Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Animals
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
Behavior
Girls are cool for school
Contemplating thought
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Birds
Penguins
Eagles
Songbirds
Chemistry and Materials
These gems make their own way
Diamond Glow
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Troubles with Hubble
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Dinosaur Dig
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Riding to Earth's Core
Deep Drilling at Sea
Environment
Improving the Camel
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Finding the Past
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
A Big Discovery about Little People
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Bass
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Eels
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
Chocolate Rules
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Earthworms
Crawfish
Butterflies
Mammals
St. Bernards
Baboons
Rodents
Parents
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Making the most of a meal
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Snakes
Copperhead Snakes
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
Ready, Set, Supernova
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Weaving with Light
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Crocodile Hearts

Like mammal and bird hearts, a crocodile's heart is a muscle that pumps blood. One side of the heart sends blood that is full of oxygen out to most of the body. The other side pulls blood back toward the lungs to give it an oxygen refill. But crocodile (and alligator) hearts have an extra valve that mammal and bird hearts don't have. The extra valve is a flap that the animal can close in order to keep blood from flowing toward the lungs. This means that the blood goes right back into the body instead. Although scientists have known about the crocodile heart's extra valve for many years, they haven't known what it was for. Some scientists thought that it might help crocodiles and alligators stay underwater longer, making them better, more deadly hunters. Now, scientists have a new idea about what a crocodile's heart can do. By studying captive alligators, scientists discovered that the extra valve can reroute some of the blood normally pumped to its lungs to its stomach instead. This diversion lasts about the same amount of time that it takes an alligator to digest a big meal. To see if the valve is really connected to digestion, the scientists used surgery to close the valve in some captive alligators but left it working in others. They then fed each alligator a meal of hamburger meat and an oxtail bone. Alligators with a working valve digested the tough meal quicker. Blood returning from the body to the heart has extra carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is also a building block of stomach acid, which helps digest food. So, when blood rich with carbon dioxide goes to the stomach instead of the lungs, it can aid digestion. Whether it helps alligators and crocodiles pursue their underwater prey or helps them digest it, the heart's special valve does seem to give these hunters a leg up on the competition.óC. Gramling

Crocodile Hearts
Crocodile Hearts








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™