Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Elephant Mimics
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Behavior
The Science Fair Circuit
Mice sense each other's fear
Night of the living ants
Birds
Pelicans
Cardinals
Condors
Chemistry and Materials
Sticky Silky Feet
Screaming for Ice Cream
Silk’s superpowers
Computers
The science of disappearing
Nonstop Robot
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
A Big, Weird Dino
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Springing forward
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Inspired by Nature
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Childhood's Long History
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Sharks
Megamouth Sharks
Trout
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
Chocolate Rules
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Math is a real brain bender
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Foul Play?
A Better Flu Shot
Invertebrates
Moths
Krill
Walking Sticks
Mammals
Tasmanian Devil
Sheep
Gazelle
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
IceCube Science
Powering Ball Lightning
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Surprise Visitor
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Geckos
Chameleons
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Planets on the Edge
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Searching for Alien Life
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Charged cars that would charge
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Where rivers run uphill
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Add your Article

Dark Galaxy

The Milky Way is packed with stars, comets, asteroids, moons, and planets, including our own. Other galaxies in the universe are similarly crammed full of stars and various objects. Astronomers have now spied something very unusual. They've found a patch of space that looks empty but actually appears to be a galaxy that contains no stars. Theorists had proposed that such "dark" galaxies could exist, but no one had ever seen one before. The mysterious object is in an area of space known as the Virgo cluster of galaxies. This cluster is the closet one to the Milky Way and contains more than 100 galaxies of various types, including spiral and elliptical galaxies. Five years ago, astronomers at Cardiff University in Wales noticed that this vast region has a pair of isolated clouds made up of hydrogen gas. Further observations revealed that one of the clouds is associated with a faintly glowing galaxy. This makes sense because balls of hydrogen gas usually indicate an area where stars are forming. The other hydrogen ball, however, appears to have no glowing galaxy as a partner. Yet, other observations suggest that it's part of a massive object weighing as much as a galaxy of 100 billion suns. The astronomers propose that the object, named VIRGOHI21, is full of a mysterious substance called dark matter. And they say there might be many more galaxies just like it. Astronomers just haven't spotted them yet. For now, there's a lot of explaining to do. "Seeing a dark galaxy—a galaxy without any stars—is like seeing a city without any people," says astronomer Robert Minchin of Cardiff University. "We want to know why nobody lives there."—E. Sohn

Dark Galaxy
Dark Galaxy








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™