiff University. "We want to know why nobody lives there."—E. Sohn

Dark Galaxy
Dark Galaxy








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